Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 145

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 145

…If nothing else, the Dark Deceiver will transform this 5046 S. Greenwood into a Halloween favorite…

The physical act of reading is such a bore. If he had not given the Libby Affair his own hands-on flair, (Pentateuch absolutely loves bringing flames with him to the surface) he wouldn’t bother thumbing through this tactile diatribe, crafted by a frail minded human lackey. The loose interpretation: stupid human fictional nonsense.

hook-line-and-sinkerBut he does rifle through the counter-Libby plunder, eating up the fact that Willard Libby’s secret has literally died on the vine. It took five deaths to reach this point, but the end result is that the Great Deception lives on. Countless generations of the world’s students will have their minds filled with evolutionary equations that include six zeroes and covert godless perceptions.

Perception comprises the majority (95%) of reality. It is that minority truth you have to watch out for. As it is with the general public so it is with The Dark Deceiver; he is swallowing the bait left at Argonne, hook, line and sinker.

5046 Greenwood

With the audacity of a victorious leader, Pentateuch has chosen a vacant home just north of the North Campus on south Greenwood Avenue, as near to the University of Chicago as he dare. The building at 5046 is huge, but it has been doomed by the quality of the neighborhood and the trail of inauspicious owners. It has been said that this particular house will always be inhabited by possessively possessed people, given to lustful power.

Pentateuch most certainly qualifies for the above, though he is unaware of how close he is to the Laboratory Schools and the basement hideaway of Martin Kamen and Willard Libby. If nothing else, the Dark Deceiver will transform this place into a Halloween favorite, if not the coldest place on the block.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Perception is 90% of Reality

Perception is 95% of Reality

Forever Mastadon


page 126

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 62

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 62

Chapter Six

 THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

Constance Caraway and Fanny Renwick have been at it for 10 days without a break, well, Eddie's Cousins-001except for a hamburger break, but that did not go so well. And those long car rides, Argonne, Elgin, forth and back, an assault on their brains by way of tales. Eddie’s endless experiences make catnapping impossible and then there are his cousins…

While Martin carefully sorts through Willard Libby’s voluminous paper trail, in an attempt not to let one stone unturned, “which is the Hemingway work that shelters the C-14 theorem?” Libby himself is safely tucked away from the wicked, elusive FM and some days away from blowing that looney-bin.

As 1951 replaces 1950, Connie and Fanny treat themselves to several days at the Palmer House Hotel.

Having the luxury of having their own personal driver certainly makes this off-the-books escapade easier, without having to fight tooth and nail among the morass of people competing for the same rare taxi cab. To his credit, Eddie knows Chicago’s Loop better than any other Checker jockey, foreign or domestic; Eddie speaks English, well his version of it and is a good driver, ‘I ain’t run over no old lady for years,’ he will brag.

The Loop: defined by streets Wells, Wabash, Lake and VanBuren, is pretty much the cultural centre of the Midwestern America. CCPI’s two girl team will endeavor to take in as much of the potentially lethal female combination of shopping and chocolate.

Frango Mints, chocolate truffles sold at Marshall Fields Department Stores, are an early discovery on a leisurely stroll down State Street, but this prominent purveyor of plentiful profligacy actually serves as a double dip; confectionery treats and shoes for feets – sweets for the tummy plus new outfits from head to toe for a night out.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 59

 

4th of July in History

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 Events That

Occurred On

The 4th Of July

For Americans, the 4th of July is one of the most significant dates in history. Yet, what many may not know is that a host of other historically significant events also occurred on this particular day. Here are ten of the most important for world history, arranged chronologically.

10. The Battle of Mantinea (362 BC)

Battle-of-Mantinea

In a battle of Greek city-states, the Thebans, led by Epaminondas, actually managed to defeat the famed Spartans. Epaminondas won the battle while fighting in the front line, resulting in him sustaining a fatal wound. To make matters worse for the “victors,” the two Theban leaders whom he intended to succeed him perished. A dying Epaminondas thus instructed the Thebans to make peace, despite having won the battle. As a consequence, Theban hopes for hegemony faded, while the Spartans were unable to replace their losses. Because both sides had lost their most capable leaders at Mantinea and its aftermath, the battle paved the way for the Macedonian rise as the leading force in Greece. An ascendant Macedon went on to unite most of Greece, in a campaign under Alexander the Great that conquered most of the Persian Empire, including Egypt.

