Greater Galaxy Gateway Gala – WIF Space

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Far-out Facts

About the

Milky Way

Galaxy

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When we think of where we are in the entire universe, our planet is just one a small speck. Even our solar system is one of many in the Milky Way Galaxy, and our own galaxy is one of billions in the universe. It’s hard to image how big The Great Expanse actually is. But with advanced technology, we have a better understanding of what lies in the deepest parts of space. Just in our own Milky Way Galaxy, we have numerous suns, planets, solar systems, comets, black holes, and so much more. Here are 10 interesting facts about our Milky Way Galaxy…

10. Structure And Size Of The Milky Way Galaxy

The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy with a center bulge that is surrounded by four arms that are wrapped around it. Around two-thirds of all the galaxies in The Great Expanse are shaped in a spiral. Our galaxy, as well as our solar system, is always rotating. While our solar system travels around 515,000 miles-per-hour on average, it would still take approximately 230 million years to travel around the Milky Way.

Our galaxy is around 100,000 light-years across and has a mass of between 400 and 780 billion times the mass of our own sun. 90% of its mass is believed to be dark matter.

There is a huge halo of hot gas surrounding our galaxy that stretches for hundreds of thousands of light-years. While it is believed to be as huge as all of the stars put together in the Milky Way, the halo itself only has around 2% of the amount of stars that are found inside of the disk.

And at the heart of the Milky Way galaxy is the galactic bulge which contains gas, stars, and dust that’s so thick you can’t even see into it, let alone to the other side.

9. The Andromeda Galaxy Will Eventually Collide With The Milky Way

The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies will eventually collide into each other, but it won’t happen for a very long time. While it was previously thought that it would happen 3.75 billion years from now, newly conducted research from the ESA’s Gaia mission estimates the collision will take place in 4.5 billion years.

And we may not get hit as hard as previously thought. The new research also suggests that it won’t be a full force collision and rather a “tidal interaction,” which means that no planets or stars will collide with each other.

There is a group of more than 54 galaxies that are named the Local Group, of which Andromeda and the Milky Way are a part. These two galaxies, as well as the Triangulum Galaxy, are the three largest in the group. Andromeda is the most massive galaxy, while the Milky Way ranks second, and the Triangulum is third. Andromeda and Triangulum are both spiral galaxies and are situated between 2.5 and 3 million light years away from the Milky Way.

8. Our Galaxy Is Warped And Twisted Instead Of Being Flat

It’s always been said that our galaxy is flat as a pancake, but a recent study revealed that the Milky Way is in fact warped and twisted. The farther away the stars are from the center of the galaxy, the more they become warped and twisted in an S-like appearance.

Over 1,000 Cepheid variable stars (1,339 to be exact) were used in a study conducted by astronomers from Macquarie University as well as the Chinese Academy of Sciences. These stars became bright and dim in a manner that changed according to their luminosity. The data collected from these stars by using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (or WISE) let astronomers create a 3D map of the true shape of our galaxy.

While the Milky Way is now confirmed to be warped and twisted, it’s not the only one out there that’s like that. While it’s not overly common, astronomers have confirmed that a dozen other galaxies in The Great Expanse have twisted spiral patterns in their outer-most areas.

7. There Are Hundreds Of Billions Of Stars In Our Galaxy

It’s tough to know exactly how many stars there are in our galaxy since the halo around the Milky Way also contains many stars. In addition, the center of our galaxy has a galactic bulge that’s filled with dust, stars, and gas, as well as a super-massive black hole which makes that area extremely thick with materials that telescopes are unable to see through it.

While around 90% of our galaxy’s mass is made up of dark matter, the majority of the remaining 10% is dust and gas, it is believe that only about 3% of the Milky Way’s mass is made up of stars. Some researchers believe that there are approximately 100 billion stars in our galaxy, while others say that there are much more – between 400 and 700 billion.

The European Space Agency’s Gaia mission is mapping out the locations of around 1 billion stars in the Milky Way, so that’s a good start.

6. There’s A Super-massive Black Hole At The Heart Of Our Galaxy

It is believed that most, if not all, galaxies have a super-massive black hole at their center and the Milky Way has one that weighs as much as 4 million suns. Sagittarius A*, which is the massive object located at the center of our galaxy, has been observed for the past several years. Although black holes can’t actually be seen, scientists study them by observing the materials that are orbiting around them.

Scientists wanted to measure the effects of gravity near the black hole so they decided to observe a small star called S2 that orbits deep within Sagittarius A*’s gravity well every 16 years. They noticed three bright flares that traveled around the black hole’s event horizon at approximately 216 million miles per hour (or 30% of the speed of light).

