Black History Month 2

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Black History Month 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Page semi-protected
For the song, see Black History Month (song).
Black History Month
US Navy 090226-N-4236E-047 Sailors and Marines watch a dance performance during a Black History Month celebration.jpg

United States Navy sailors and Marines watching a dance performance in celebration of Black History Month
Also called African-American History Month
Observed by United StatesCanadaUnited Kingdom,Germany
Significance Celebration of African-American history
Date Months of February and October
Duration 1 month
Frequency annual

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of theAfrican diaspora. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada[in February and the United Kingdom[3] in October.

 

 History

Negro History Week (1926)

The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week.”[1] This week was chosen because it marked the birthday of bothAbraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.[1]

From the event’s initial phase, primary emphasis was placed on encouraging the coordinated teaching of the history of American blacks in the nation’s public schools. The first Negro History Week was met with a lukewarm response, gaining the cooperation of the Departments of Education of the states of North CarolinaDelaware, and West Virginia as well as the city school administrations of Baltimore and Washington, D.C..[4] Despite this far from universal acceptance, the event was nevertheless regarded by Woodson as “one of the most fortunate steps ever taken by the Association,” and plans for a repeat of the event on an annual basis continued apace.[4]

At the time of Negro History Week’s launch Woodson contended that the teaching of black history was essential to ensure the physical and intellectual survival of the race within broader society:

“If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. The American Indianleft no continuous record. He did not appreciate the value of tradition; and where is he today? The Hebrew keenly appreciated the value of tradition, as is attested by the Bible itself. In spite of worldwide persecution, therefore, he is a great factor in our civilization.”[5]

By 1929 The Journal of Negro History was able to note that with only two exceptions officials with the State Departments of Educations of “every state with considerable Negro population” had made the event known to that state’s teachers and distributed official literature associated with the event.”[6] Churches also played a significant role in the distribution of literature in association with Negro History Week during this initial interval, with the pages of the mainstream and black press aiding in the publicity effort.[7]

Negro History Week was met with enthusiastic response; it prompted the creation of black history clubs, an increase in interest among teachers, and interest from progressive whites. Negro History Week grew in popularity throughout the following decades, with mayors across the United States endorsing it as a holiday.[1]

Black History Month (1976)

The expansion of Black History Week to Black History Month was first proposed by the leaders of the Black United Students at Kent State University in February 1969. The first celebration of the Black History Month took place at Kent State one year later, in February 1970.[8]

In 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial, the informal expansion of Negro History Week to Black History Month was officially recognized by the U.S. government. President Gerald Ford spoke in regards to this, urging Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”[9]

United Kingdom (1987)

Black History Month was first celebrated in the United Kingdom in 1987. This establishment of Black History Month is generally attributed to the work of Ghanaian analyst Akyaaba Addai-Sebo, as well as the Greater London Council.[3]

Canada (1995)

In 1995, after a motion by politician Jean Augustine, Canada’s House of Commons officially recognized February as Black History Month and honor Black Canadians . In 2008, Senator Donald Oliver moved to have the Senate officially recognize Black History Month, which was unanimously approved.[2]

Black History Month 2

On this Labor Day Weekend – “We The People of the Superior States of North America”

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“We The People of the Superior States of North America”

 

“Hereby secede from The United States of America.”

 

Superior States of North America

Solemn Declaration

Let it not be said that disaffected citizens of an existing nation cannot band together, in their like-mindedness, and create a land that is established with the blessing of God, to live together without beholding to a government which insists on ignoring the majority in favor of a raucous and gaudy minority.

  • We do not enter into this union lightly or without regard to its obligation to the greater community of the planet Earth.
  • We stand on the Word of God and adhere to its Superior guidance.
  • We are people of good moral standing, who treat all as equal under the sun and expect the best from ourselves.
  • We take complete and total responsibility for our actions, whether as individuals or together.
  • We shall defend our borders with fervor, respectful of our neighbors (Canada) to the North and (United States of America) to the South.

 

We the citizens of Superior States of North America hereby reject:

  • The blatant ignorance of the Constitution of the United States of America on which the country was established, but has been trampled upon by those currently in power.
  • The aggressive suppression of religious freedom as previously contracted by the Founding Fathers.
  • The inability to enforce the laws of the land as set forth by previous members of the United States’ Congresses.
  • The notion that “political correctness” takes precedence over common sense.
  • The Tax Code has become the personal toy of the Economic Elite, thereby creating an unsatisfactory disparity among the very rich and the very poor.

Within the Superior States of North America:

  • Sound moral code will rule the day
  • Compassion  will rule the day
  • Common Sense will rule the day
  • From each according to his ability, to each according to his need
  • The One True God will rule His people

img024

 

*DISCLAIMER*

This is a postulate set forth by the goals & aspirations of Gwendolyn Hoff and her alone, with the hope of inspiring like-minded people to action. She is not a card-carrying member of the Tea Party and does not endorse continued participation as citizens of the United States of America.