9. A Major Turning Point In The Crusades (1187)

Saladin

During the Crusades at the Battle of Hattin, Saladin defeated and captured Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem. French knight Raynald of Châtillon died in the aftermath, personally beheaded by Saladin. The Muslim victory set the stage for their march on Jerusalem, which they besieged successfully a few months later in the Autumn of 1187. These two victories destroyed the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, and thereby directly resulted in the coming Third Crusade, a major event in world history in which the Holy Roman Emperor joined with the kings of England and France to attempt to retake Jerusalem. They failed and as such, Saladin’s destruction of the Crusader army at Hattin, capture of Jerusalem’s king, and conquest of Jerusalem itself had long-lasting consequences for Middle Eastern history. If somehow Guy would have triumphed instead and prevented Saladin from moving on Jerusalem, the history of the Crusades and, therefore, of Christian and Muslim relations could have been quite different.

8. THE 4th of July (1776)

declaration-of-independence

During the American Revolution, The United States Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Second Continental Congress. Yet, American independence was not immediately recognized by the British. So, in 1778, American forces under George Clark captured Kaskaskia during the Illinois campaign, one of many victories that would eventually encourage the British to acknowledge America’s independence. The result meant that the United States Declaration of Independence would go down as one of the most important documents of American times. At least two dozen countries around the world drew upon this document when drafting their own declarations of independence, in the nineteenth through twentieth centuries. Moreover, that it inspired Americans to successful liberate themselves from British rule was not only a hallmark in notions of human rights, but also in ideas of democracy. Consider the number of absolutist governments in the centuries before 1776 versus the increasing number of constitutional governments in the years afterwards. America’s success inspired many other countries’ elder statesmen, whose words regarding freedom bear obvious resemblance to that established by Adams, Jefferson, and Monroe.

7. The Deaths of America’s Founders (1826 and 1831)

july-4-dead-presidents

Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, died the same day in 1826 as John Adams, second president of the United States, on the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Just a few years later, fellow founding father, and fifth President of the United States, James Monroe passed away on July 4th, 1831. That three of the first five American presidents died on the 4th of July is not only obviously symbolic, it also reflects something of the end of an era for the first leaders of one of history’s most powerful countries. Their passing was not just the deaths of well-known American politicians, but giants of Western civilization whose legacy still appears visually in numerous monuments, films, and even on currency


6. Alice First Entered Wonderland (1862)

alice-in-wonderland

On July 4th, 1862, Lewis Carroll told Alice Liddell a story that would grow into Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its sequels. Wonderland was subsequently published on July 4th, 1865. The number of adaptations of the book and its sequel, in films, television, and video games is enormous. Allusions to Carroll’s stories in popular culture are incredibly pervasive, especially throughout the Anglophone world, but also in non-English speaking cultures as well. Stories about Alice rival the Oz books and the writings of Jules Verne as far as being regularly adapted in various media over the years is concerned.

5. The Turning Points Of the American Civil War Concluded (1863)

ulysses-s-grant

During the American Civil War, Vicksburg, Mississippi was surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant after 47 days of siege, while 150 miles up the Mississippi River, a Confederate Army was repulsed at the Battle of Helena in Arkansas. On the same day, The Army of Northern Virginia withdrew from the battlefield after its loss at the Battle of Gettysburg, signaling an end to the Southern invasion of the North. These three defeats represented the turning point of the American Civil War. They prevented any remaining chance that a European power might intervene militarily on the South’s behalf. They also demonstrated decisively that the South could not successfully invade the North. For the remainder of the war, the South was now entirely on the defensive and, although she held out for two more years, they were two disastrous years that resulted in the deaths of numerous Southerners.

