Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 159

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 159

 …Americans love the movies. Cold War Americans are fearful of communists. Movie Stars associate with communists. Connect the dots

Feeling frustration and fresh off another in a string of failed mischievous deeds, Pentateuch is pushing L. Dick Cannon into going public with his new Hollywood recruit, John Garfield. If Cannon get Garfield to join him on a publicity tour, Pentateuch is convinced they can offset anything that that damned Graham can put together.

Garfield has been blacklisted by the motion picture industry because of his alleged communist ties. His wife was a member of the Communist Party in the near past, but there is no real evidence that John himself had pledged allegiance to the group. But that does not matter to men like Wisconsin’s Joseph McCarthy, who choose to accuse huge numbers of American citizens with communist sympathy.

In the previous year the newsletter COUNTERATTACK published a report on the communist influence in radio and television. In the pamphlet Red Channels, the groundwork is laid for the blacklist, a toxic list of some 200 actors, writers and directors, following the original outing of the notorious Hollywood Ten of 1947.

This is an overt fearmongering campaign by anti-communist China and textile importer, Alfred Kohlberg. He has made it a simple equation: Americans love the movies. Cold War Americans are fearful of communists. Movie Stars associate with communists. Connect the dots

As a result of this ostracism, Garfield is ripe for the picking, with Spiritual Engineering giving him a liberal platform from which to operate. Never mind that he doesn’t really buy into as a religion. He can use it, just like it intends to use him.

But this blacklisting is a California thing and the only work he can get now is in New York on the stages of Broadway.

“I think I can get some of the other blacklisted people to join us. Most of them, probably like me, don’t have a clue about what diabetics is!”

“It is called Dianetics and its foundational principle is that all living creatures are trying to survive. Using the methods of Dianetics, I can get the human brain to cast off the negative thoughts that hold them back.”

“Well irregardless, we only want to tell our side of the story.”

“That would be ‘regardless’ and all we want to do is have you show us your public support.”

“Whatever… what’s with this we stuff, who is we?” Garfield is from Manhattan’s rough & tumble Lower East Side.

“Mr. Winters and I,” the mysterious Winters appearing out of nowhere to Cannon’s surprise. He has been writing Science Fiction for years, but seeing someone appear out of nowhere is quite another thing.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 137

Conquering a New World – WIF Into History

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Why the Conquistadors

Were in

the New World

When Christopher Columbus arrived at Hispaniola (the island now split down the middle between Haiti and the Dominican Republic), he could hardly believe his eyes. With its extraordinary lushness and biodiversity, mighty rivers flowing with gold, and abundance of honey and spices, it was the embodiment of Heaven on Earth, Paradise, the Garden of Eden especially compared to back home.

Even the human inhabitants went about in the nude, with only leaves to cover their genitals. They were also unusually innocent, being entirely without greed. Appearing to lack any concept of property, they shared freely with their alien arrivals?and were overjoyed to receive old broken pottery fragments in return.

Columbus was astounded. If this wasn’t the biblical Garden, he wrote to the King and Queen of Spain, then it must be somewhere nearby. This wasn’t hyperbole either; he was absolutely certain of his claim: Some 5,000 years after God kicked us out, Man had found his way back to Eden.

His plan? To ruin it.

True to form, Columbus immediately set about plundering Hispaniola for its wealth. He built mines, military forts, cities, and farms no doubt devastating forests in the process. Worse, he enslaved the friendly natives to do it for him, threatening to send many back to Europe in chains.

Although he was eventually arrested by the Spanish for his appalling governance of the island, Columbus was far too powerful to lock up. In any case, it did nothing to change human nature. His treatment of the Tano people proved a horrifying portent of the conquest yet to come. Before long, thousands of Europeans followed him across the Atlantic, every one of them hungry for adventure, wealth, and prestige whatever the human cost.

What’s interesting is that while the conquistadors called this strange new continent the New World, they saw everything in terms of the old filtering their understanding and perceptions through Bible stories, classical myths, and outmoded maps and ideas.

Before he stuck a flag in the Garden of Eden, for example, Columbus thought that Cuba was Japan. He even made his crew take an oath on pain of a hundred lashes and having the tongue slit never to contradict his assertion, so insistent was he on imposing the old world on the new.

