The Night Before Christmas – WIF Holidays

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Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve

Julaftonen by Carl Larsson 1904 edit.jpg

Julaftonen (Christmas Eve), a 1904–05 watercolor painting by Carl Larsson
Also called Christmas Evening
Christmas Vigil
Day before Christmas
Night before Christmas
Observed by Christians
Many non-Christians
Type Christian, cultural
Significance Day or evening preceding the traditional birthday of Jesus
Observances Gift shopping, gift giving, goodwill greetings, Midnight Mass, other church services, meals, preparations for the arrival of Christmas gift-bringers, preparing for Christmas
Date 24 December (Western Churches and Eastern Orthodox churches that use the Revised Julian Calendar), 5 January (Armenian Apostolic Church), 6 January (Eastern Orthodox Churches that follow the Old Julian Calendar and most Oriental Orthodox Churches), 18 January (Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem)
Frequency Annual
Related to Christmas Day, ChristmastideNew Year’s Eve

Christmas Eve is celebrated in different ways around the world, varying by country and region. Elements common to many areas of the world include the attendance of special religious observances such as a midnight Mass or Vespers, and the giving and receiving of presents. Along with Easter, Christmastime is one of the most important periods on the Christian calendar, and is often closely connected to other holidays at this time of year, such as Advent, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, St. Nicholas Day, St. Stephen’s Day, New Year’s, and the Feast of the Epiphany.

During World War I in 1914 and 1915 there was an unofficial Christmas truce, particularly between British and German troops. The truce began on Christmas Eve, 24 December 1914, when German troops began decorating the area around their trenches in the region of Ypres, Belgium, for Christmas. They began by placing candles on trees, then continued the celebration by singing Christmas carols, most notably Stille Nacht (“Silent Night”). The British troops in the trenches across from them responded by singing English carols. The two sides shouted Christmas greetings to each other. Soon there were calls for visits across the “No man’s land” when small gifts were exchanged. The truce also allowed a breathing space during which recently killed soldiers could be brought back behind their lines by burial parties. Funerals took place as soldiers from both sides mourned the dead together and paid their respects. At one funeral in No Man’s Land, soldiers from both sides gathered and read a passage from Psalm 23. The truce occurred in spite of opposition at higher levels of the military command. Earlier in the autumn, a call by Pope Benedict XV for an official truce between the warring governments had been ignored.


The Night Before Christmas –

WIF Holidays

THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 268

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THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 268

…the possibility of intimacy, even to the point of conception, never daring it to cross his mind… well maybe once…

The fair Cerella has piqued Deke’s interest.

There are only two block of rooms atop the towered city known as Eupepsia and it is the place where the McKinneys reside, somewhere down below. You could call them penthouses or you zerocould call them pinnacle palaces, just call this one as Cerella’s; the other being Ekcello’s.

The null-number-zero represents the number of anyone who has ever been at the top of Eupepsia, in the three Earth centuries of Cerella’s young life.

As a planet, not known for their extravagances due in part to lack of covertness’, this level of Eupepsia is dichotomous. No museum or gallery of fine art contains finer material. Deke tries not to gawk at the unparalleled beauty he is seeing… and the girl ain’t bad either.

Things are a tad awkward for a minute or two. As a polite guest, he would ask about this or that and Cerella would skirt the subject, preferring to hone in on their anatomies, specifically how they compare. He has to wonder what the purpose of this social call is.

“As far as I can tell Cerella, everything is in the right place. Do you have a self-esteem issue?” She has him scratching his head, seemingly fishing for compliments, when words like those supposedly mean next-to-nothing to her people.

“I sense that you find me pleasing, correct?”

“Yes.”

“Have you ever fathered a child?”

“… Probably not.”

“Would you like to father a child with me?”

He loved everything about Cerella, yet the possibility of intimacy, even to the point of conception, has never dared to cross his mind… well maybe once

“Would you come, to where I rest, to discover if our bodies function together in that way?”

Leave a tender moment alone. He passively offers his hand waits for her to seal the deal.


THE RETURN TRIP

Episode 268


page 311

Contents TRT

Immortality – On the Road to Forever

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WABAC Machine-001

"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“We are on the hunt for immortality.”
“For you that would be forever X 7.”
“We need to work on your mathematics Sherman My Boy. Let’s see what other people in history have told us about immortality.”

Dalai Lama XIV

“Share your knowledge. It is a way to achieve immortality.”
Dalai Lama XIV

 

John Lennon

“We all shine on…like the moon and the stars and the sun…we all shine on…come on and on and on…”
John Lennon
Isabel Allende

“There is no death, daughter. People die only when we forget them,’ my mother explained shortly before she left me. ‘If you can remember me, I will be with you always.”
Isabel Allende, Eva Luna
Marcus Tullius Cicero

“The life given us, by nature is short; but the memory of a well-spent life is eternal.”
Marcus Tullius Cicero
James  Dean

“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death,if he can live after he’s died, then maybe he was a great man. Immortality is the only true success.”
James Dean
Emily Dickinson

“My life closed twice before its close;
It yet remains to see
If Immortality unveil
A third event to me,
So huge, so hopeless to conceive,
As these that twice befell.
Parting is all we know of heaven,
And all we need of hell.”
Emily Dickinson, Dickinson: Poems
Ambrose Bierce

“Immortality: A toy which people cry for, And on their knees apply for, Dispute, contend and lie for, And if allowed Would be right proud Eternally to die for.”
Ambrose Bierce
Robert G. Ingersoll

“Nothing but truth is immortal.”