Scientists previously believed that there were only small and super-massive black holes, but there are in fact medium-sized (or intermediate) black holes that are rare but they do exist, and we’ll talk about that in the next entry…

5. There’s Also A Jupiter-Sized Black Hole Wandering Around Our Galaxy

New research indicates that a rare Jupiter-sized black hole is wandering around our galaxy. The data came from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (or ALMA) which includes 66 telescopes that are placed across the Atacama Desert located in the northern part of Chile.

The data consisted of the scientists observing two gas clouds, called Balloon and Stream in reference to their shapes, and what they witnessed during their two-day observation period in May 2018 was that the gas clouds were moving in an odd pattern, like they were spinning around an invisible center in a location where no light was coming from.

The team determined that the object was an uncommon medium-sized black hole that has around 30,000 times the mass of our sun and is approximately the size of Jupiter.

4. Earth Is At The Center Of The Habitable Zone In Our Galaxy

For the last two decades, astronomers have modeled the evolution of our galaxy in order to figure out the four essentials needed for complex life – the existence of a host star; a sufficient amount of heavy elements to create terrestrial planets (like Earth); enough time for biological evolution; and an environment without gamma ray bursts or life-threatening supernovae.

Almost 4,000 exoplanets and nearly 3,000 planetary systems have been confirmed to exist in our galaxy. Hundreds of those star systems have more than one planet that is within the Galactic Habitable Zone (or GHZ) and there is no doubt that many more are out there just waiting to be discovered.

And of course Earth is located at a perfect spot near the center of our galaxy’s GHZ. What’s even more interesting is that according to astrophysicists at the Australian National University, the GHZ only has about 10% of all the stars in the Milky Way.

3. There Are Almost 4,000 Exoplanets In Our Galaxy

Planets that are beyond our solar system are called exoplanets and thousands have been discovered by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope over the past several years. These exoplanets can be any size, with some being rocky and others having icy surfaces.

The Kepler Space Telescope worked to find these planets from 2009 until 2018. During that time, it discovered 2,682 exoplanets with over 2,900 possible candidates that are still waiting to be confirmed. And according to information found on NASA’s website, a total of 3,916 exoplanets (including the ones found by Kepler) have been confirmed.

Kepler ran out of gas and was officially decommissioned in November 2018. However, a new spacecraft, called the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (or TESS) has taken its place to find new planets. It was launched in April of 2018 and is planning to scan around 85% of the sky in its two-year mission.

2. So Far, Almost 3,000 Planetary Systems Have Been Discovered In Our Galaxy

Another important piece of information presented on NASA’s website is that 2,917 planetary systems have already been discovered. One of those planetary systems which is very similar is our own solar system is called Kepler-90 which is located approximately 2,500 light years away from us towards the Draco Constellation.

Kepler-90 has eight planets which is the same number of planets located in our solar system. Other similarities between the two solar systems are that Kepler-90 has a G-type star which is comparable to our own sun; it has rocky planets like ours; and it has other large planets that are similar in size to Saturn and Jupiter.

One major difference between the two solar systems is that Kepler-90’s planets all orbit very close to their sun which would indicate that they may be too hot to sustain any type of life. But with further research, more planets could potentially be discovered that orbit at a further distance.

1A. Milky Way Is Only One Of Hundreds Of Billions Of Galaxies In The Universe

According to data collected from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, it was previously thought that there were around 200 billion galaxies in the universe. However, it is now believed that there are at least ten times more galaxies out there in space.

Some experts believe that around 90% of the galaxies in the observable universe are too far away and even too faint to see with our telescopes. Thankfully, the James Webb Space Telescope (or JWST) is scheduled to be launched in early 2021 which will help to see these faint galaxies and perhaps uncover even more.

Some of the tasks the JWST will conduct will be to find out what happened after the first stars were formed following the Big Bang; finding out how galaxies were formed and assembled; the birth of stars and proto-planetary systems; and understanding the atmospheres on distant planets to find out if they are habitable and can sustain life.

1B. What WIF Calls the Universe

What most folks refer to as the “Universe”, the rest of the fictional civilizations out there call it “The Great Expanse”, at least that is how  “I-Gwen” describes that wondrous-wide Creation that God set in motion. If giving God credit offends your sensibility, the “Big Bang” happened.

Whatever it is called or whoever gets the credit, it certainly boggles our little minds and this author is eternally fascinated.


Greater Galaxy Gateway Gala

WIF Space

Great Mischief in the Great Expanse – WIF Space

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Most

Terrifying Places

in

the Known Universe

Like Great Cthulhu, who lies dead and dreaming in the sunken city of R’lyeh, or the nuclear chaos–the blind idiot god–Azathoth, in HP Lovecraft’s stories and other cosmic horror stories, the universe is home to planets and celestial objects that defy our expectations and exhibit truly horrific environments–where humankind was surely never meant to voyage.