Likewise, when he came across Antillean manatees, he saw not an exciting new species to classify but a shoal of legendary mermaids (although he did concede they weren’t half as beautiful as in pictures).

Ferdinand Magellan also appealed to mythology when he called the Tehuelche (A’nikenk) of Patagonia giants. Sure, they may have been taller than average, but his encounter reads like a fairy tale: Seeing the first of them singing and dancing on the shore, he and his crew went up to greet them with gifts, cleverly tricking two of the giants into handcuffs and charting a course back to Europe?only for the specimens to die in terror en route.

According to Antonio Pigafetta, a scholar along for the ride, the giants had deep, booming voices and a fear of their own reflection; and they were so tall that even the tallest among the crew only came up to their waists. These giants were later depicted on maps of the New World, alongside mermaids, sea monsters, dragons, and UFOs even though Sir Francis Drake made it clear that they didn’t exist. Having gone looking for the giants himself, Drake concluded they must be a myth and suggested the Spaniards, who probably did not think that ever any English man would come hither to Patagonia to reprove them, had simply made the whole thing up.

But virtually all the conquistadors?Spanish or not were guilty of fanciful projections, imposing time-worn ideas on every square inch of new land, scrutinizing the wide open Western hemisphere through the old narrow lens of the past. Hence they didn’t see the natives as people, they saw them as savages and monsters; and they didn’t see the Aztecs as civilized but as a blasphemous affront to their God.

Basically, the conquistadors were in a world of their own and an often absurd one at that. For hundreds of years they interacted not so much with reality as with a mythological nowhere realm in which nothing was too extraordinary to believe.

El Dorado

In particular, the idea of rivers flowing with gold and other precious metals and gems became a tantalizing trope for the conquistadors?culminating most famously in their obsession with El Dorado.

Spanish for the golden or gilded one, El Dorado originally referred to a man, a fantastically wealthy ruler covered from head to toe in pure gold. The myth most likely originated with the Muisca tradition of crowning a new leader by covering his body in gold dust and rowing him to the middle of a sacred lake surrounded by fires and priests. For the Muisca, the alluringly shimmering metal was a symbol of spiritual power and their connection to the divine. But the conquistadors weren’t interested in ethnology; they were dazzled by the prospect of gold. Hence the legend of the gilded one quickly turned into a city, and the city became an obsession, inspiring boatloads of Europeans to find it.

Among the first to go looking, in 1529 and then again in 1531, was Ambrosius Ehinger, the ambitious German governor of Venezuela. He was aided in his search by hundreds of men including captured Indians and trailed by pigs and dogs. Together, they crossed marshes, rivers, and mountains deep into unknown territory. But in the end, having no qualms about killing or torturing the natives that he came across, Ehinger was slaughtered in return.

Later, in 1541, Gonzalo Pizarro and Francisco de Orellana mounted their own quest from Quito, enslaving natives along the way to help them carry their gear?only to meet with disaster in the end. The same happened to Pedro de Ursa, who was mutinied by his men in 1561.

Even Sir Walter Raleigh was taken in by the myth and twice went in search of the city. Scouring the highlands of Guiana, he ended up battling with the Spanish and losing his son in the process. When he finally returned to England in disgrace, by now an old man, he was beheaded by King James I.

Expeditions for El Dorado were hopelessly open-ended, called off only when they ran out of food (or men) to keep going. After all, they were chasing a mirage across a vast, uncharted continent so there was really no other end in sight. Of course, it didn’t help that any natives they interrogated barely understood what they were looking for, let alone where on Earth it might be, and usually just pointed to the next tribe with a shrug.

Ironically the conquistadors did actually find El Dorado, in one of the first places they looked. In 1536, Gonzalo Jiminez de Quesada conquered the Colombian Cundinamarca plateau, home of the Muisca, and drained their sacred lake. Naturally he found plenty of gold religious offerings from generations of priests and new leaders, but not nearly as much as he wanted. So the conquistadors took their search elsewhere, far from the origin of the myth, and continued to pursue El Dorado until at least 1800, when Alexander von Humboldt finally declared it a sham.

The Seven Cities of Gold

But El Dorado wasn’t the only golden city; there were said to be seven more.