Immortality – On the Road to Forever

WIF Puns #26 – The Bright Lights of Fame

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82855391bQuotable Quotes 001

 

Emily Dickinson

“I’m nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there ’s a pair of us—don’t tell!
They ’d banish us, you know. How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!”

Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems

 

1.

The lights were too bright at the Chinese restaurant so the manager decided to dim sum.

2. An electrician is a bright spark who knows what’s watt.
3. The sun was bright on a dry, cloudless morning, but later it waned.
4. Those who study the moon are optimists. They look at the bright side.
5. The brightest day of the week is Sun-day

 

1.

A Hall of Fame recently opened to honor outstanding female soldiers. It was a WAC’s Museum.

2. Derringer had one shot at fame.
3. Dorothy’s dog, of the Wizard of Oz fame, always eats his food entirely – he never leaves any scraps because it’s in toto.
4. Gladys the seamstress was recently inducted into the Pin Pushers Hall of Fame. I guess now she is a status thimble.
5. A hairdresser for a movie star had a brush with fame.

 

The Bright Lights of Fame

My Father Knows the Proper Way

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My Father Knows the Proper Way

 

Edgar Albert Guest

“Father!

My father knows the proper way
The nation should be run;
He tells us children every day
Just what should now be done.
He knows the way to fix the trusts,
He has a simple plan;
But if the furnace needs repairs,
We have to hire a man.
My father, in a day or two
Could land big thieves in jail;
There’s nothing that he cannot do,
He knows no word like “fail.”
“Our confidence” he would restore,
Of that there is no doubt;
But if there is a chair to mend,
We have to send it out.

All public questions that arise,
He settles on the spot;
He waits not till the tumult dies,
But grabs it while it’s hot.
In matters of finance he can
Tell Congress what to do;
But, O, he finds it hard to meet
His bills as they fall due.

It almost makes him sick to read
The things law-makers say;
Why, father’s just the man they need,
He never goes astray.
All wars he’d very quickly end,
As fast as I can write it;
But when a neighbor starts a fuss,
‘Tis mother has to fight it.

In conversation father can
Do many wondrous things;
He’s built upon a wiser plan
Than presidents or kings.
He knows the ins and outs of each
And every deep transaction;
We look to him for theories,
But look to ma for action”

Heavenly Father

 

“Listen to God with a broken heart. He is not only the doctor who mends it, but also the father who wipes away the tears.”

 

My Father Knows the Proper Way

Margaret’s Eclectic Wine & Words

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Margaret’s Eclectic Wine & Words

“The Novel Dames”

 

 

When the mood strikes, or the stars align in their proper place, Margaret Epperson (an absolute genuine article from Jersey) convenes one of the most unique gathering of women I have have ever witnessed, this side of THE VIEW. And I do not make such a claim just because I am a member of this vociferous crew.

But this is a book club like none other. While most literary gatherings focus on the writing of the author or the hidden meaning about this or that plot, these ladies are seeking out the fellowship of like-minded women………..oh and did I mention the wine and food?

And from all walks of life…..

  • Do we discuss the merits of the classics? – Only if it’s a vintage Chardonnay 
  • Have we read the latest book on the Best Seller List? – It’s not that we haven’t read, there’s just more important things going on
  • Can we quote the content chapter & verse? – For about 1/20th of the time between 7P and Midnight
  • How can 20 women talk 20 ways to Friday? – That’s easy when you only see each other once a month or so. Enough time has passed that chances are, 1-2-3 and here comes a baby bump!

And yes we do talk about books!

But we prefer short stories!

Pretty soon we will be calling this THE THIN BOOK CLUB, because thick books get in the way of great conversation.

“Who’s house will we be going to next? Margaret will make sure that each of us volunteers our space and kick our husbands, kids, dogs & cats out for that precious 5 hour slot; where minds meet, girlfriends eat and bottles of wine deplete, all in the name of the written word.”

Gwenny

 

Margaret’s Eclectic Wine & Words

Spring Quotables (and a Poem)

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Spring Quotables

Margaret Atwood

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.”