10. Trappist-1

Imagine that you stand on the surface of an alien world, where the sky burns dark and crimson, oceans of magma stretch from horizon to horizon and volcanoes constantly resurface the planet. A red globe of light rises slowly above the horizon, but unlike Earth’s star, it barely provides any light at all. Five other worlds appear as moons, forever drifting in the dark, threatening one another in their eternal celestial dance. Brilliant auroras fill the sky, burning and caressing the atmosphere, irradiating the surface and anything that dares to draw breath.

The Trappist-1 system may be the best hope for finding an Earth-like planet yet, with each of its seven planets being very Earth-like. Scientists think that many, if not all, have some sort of atmosphere and feature liquid water.

But—there’s always a but, isn’t there?—it may also be terribly inhospitable.

So far, evidence suggests that these worlds orbit their parent star peacefully. But, if our system is any indication, orbits are rarely static. Earth itself has at times exhibited a more elliptical orbit (which has been used as a possible explanation for our many ice ages).

A bigger threat to emerging life and habitability in the Trappist-1 system, however, may be a process called magnetic induction, causing many of the innermost worlds (even those in the habitable zone) to have oceans of flowing magma (like Io, which orbits Jupiter).

There is also the fact that super-cool dwarf stars like Trappist-1 are extremely active. They flare more than our star does, and this could prove to be particularly dangerous for the planets that orbit at such close proximity.

Trappist-1 is also a very dim star. Super cool dwarfs don’t emit much visible light, so processes like photosynthesis may be impossible. So, we can probably rule out rich vegetation.

9. Wasp-12b Exoplanet

A black shape transits across the surface of a star not unlike our own. It glows with an eerie iron red halo as its parent star devours it, the tidal forces squishing it and inflating the atmosphere until it’s nearly the size of Jupiter.

Welcome to WASP-12b. Deep in the Auriga constellation. Where the tidal forces of its dwarf star parent are so great, they stretch the planet into the shape of a football, and diamond is as abundant as limestone is on Earth. Despite how close the planet is to its star, it emits almost no light, making it one of the darkest exoplanets ever discovered.

But it won’t be around for long, because its host star is devouring it.

8. PSO J318.5-22

In the depths of interstellar space, a lone rogue burns on through the darkness. From within its raging dust clouds, there is no star in the ever-night sky. But, even with no star to warm its skies, somehow, its temperatures rage on into the 800s, and it rains rocky debris and pure iron.

PSO J318.5-22 is a rogue planet, a lonely, wandering jovian class world with no star to call its home. It exists some 80 light years away in the constellation capricornus. The planet is thought to be six times larger than Jupiter, and, surprisingly warm for a free-floating object.

The object is part of a group of stars which formed almost 12 million years ago. That’s relatively recent in cosmic terms. Scientists aren’t quite sure how objects like these end up floating all by their lonesome in the depths of interstellar space.

7. Mira: A Real Shooting Star

Imagine that you wake up in the middle of the night. There’s an odd glow visible from your bedroom window. You go outside and stare up at the night sky. You see a new, bright object in the night sky. At first, you think it’s a comet. But, soon realize that it’s not. It’s a star, shedding its material much like a comet.There’s just one problem, your world is in its way.

You’ve heard of so-called “shooting stars,” which you’ve probably also learned are nothing more than meteoroids burning up in our atmosphere. But what if we told you there were real shooting stars out in the blackness of space?

With a tail of cosmic gas and debris that stretches 13 light years, Mira is quite special. It’s actually part of a binary system, and its partner (Mira-B) feeds off of its stellar partner. A bow shock forms in front of the star, as it swallows up cosmic dust and gas and anything unlucky enough to get in its way.

So, what’s so terrifying about this? Imagine if our world were in its way.

6. Wandering Black Holes (Black Holes)

You’re looking through a telescope, focusing on Jupiter. You notice something warping the stars around the planet’s bright surface. Then, you see a large trail of gas and dust stretching from Jupiter to a dark spot, hurtling through space toward you.

The earth rumbles, and you realize that it’s all over for humanity.

Wandering black holes are terrifyingly common in our Milky Way Galaxy. Scientists have found two possible Jupiter-sized black holes in gas clouds using ALMA, a set of 66 telescopes spread throughout the Atacama Desert in Chile. And it’s thought there are close to 100,000,000 black holes in our galaxy alone.