Shipwrecked on an expedition to Florida in the late-1530s, two men (of only four survivors) found themselves wandering the wastes of New Mexico. One was the Franciscan friar and missionary Marcos de Niza and the other a North African slave by the name of Estevanico. Having already been captured by natives and escaped (perhaps explaining the distance they covered), they were keen to avoid any further contact until they reached the nearest safe haven.

But something caught their eye.

Situated on the brow of a roundish hill, de Niza claimed, once he’d made it back to Mexico, was a very beautiful city, the best that I have seen in these parts.? In fact, it looked to be made out of gold. But when Estevanico got too close, he was killed by the native inhabitants and de Niza was forced to run.

It was an irresistible tale. For some, it meant only one thing: The long lost Cities of Gold had been found. Unlike El Dorado, however, these were from the folklore of Spain. When King Roderic lost Hispania to the Muslims in 711-712 AD, he is said to have sent seven of his bishops to found a new one. Sailing across the Atlantic to Antillia one of a number of early phantom islands that was probably the American mainland they each built a city to govern. And then they burned their ships and navigational equipment to ensure they could never go home.

Needless to say, if the legend was true and any of these cities remained, the gold would belong to the Spanish. In 1541, the conquistador Francisco Vazquez de Coronado boldly retraced de Niza’s steps back to the site of the city, accompanied by hundreds of other men and backed by some hefty investments.

Unfortunately, it was only a pueblo, an adobe Zuni settlement that, to a distant observer at sunset, might look a little like it had a kind of glow. It definitely wasn’t made out of gold, though. Plus it had only five neighboring settlements?one short of the fabled seven in total.

The expedition had failed and its financial investors were ruined. It did, however, open up a route to the north, since de Coronado and his men pressed on all the way to Kansas before finally giving up on the search.

The Fountain of Youth

De Niza could hardly be blamed. He was primed to see fantastical things. After all, the shipwrecked expedition that stranded him in the desert in the first place had been in search of the Fountain of Youth a wild and ultimately ruinous goose chase led by Pnfilo de Narvez. Evidently, they’d all been taken in by a rumor about Juan Ponce de Len, who never really looked for the Fountain. Instead, the myth is thought to have been spread as a smear against Ponce de Len’s manhood his quest for eternal youth being a search for an impotence cure.

The Fountain was also mentioned by Pietro Martire d’Anghiera, a contemporary Spanish historian who seems to have believed it was real. In his Decades of the New World, he even gave rough directions:

Beyond Veragua the coast bends in a northerly direction, to a point opposite the Pillars of Hercules  Amongst these countries is an island  celebrated for a spring whose waters restore youth to old men.

This placed it somewhere in the Bay of Honduras, on the island of Boinca or Aganeo. Meanwhile, the Ponce de Len smear pointed more toward his own land of Florida. In truth, though, anyone looking for it, wherever they were, was always on the verge of its discovery. Because whenever the natives were asked for the whereabouts of this miraculous restorative spring, they would have just pointed to water.

The Amazons

Place names were another way for the conquistadors to impose their own version of reality onto the New World. Venezuela (Little Venice), for example, got its name because the stilt houses on Lake Maracaibo reminded Amerigo Vespucci of Venice (Venezia). And it was grouped with other proto-countries (like Colombia, from Columbus) under the Viceroyalty of New Granada, after the city in southern Spain. Indeed, all conquered territories in the New World were collectively branded New Spain.

The Amazon, meanwhile was named for the legendary Amazons, the ancient female warriors from Themiscyra in modern-day Turkey.

Why? Because the conquistadors imagined they lived there.

In 1542, having blustered through the rainforest for almost a year looking for El Dorado, Pizarro and de Orellana’s expedition was in shambles. They’d eaten all their pigs and many of their horses and dogs, and were now facing sickness, starvation, and death. They couldn’t ask the natives for help (on account of all the torture they’d put them through), but they could probably steal something to eat. Desperate not to die in the jungle, Pizarro sent de Orellana and 50 of his men along a wide open river they’d discovered, urging them to come back with food.

But they never did. Evidently the men were a little disgruntled with Pizarro and refused to return upriver to save him, especially from a fate that he probably deserved. (It?s unclear whether de Orellana was in agreement, but he made them all sign a declaration to say that he wasn’t and continued downriver regardless.)

On their meandering way to the sea, they continued to seek El Dorado and the natives kept shrugging their shoulders or more often bracing for attack, having had just about enough of the Spaniards and their conquest. In fact, as they pressed on, de Orellana and his men were shocked to find even women firing arrows from the river bank.