The map as shown is subject to the approval by referendum by the entire individual states of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, North & South Dakota, Idaho and Montana. It is also subject to the approval by referendum of counties bordering the following states, Michigan, Illinois and Wyoming.

Gwenny

Gwenny

 

“I am not a revolutionary, merely disenchanted by the ongoing erosion of our nation’s morals by fringe minorities and 1st Amendment abusers….and all the other Amendments to our Constitution that are being ignored, distorted or misinterpreted.”

writingisfun-damental

“We The People of the Superior States of North America”

Leave a comment

writingisfun-damental

“We The People of the Superior States of North America”

“Hereby secede from The United States of America.”

Superior States of North America

Solemn Declaration

 

Let it not be said that disaffected citizens of an existing nation cannot band together, in their like-mindedness, and create a land that is established with the blessing of God, to live together without beholding to a government which insists on ignoring the majority in favor of a raucous and gaudy minority.
  • We do not enter into this union lightly or without regard to its obligation to the greater community of the planet Earth.
  • We stand on the Word of God and adhere to its Superior guidance.
  • We are people of good moral standing, who treat all as equal under the sun and expect the best from ourselves.
  • We take complete and total responsibility for our actions, whether as individuals or together.
  • We shall defend our borders with fervor, respectful of our neighbors (Canada) to the North and (United States of America) to the South.

 

We the citizens of Superior States of North America hereby reject:

  • The blatant ignorance of the Constitution of the United States of America on which the country was established, but has been trampled upon by those currently in power.
  • The aggressive suppression of religious freedom as previously contracted by the Founding Fathers.
  • The inability to enforce the laws of the land as set forth by previous members of the United States’ Congresses.
  • The notion that “political correctness” takes precedence over common sense.
  • The Tax Code has become the personal toy of the Economic Elite, thereby creating an unsatisfactory disparity among the very rich and the very poor.

Within the Superior States of North America:

  • Sound moral code will rule the day
  • Compassion  will rule the day
  • Common Sense will rule the day
  • From each according to his ability, to each according to his need
  • The One True God will rule His people

 

*DISCLAIMER*

This is a postulate set forth by the goals & aspirations of Gwendolyn Hoff and her alone, with the hope of inspiring like-minded people to action. She is not a card-carrying member of the Tea Party and does not endorse continued participation as citizens of the United States of America.

The map as shown is subject to the approval by referendum by the entire individual states of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, North & South Dakota, Idaho and Montana. It is also subject to the approval by referendum of counties bordering the following states, Michigan, Illinois and Wyoming.

Gwenny

Gwenny

Black History Month 2

Leave a comment

Black History Month 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Page semi-protected
For the song, see Black History Month (song).
Black History Month
US Navy 090226-N-4236E-047 Sailors and Marines watch a dance performance during a Black History Month celebration.jpg

United States Navy sailors and Marines watching a dance performance in celebration of Black History Month
Also called African-American History Month
Observed by United StatesCanadaUnited Kingdom,Germany
Significance Celebration of African-American history
Date Months of February and October
Duration 1 month
Frequency annual

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in America, is an annual observance in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of theAfrican diaspora. It is celebrated annually in the United States[1] and Canada[2]in February and the United Kingdom[3] in October.

 

Contents

[show]

 

History

Negro History Week (1926)

The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week.”[1] This week was chosen because it marked the birthday of bothAbraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.[1]

From the event’s initial phase, primary emphasis was placed on encouraging the coordinated teaching of the history of American blacks in the nation’s public schools. The first Negro History Week was met with a lukewarm response, gaining the cooperation of the Departments of Education of the states of North CarolinaDelaware, and West Virginia as well as the city school administrations of Baltimore and Washington, D.C..[4] Despite this far from universal acceptance, the event was nevertheless regarded by Woodson as “one of the most fortunate steps ever taken by the Association,” and plans for a repeat of the event on an annual basis continued apace.[4]

At the time of Negro History Week’s launch Woodson contended that the teaching of black history was essential to ensure the physical and intellectual survival of the race within broader society:

“If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. The American Indianleft no continuous record. He did not appreciate the value of tradition; and where is he today? The Hebrew keenly appreciated the value of tradition, as is attested by the Bible itself. In spite of worldwide persecution, therefore, he is a great factor in our civilization.”[5]

By 1929 The Journal of Negro History was able to note that with only two exceptions officials with the State Departments of Educations of “every state with considerable Negro population” had made the event known to that state’s teachers and distributed official literature associated with the event.”[6] Churches also played a significant role in the distribution of literature in association with Negro History Week during this initial interval, with the pages of the mainstream and black press aiding in the publicity effort.[7]