4. The New Colossus Enlightened the World (1884)

Statue-of-Liberty-1800s

The people of France offered the Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World to the people of the United States on July 4th, 1884. The two allies participated in this symbolic act nearly a hundred years after both of their revolutions began in (1776 for America, and 1789  for France.) The erection of the sculpture symbolized the triumph of Enlightenment ideas of liberty, ideas that continue to enrapture large chunks of humanity. Moreover, the magnificence and endurance of the sculpture has led many to refer to it as a “wonder of the modern world,” and “The New Colossus.”

3. The End Of A Dynasty (1918)

tsar-nicholas-II

When Bolsheviks killed future Orthodox saints Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and his family, they effectively ended the Romanov dynasty that ruled the Russian Empires, one of the largest countries in human history after centuries of rule. The event also foreshadowed the end of other European dynasties amidst the cataclysmic First World War. Following the Russian examples, the Habsburgs of Austria, the Hohenzollerns of Germany, and the Ottomans of Turkey were also toppled by their people in rapid succession.

2. Modern Warfare Was At Its Most Massive Scale (1943)

battle-of-kursk

During World War II, the Battle of Kursk (the largest full-scale battle in history and the world’s largest tank battle) began at Prokhorovka Village on July 4th, 1943. The battle resulted in over a million casualties on both sides (Germans versus Soviets) and the loss of over 10,000 tanks, guns, and aircraft. This decisive Soviet victory crippled Germany’s offensive power in the East, in what was Germany’s final strategic offensive on that front, and thus the final realistic chance for them to turn the tide on the Eastern Front.

1. Filipino Independence Achieved (1946)

Philippines-Independence-Day

After 381 years of near-continuous colonial rule by various powers, the Philippines attained full independence from the United States. The independence of the Philippines coincided with a global trend in the years following World War II in which many African and Asian countries, previously colonized by Western powers, achieved their independence after centuries of Western domination.


4th of July

in History

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 20

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 20

…“Who else knows about Libby’s disappearing act?…

“I figured that you worked for the F.B.I, like the guys who were looking for almost the identical records two weeks ago.” The telephone company expert spills a revelation. of sorts.

“F.B.I.?” Constance is startled by this revelation. “Who else knows about Libby’s disappearing act?”

“I’m not sure now,” Martin Kamen relents. The once small trickle is morphing into a significant leak.

“We need to know if these agents were real.” Constance does not trust the altruism of either the federal government cronies or possible cardboard-cutout phonies.

“Maybe this will provide you some answers.” The technician senses the genuine nature of the situation and gives over the names of the FBI agents who came ‘a calling, the day before Libby went missing.

With the addition of the phone records, other interested parties and nice Jewish telephone guy, they have three sources of information that they didn’t have yesterday.

Most of the inbound telephone numbers listed on the green bar sheet originated from the District of Columbia, some local. Outbound digits represent Berkley California, Cambridge Massachusetts and Washington D.C.

“Thank you for your help Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Kamen represents the absolute best interest of Mr. Libby and we are here to get to the bottom of his Image result for hanukkah and christmasdisappearance. Constance Caraway hands him the CCPI business card and her right arm for a handshake, followed by Martin.

Fanny adds, “Happy Hanukkah,” not knowing that it had ended 14 days ago, whereas the whole floor holding Illinois Bell was still decorated in red and green.

“And a Merry Christmas to you, Miss.”

Kimbark 6137Back at 6137 Kimbark, there is a treasure trove of information to sort through.

“Why don’t you go back home Eddie. Keep this under your hat and we will call you when we know our next move.”

“You got it Con!” His sudden familiarity reflects the strange bond that is forming. Fanny gets a hug. Martin gets a slap on the back. “I can be on the road in a flash; the Packard has horsepower to spare.”


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 19

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 17

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 17

…Their gruff cabby, turned chauffeur, for all his tale-telling foibles, is as reliable as they come…

“My name is not Carol, it’s Constance Caraway and Fanny is Fanny, not Sara,” the offender admits.