Surely these were no ordinary women, they thought; these women could fight! They were also nude, fair-skinned, and exceptionally skilled with a bow and arrow. They were nothing like the women they knew.

So they had to be the legendary Amazons.

De Orellana assumed their capital must be a few days inland and the riverside villages they passed were outlying vassal states. Of course, when he tortured natives for intel, they only confirmed his suspicions?saying just about anything to make him go away.

In any case, de Orellana and his men were in no mood to go trekking through the jungle in search of this mighty queendom, particularly if it meant certain death. So they sailed on to the Atlantic, returned to New Spain, and got royal backing to settle the region by force. Obviously they never found Amazonia, but they gave it the name all the same. Otherwise, it might have been called New Andalusia, after the region in southern Spain.

The Devil and Prester John

The conquistadors were obviously nuts; that much can be said for sure. But they were really just children at heart vicious, out-of-control, lunatic children, but children nevertheless.

Interestingly, many of their fruitless pursuits?be it for mythical warriors, immortality, untold wealth, or even Paradise itself can be traced to just one earlier myth: the legend of Prester John?s kingdom.

Sometime in the 1160s, long before anyone heard of the ?New World,? a mysterious letter arrived at the court of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus. Purporting to be from one Prester John, a descendant of the Three Magi, it described a vast and otherworldly empire with 72 tributary kingdoms and a strange assortment of inhabitants, including vampires and dog-headed men. It also had a Fountain of Youth, which Prester John claimed could revert anyone to the age of 32, no matter how old they were at the time. He himself had supposedly lived for more than half a millennia by drinking from its waters. There was also a tremendous river, filled with gold and precious gems, that flowed directly from the Garden of Eden. Furthermore, this being a Christian empire, it was entirely free of sin and its people had plenty to eat.

Pope Alexander III, seeing in Prester John a formidable ally for the Crusades, dispatched an envoy to seek out this land. At first, it was thought to be in India, then in Central Asia or possibly Africa. For a while, everyone assumed it was Abyssinia (Ethiopia), which was already a Christian country. Europeans even started addressing the Abyssinian ruler by the name of Prester John, despite his attempts to correct them. They also altered maps of the African kingdom to depict various elements from the letter, including Mount Amara, where Prester John?s sons were allegedly held in captivity.

The real location of his kingdom (if it had one) was never found, but there?s every reason to suspect the New World revived these old hopes.

Obviously, the natives weren’t Christians but neither were they thought to be evil?not entirely. Although Hernan Cort’s described one indigenous leader as a Satanic monster: huge, fat, with hands drenched in blood and blackened with smoke, and a striped black-red face with red mouth and teeth, spilling blood,? this wasn’t the general consensus. The Spanish preferred to see the natives as playthings of the Devil as opposed to the Devil himself, or in other words as souls crying out for salvation.

The existence of the Devil in the New World justified its conquest by the Spanish. So it came to be seen as the Devil’s playground, a New World in mockery of the old. It was the world turned upside down,world inverted by the Devil.

Hence the Aztecs were the inverse of the Israelites, as Satans chosen people against Gods. It wasn’t a New World so much as a black mirror for the old one, a bizarro realm where nothing was new, just darkly topsy-turvy.

This doesn’t excuse their behaviour, of course, but it explains the conquistador mindset.


Conquering a New World –

WIF Into History

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 158

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 158

…Billy can’t let go of that unusual name thing, “Ajax Bannion — do you know that Ajax was a Greek warrior?…

“Reverend Graham, it looks like you found yourself an airplane driver.”

Fanny Renwick should be jumping up and down on her hospital bed, if she were only within earshot of the meeting.

“It sounds like a wonderful opportunity Ajax Bannion,” Constance speaks for the group. “Between Fanny and me, I think we can keep Martin in line.”

“Ajax? I thought your name was Ace,” Graham’s Southern drawl angling toward the truth behind the man.

“Never mind that for now Mr. Graham,” the flyer is already planning for things skyward. “I flew out at O’Hare Field the other day and I saw this slick Basler BT-67, it’s a refurbished C-47 with Pratt & Whitney turbines, a versatile plane with transatlantic capabilities… and I am C-47 certified.”