Ernest Hemingway

“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.”
― Ernest HemingwayA Moveable Feast
Frances Hodgson Burnett

“Is the spring coming?” he said. “What is it like?”…
“It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine…” 
― Frances Hodgson BurnettThe Secret Garden
Leo Tolstoy

“Spring is the time of plans and projects.” 
― Leo TolstoyAnna Karenina
E.E. Cummings

“sweet spring is your
time is my time is our
time for springtime is lovetime
and viva sweet love(all the merry little birds are
flying in the floating in the
very spirits singing in
are winging in the blossoming)

lovers go and lovers come
awandering awondering
but any two are perfectly
alone there’s nobody else alive

(such a sky and such a sun
i never knew and neither did you
and everybody never breathed
quite so many kinds of yes)

not a tree can count his leaves
each herself by opening
but shining who by thousands mean
only one amazing thing

(secretly adoring shyly
tiny winging darting floating
merry in the blossoming
always joyful selves are singing)

sweet spring is your
time is my time is our
time for springtime is lovetime
and viva sweet love”
― E.E. Cummings

Spring Quotables

Drowning in Life

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Langston Hughes

“I went down to the river,
I set down on the bank.
I tried to think but couldn’t,
So I jumped in and sank.”

― Langston Hughes

Ted Hughes

“Nobody wanted your dance,
Nobody wanted your strange glitter, your floundering
Drowning life and your effort to save yourself,
Treading water, dancing the dark turmoil,
Looking for something to give.”
― Ted HughesBirthday Letters

Drowning In Life

Railroads, Trains, People

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Blaise Cendrars

“Tell me, Blaise, are we very far from Montmartre?’WorriesForget your worries

All the stations full of cracks tilted along the way

The telegraph wires they hang from

The grimacing poles that gesticulate and strangle them

The world stretches lengthens and folds in like an accordion tormented by a sadistic hand

In the cracks of the sky the locomotives in anger

Flee

And in the holes,

The whirling wheels the mouths the voices

And the dogs of misfortune that bark at our heels

The demons are unleashed

Iron rails

Everything is off-key

The broun-roun-roun of the wheels

Shocks

Bounces

We are a storm under a deaf man’s skull…

‘Tell me, Blaise, are we very far from Montmartre?’

Hell yes, you’re getting on my nerves you know very well we’re far away

Overheated madness bellows in the locomotive

Plague, cholera rise up like burning embers on our way

We disappear in the war sucked into a tunnel

Hunger, the whore, clings to the stampeding clouds

And drops battle dung in piles of stinking corpses

Do like her, do your job

‘Tell me, Blaise, are we very far from Montmartre?

” ― Blaise CendrarsProse of the Trans-Siberian and of the Little Jeanne de France

Suicide by train is also popular in many developed countries. Without ready access to firearms, suicidal people often turn to trains. —Der Spiegel, July 27, 2011

 

Once it happens you can’t remember
how you started out: innocent,
barreling into the tunnel,
shooting out at each station
like a dolphin out of a dim green pool.
Pneumatic doors inhale open, puff shut,
lock with a solid thump.

Up and down the line, fifty times a day,
it’s a long slow song. You
feel the rumble as much as hear it.
In your dim green trance
the words retain wonder:
Vorsicht, Türe werden geschloßen.
Caution, the doors are closing.

Then the first time:
someone decides darkness will answer,
hides out in the tunnel,
steps out in front of the train
like he knows where he’s going,
steps out at you, dying at you,
knowing you can’t stop in time.

Now each time the doors close,
they seal you in. You are a human bullet
shot into the tunnels, hoping no one
will block the light far ahead,
each station one minute’s reprieve.”
― Karen Greenbaum-Maya

“Trains tap into some deep American collective memory.”

― Dana FrankLocal Girl Makes History: Exploring Northern California’s Kitsch Monuments

Ogden Nash

“At least when I get on the Boston train I have a good chance of landing in the South Station
And not in that part of the daily press which is reserved for victims of aviation.”
― Ogden NashHard Lines

Trains

Six Feet Under

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Anthony Thwaite

“THE BARROWIn this high field strewn with stones

I walk by a green mound,

Its edges sheared by the plough.

Crumbs of animal bone

Lie smashed and scattered round

Under the clover leaves

And slivers of flint seem to grow

Like white leaves among green.

In the wind, the chestnut heaves

Where a man’s grave has been.

Whatever the barrow held
Once, has been taken away:
A hollow of nettles and dock
Lies at the centre, filled
With rain from a sky so grey
It reflects nothing at all.
I poke in the crumbled rock
For something they left behind
But after that funeral
There is nothing at all to find.

On the map in front of me
The gothic letters pick out
Dozens of tombs like this,
Breached, plundered, left empty,
No fragments littered about
Of a dead and buried race
In the margins of histories.
No fragments: these splintered bones
Construct no human face,
These stones are simply stones.

In museums their urns lie
Behind glass, and their shaped flints
Are labelled like butterflies.
All that they did was die,
And all that has happened since
Means nothing to this place.
Above long clouds, the skies
Turn to a brilliant red
And show in the water’s face
One living, and not these dead.”

— Anthony Thwaite, from The Owl In The Tree”

 

Six Feet Under