“I knew something was fishy. Sara, didn’t play pool like no librarian. Oh, I meant Fanny… is that her real name, Fanny?”

“It is short for Philomena. Would you want to be called by that old-fashioned name?”

“I had an Aunt Philomena, huge lady, wore enough Lemon Verbena to kill the tree it came from; could smell her from a mile away.”

Of course Eddie would have a Philomena story. He has a story for any occasion.

“How soon can you be here?”

“One hour and tell that jammoke at the gate that I’m coming. I don’t want him turning my cab inside out!”

“Hey, you’re one of ‘us’ now, cashing in on some of those tax dollars we pay in.”

Punctuality should be high on the list of human intrinsic worth, right up there with honesty and loyalty. If you tell someone you are going to do something, do it. It sounds simple, but as time goes on, the notion of black and white or right and wrong is slowly fading to middling gray and contentious litigation.

Christmas 1950

Their gruff cabby, turned chauffeur, for all his tale-telling foibles, is as reliable as they come. On December 25th 1950, when 99% of God fearing people are knee deep in crumpled wrapping paper and immersed in the aroma of the coming noontime feast, Edward Francis Dombroski III has arrived at Argonne National Laboratory 58 minutes from the time he hung up the phone.

“I hate to be a Scrooge, but I had the feeling someone was watching my house; there was a car with one guy in it sitting across the street. His engine was running, but he hadn’t moved all morning.”

“Maybe he was a visitor at some house on your block,” Fanny speculates about a holiday guest.

Probably not.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 16

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 13

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 13

…Nagging questions; we all have them…

Chapter Two

 SILENCER

Nagging questions; we all have them.

Like:

  1. Which came first, the chicken or the egg?
  2. Which falls faster to the ground, a bowling ball or a ping-pong ball?
  3. Is gray really a color?
  4. How many scientists does it take to guess the age of the universe?
 Answers: 1. no one knows   2. the bowling ball hurts more if it lands on your head   3. no, unless it’s your favorite   4. three, if they live to tell the tale

The last question is different from the others and the only vexing one that concerns Constance Caraway, even though she has strong opinions about the others. When you are starting from the ground floor, it makes no sense to be standing on the roof.

( Cab driver Eddie has been sent home, mercifully, for the remainder of Christmas Eve and may even make Midnight mass with his family at Saint Stanislaus Catholic Parish. He then must explain why he has to return to Lemont Township to pick up a fare early on Christmas Day.)

None of this here all exactly has that holiday feel for anyone involved; while the rest of Chicago  celebrate Christmas and the folks back in Tallahassee, for that matter.

State Street 1950 Christmas

The detective duo is moving at the same brisk pace of their current employer Martin… or whoever came up with the 50 grand… you can take your pick.  He is leading them down into a series of hallways that have a subterranean feel to them. Hansel & Gretel would be leaving breadcrumbs behind so as to find their way back out.

It is entirely possible, from what  has been gathered so far, that Kamen’s colleague Libby seems to have developed a theory or come upon some information that someone definitely does not want to see the light of day.

“You are saying that this is the building, here at the lab, that Willard Libby was seen last?” Constance is piecing together the man’s last known moments.

“Yes. The guard at the east Bluff Road entrance recorded his coming, but not his going.” People at a Top Secret government facility just don’t walk away unnoticed.

“Alright, then! All we have to do is interview everyone who was on the grounds that day,” Fanny’s simple solution may have some holes.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 13

Expensive Toys for Wealthy Boys (or Girls)

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Ridiculously Expensive Toys

for the Rich

(Not me)

When money isn’t an issue, one can indulge in some very cool and very expensive toys. These include gadgets, vehicles, and toys that are similar to things people with average wealth own, just taken to the extreme. There are also some toys that rich people own that most of us have only seen in movies about the future. Then there are other toys for the rich that are just downright bizarre, but no less expensive. But these toys are all very real and for sale, if you can afford their hefty prices. We’d say that with Christmas coming up you could just ask Santa but let’s be real here, no one has been this good this year.

Expensive Toys for

Wealthy Boys