“I know the Holy Bible inside and out Bannion, but when it comes to airplanes, I defer to those who fly them. If you believe this plane can transport me and my staff, let’s buy it and you can fly it.”

“It was too pricey for my pocketbook, but if you’ve got $65,000 buckaroos?” Ace wants to fly that plane. “I think I can jew the owner down to 60, he seemed hot to trot.”

“Well I need the flexibility to go where I want, when I want and I’d rather have fixed costs for air travel,” he must operate his ministry like a business in order to have order. But he still can’t let go of that unusual name thing, “Ajax Bannion — do you know that Ajax was a Greek warrior in the time of the Trojan War, I believe.”

“No Reverend Graham, my mother really liked the scouring powder.”

“Really, I never would have guessed!” he concludes.

“Why don’t I fly us out there to see that airplane?”

“When Jesus called Peter to join him, he said, ‘Drop your nets and come follow me’. I am certainly no Messiah, but Ajax Bannion, ‘let’s soar on the wings of eagles’.”

And so the die is cast. The Billy Graham Crusades gets its own bird.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 136

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 157

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 157

…it’s hard to keep a good man down…

Willard Libby himself has agreed to a sum for his part in the upcoming Billy Graham Crusades, apart from the others, with the understanding that he has complete scientific control over his part of the sin-smashing festivities. Even though he is but one of several featured guests, he feels it will be good way to get his message out — not to mention stretching his legs and ending his long disappearing act, i.e. institutionalization, death, funeral and all that good stuff.

He has been patiently and silently biding his time, ever since recovering from the effects of frostbite and catatonia. He continues to gain the strength and conviction to move forward.

“I have a exceedingly great need, one that is becoming ever more important to my ministries,” this imposing man of God from North Carolina has the skill of assessing the talents of people he comes in contact with, encouraging them to use their abilities to further God’s Kingdom.

“Mister Bannion, I won’t beat around the bush… well maybe I will… I am using some of that newspaper money to buy my ministry an airplane, to get me from place to place, including the crusades I have planned for London, England. Not only do I require help in picking one out, but I need someone to fly it. Would that be something that would interest a man like you?”

Ace looks over Constance to get a read from her. He is most comfortable with several thousand feet between his feet and the earth, she knows that. She also realizes that chaining him to the ground is counterintuitive; it’s hard to keep a good man down.

Her loving smile is her answer.

Martin Kamen is a voting member of the group and respects Ace’s freewheeling lifestyle, sticking his thumb way up.

“Reverend Graham, it looks like you found yourself an airplane driver.”


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 135

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 156

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 156

Chapter Fourteen

 … AND READ ALL OVER

Because of William Randolph Hearst himself and his fondness for a man he never met, the entire Hearst newspaper empire, all 28 papers from across America, are directed to “puff” Billy Graham and his 1949 Los Angeles crusades. Graham didn’t need too much puffing considering that his California alter calls had blossomed from a compact 3 week event to a full 8 week Holy Ghost revival, already making him a national figure. Rare was the day when he didn’t make the front page.

Video footage from these prayer meetings would make their way onto Sunday morning television, meeting the stations’ FCC religious programming mandate and providing shut-ins with a pseudo church service.

Here in 1951, with “The Old Man” of the American free press nearing 91 years old, he is determined to back a cause which has a far-reaching meaningful legacy. Hearst is rich by any measure and diverting several million dollars to a good young man who shares his patriotism and anticommunist views, as well as a passion for the youth of this nation seems like a natural step. So, despite the protestation of son William Jr., the funds are entrusted to a stranger.

Graham does not turn down the money, why would he, when it is being placed in the hands of a good steward. And he doesn’t forget his friends. His Evangelistic Association is now well funded (by a dying billionaire with a guilty conscience as well the gratefully saved plebeians) and he sees the needs of the people at the bottom of the Libby food chain, specifically Constance Caraway’s efforts on his behalf. (Not to mention Martin Kamen who has directed most of his own grant money to pay for CCPI’s services in the first place). So, he places $100,000 dollars of seed money in Caraway’s care, with the caveat that she distributes it fairly amongst her foot soldiers.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 134

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 155

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 155

…“Hey that’s why we pay AAA for insurance, you know like for exploding garbage cans, accidents with driverless cars…

After accident the scene is medically triaged and processed by police, there is time to decompress. Everybody is in one piece, two such more bruised than the others, Edie with a stiff back and Fanny with a sore shoulder; if you are going to be in an accident, a hospital parking lot is the best choice. As opposed to, a funeral home, which would be skipping the survival scenario.