Negro History Week was met with enthusiastic response; it prompted the creation of black history clubs, an increase in interest among teachers, and interest from progressive whites. Negro History Week grew in popularity throughout the following decades, with mayors across the United States endorsing it as a holiday.[1]

Black History Month (1976)

The expansion of Black History Week to Black History Month was first proposed by the leaders of the Black United Students at Kent State University in February 1969. The first celebration of the Black History Month took place at Kent State one year later, in February 1970.[8]

In 1976 as part of the United States Bicentennial, the informal expansion of Negro History Week to Black History Month was officially recognized by the U.S. government. President Gerald Ford spoke in regards to this, urging Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”[9]

United Kingdom (1987)

Black History Month was first celebrated in the United Kingdom in 1987. This establishment of Black History Month is generally attributed to the work of Ghanaian analyst Akyaaba Addai-Sebo, as well as the Greater London Council.[3]

Canada (1995)

In 1995, after a motion by politician Jean Augustine, Canada’s House of Commons officially recognized February as Black History Month and honor Black Canadians . In 2008, Senator Donald Oliver moved to have the Senate officially recognize Black History Month, which was unanimously approved.[2]

Black History Month 2

Workplace Skills Lagging

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OECD Skills Test: U.S. Adults Lag

In Practical Workplace Skills

 

oecd skills test

Japan performed well in a new international test that gauges the practical skills of people ages 16 to 65. Americans performed below the international average in math, reading and problem-solving. (Photo by Mike Hewitt – FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images) | Getty

The scores for what’s billed as the world’s most comprehensive adult skills exam are out — and it’s bad news for Americans.

 

Americans performed below the international average on math, reading and problem-solving on the exam, known as the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. U.S. math skills lagged far behind top performers, including Japan and Finland. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, based in Paris, released the results early Tuesday.

“These findings should concern us all. They show our education system hasn’t done enough to help Americans compete — or position our country to lead — in a global economy that demands increasingly higher skills,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement. “While the PIAAC study places our highest-skilled adults on par with those in other leading nations, the findings shine a spotlight on a segment of our population that has been overlooked and underserved:  the large number of adults with very low basic skills, most of whom are working.”

The test is designed to gauge literacy and other skills necessary in the global economy. Statisticians have called it the richest international comparison in cognitive skills and human capital. PIAAC comes from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Andreas Schleicher. Schleichler created the Program for International Student Assessment, one of the most influential tests of 15-year-old students across the globe.

The new test gauges people ages 16 to 65 on how practical skills are used at home and at work. The test surveyed 157,000 adults in 24 countries and regions. Most participants took the test at home, and could use computers to help with answers.

The median hourly wage of those who scored in the top two tiers in literacy was found to be 60 percent higher than those who scored at the lowest wrung. Low scorers had a higher rate of unemployment and were more likely to report poor health and civic disengagement.

 

Americans scored 270 in literacy on average, compared with 296 in Japan. In numeracy, or math, the U.S. scored 253, below the international average, and far behind Japan’s 288.

The oldest U.S. adults were close to the international average, but American adults in every other age group performed far worse than the world average. In a technology-based problem-solving skills, Poland performed the worst, with an average score of 274, compared with the U.S. average of 277 and Japan’s 294.

Poland, which received attention for rapidly rising scores on the Program for International Student Assessment, and Korea, also a high performer, had lower literacy skills than the U.S. on the new test. Poland and Korea had numeracy scores similar to the U.S.

Younger U.S. students were found to have far fewer skills than adults ages 50 to 65 — a group whose high skills are aging out of the workforce. In Korea and Poland, the gap went the other way — older students had fewer skills than younger students, a sign that those countries’ economies stand to be invigorated by workers who are savvier than their predecessors.

“Younger people in Poland, age 16 to 24, have significantly higher basic skills than their older peers,” said Amanada Ripley, a journalist whose book, “The Smartest Kids In The World,” investigates educational differences between the U.S., Finland, Poland and Korea. “That perfectly encapsulates how the U.S. hasn’t gotten much worse or much better, but that’s not what’s happened around the world. “Other countries have changed a lot while we have stood still. That’s the effect of more of these kids going to stronger education.”

That may foreshadow a weakening economy, some said. “The implication for these countries is that the stock of skills available to them is bound to decline over the next decades unless action is taken both to improve skills proficiency among young people,” the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development wrote, referring to the U.S. and England.

 

Paul Peterson, a Harvard University professor, took a similar view. “Our younger population should be doing better than our older population,” he said. “The older population is better educated. And the younger population is entering the workforce.”

 

The U.S. Education Department released a report that analyzed the information. A third report on the policy implications of the results was held up by the federal government shutdown.

Mark Schneider, a vice president at the American Institutes of Research who formerly oversaw statistics at the U.S. Education Department, said he was skeptical of the results. “Japan is the leader, but the fact is its economy has been in the toilet for 40 years,” he said. “What are the lessons here?”

Workplace Skills Lagging