Eddie Dombroski is wheeled in to see the two new roomies next door in the persons of Fanny and Edie. Suddenly his spirits soar, given the new concerns about the important women joining him in this convalescent covey, a welcome tonic for a mending body.

“I thought I would drive up and visit Eddie… sorry about the car Connie.” Fanny is unnecessarily apologetic.

“Hey that’s why we pay AAA for insurance, you know like for exploding garbage cans, accidents with driverless cars…”

“The paranormal meter needle may seem like it’s bouncing around the red zone folks,” Billy Graham knows that they are not in complete control. “But I encourage you to call out to God when confronted with these confounding situations. I believe He is watching with intense interest and is poised to intervene. But He prefers to be called upon. When we call out for help, it is like an infant baby crying, for food, for comfort, for everything it can’t get by itself.”

Graham takes his leave following those words of wisdom, his own self being marred by the extraordinary experience.

“Like I was saying Fan, I am happy to see you and see you safe and sound. You can tell things have been a little crazy here.” Connie realizes that the unresolved issue is standing in the corner.

“It’s a good thing you have Ace around for protection.”  Do we detect a hint of sarcasm in Fanny’s tone?

fence2

Both sides of the Fence

“Yes, he is a definite upgrade from Martin and William.” Constance has to play both sides of the fence: Ace and Fanny, Fanny or Ace. Her emotions are a muddled minefield, with unresolved issues littered about. One wrong step will certainly injure one or the other.

But when it comes to what really counts, not a soul on the Libby team has a shadow of doubt.

There is no real compromise between right and wrong. Choose a side or the side chooses you. What you think may be a gray area is actually a temporary stop on the way to the truth.

You should never wonder about real truths; in the checker board of life, they will always be marked by either black or white (or so we think).


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 33 (end Ch. 13)

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 154

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 154

…“Do you know that woman… she saved us from unspeakable harm…

She is my partner, Fanny Renwick…

When We Last Left

Constance, Ace Bannion and Billy Graham are departing from their hospital visit of Eddie Dombroski, when they hear a symphony of city noises.

They barely notice the commotion, when another car rushes into their isle, blocking accidentthe path of an oncoming four wheel projectile. The blocking car is t-boned, nearly causing it to roll onto its side.

Ace and Connie dash over to the side of the car where the driver is slumped over the steering wheel. The car, that did the ramming, sits hissing and smoking.

“There’s no driver in that fool car!” Ace is the first to peer through fogged-up windows, while Constance and her nose for trouble, picks up on the telltale odor of singed hair. They both recognize the deep auburn hair in the other sedan.

Graham runs into the lobby to get some really nearby medical help.

“That was no accident Connie. Fanny saved us from being run down,” Both of Ace’s assessments are correct. Fanny’s actions saved them from a car without a driver?

The tall and lanky Graham leads emergency room staff to the scene, who give Fanny the care she needs.

“I do believe that car had bad intentions,” he concludes. “The police should be here any minute to arrest that maniac.”

“There was no driver,” Constance relays the improbable circumstances. She then turns to Ace who is still scratching his head, “Who expects to be run down by a speeding car in a hospital parking lot?”

“Nobody can predict accidents, Connie… and Fanny, out of the blue?”

“No, I had no clue that Fanny was coming back to town, though I bet you that Edie D. knew, probably going along with the surprise.”

“Surprise guys, I just came to save your lives,” Ace puts words into Fanny’s silent mouth.

“Do you know that woman… she saved us from unspeakable harm?” Graham raises his hands to the sky.

“She is my partner at CCPI, Fanny Renwick.”

“Wow, imagine that, just what you need, right when you need it. That’s how God works alright!”

“There is someone else in the back seat,” yells a nurse attending the wreck! “Get another stretcher!!!”

“That is Edie Dombroski, Ace!” She is freaking out. “This is getting g**-damned complicated!”

The tall and normally quiet Graham emphatically opposes her use of foul language, “Please Miss Caraway, do not use the Lord’s name in vain, it offends my ears, but burns His.”

The worst of people can leak out in the heat of the moment.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 133