But what would happen if such a black hole came close to us? Well, unfortunately, if a wandering black hole got anywhere near our star system, the results would be disastrous, throwing the orbits of every planet, even our Sun, into utter chaos. The most terrifying part? We wouldn’t see it coming until Jupiter and the other gas giants ended up getting their atmospheres gobbled up by the black hole’s immense gravity, creating an accretion disk.

5. Supermassive Electric Current

From the bright core of a spiral galaxy shoots a massive jet of glowing material. Getting any closer than 150,000 light years would mean certain death due to immense radiation and the strongest electric field in the universe.

Equalling about a trillion bolts of lightning, the cosmic jet resulting from the supermassive black hole at the core of galaxy 3C303 is the strongest electric current ever detected in the known universe. Scientists aren’t sure why the electric field is so powerful but theorize that it has something to do with the jets created by the supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s center.

Considering that the Milky Way is only estimated to be about 100,000 light years in diameter, that’s quite impressive, if not terrifying.

4. Hand of God

From the depths of space, the apparition of a ghostly hand reaching up to grab the corpse of a star that went supernova. It flashes with dangerous x rays, filling the pulsar cloud that makes up the hand every seven seconds.

Created by a pulsar wind nebula, the hand formation that the pulsar creates is a mystery scientists are still trying to solve. If our Earth were too close to a pulsar like this, and in the direct path of its gamma ray and X-ray jet, all life on Earth (except extremophiles in caves and near volcanic oceanic vents) would likely go extinct.

Pulsars like the one creating the Hand of God nebula are actually rapidly rotating neutron stars, which emit pulses of intense radio waves and electromagnetic radiation. It has been suggested that objects like these, which emit gamma ray radiation, if pointed directly at the Earth, could cause a mass extinction event.

3. The Boomerang Nebula

From within the hourglass nebula, you freeze almost instantly, drifting through space on a collision course with a dying star.

A proto-planetary nebula created by a dying red giant star 5,000 light years from Earth. It’s the coldest object in the known universe. The boomerang nebula’s average temperature is a minus 458 degrees Fahrenheit (or 1-degree Kelvin). For reference, the coldest place on Earth (located in Antarctica) registers minus 133.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

The team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA)–located in the Atacama desert in northern Chile–suggest that the extremely low temperatures may be caused by the collision of a small companion star, plunging into the dying red giant’s surface. The rapid expansion of gas caused by the collision is likely what’s causing the extreme decrease in temperature.

2. RXJ1347

Assuming you had a ship that could get you to this galaxy cluster, it would likely melt within seconds of entering the hottest place in the known universe.

gas cloud surrounding a galaxy cluster in the constellation Virgo is the hottest place in the known universe. It’s thought that this massive celestial heat storm was produced by two galaxy clusters colliding, creating one of the most violent phenomena in the universe. Contained within a 450,000 light year wide area, the cloud shines like a spot light. What’s more terrifying is that the custer is swimming with X-rays.

Now imagine if Earth was contained in that cluster. How long do you think our planet would last?

1. Boötes Void (The Great Nothing)

Imagine that you’re falling through space. You try to orient yourself, but every which way you turn, all you see is darkness. Up is down, is right, is left. No matter where you look, there are no stars, no planets, nothing but pitch-black nothingness to inform your senses. Imagine now, that this is all you’ve ever know, from the dawn of your existence.

A true abyss from which nightmares are spawned.

Boötes Void is the largest void in the known universe. It’s nearly 330 million light-years in diameter, and its existence is somewhat baffling. Most of the universe appears to be sponge like, expanding uniformly, but the presence of such a void, where thousands of galaxies could (or should) easily fit, raises many questions about the origins of the universe.

Answers, such as TYPE 4 or 5 alien civilizations, capable of harnessing the light and energy of their galaxies, to dark energy or other phenomena, have been proposed as potential explanations for Boötes Void. Some even think that it may be the very epicenter of the Big Bang, and others think that its very existence refutes the big bang as a whole.

The fact stands, that Boötes Void is the largest thing ever discovered within the known universe. If the Earth were to be placed at its center, we wouldn’t have known that there were even other galaxies until the 1960s.


Great Mischief in the Great Expanse

– WIF Space

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 84

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 84

…“This stuff is going to be a tough-sell don’t you know,” Martin is sympathetic to the ongoing science versus religion debate…

As work can be the best therapy, so does Willard Libby guide Martin Kamen through the cherished details of his, still to be revealed to the world, discovery that the actual age of planet Earth is far less than the 4.5 to 5 billion year range that is broadly accepted.

Pentateuch refers to it as The Great Deception, for the simple reason that when mankind believes they have all that extra time to operate, there is no motivation to contemplate their mortality.

But even among the broader Christian community, Libby will encounter mountainous doubt about a shorter period of planetary existence. It is such a radical departure from what they have been taught.

Billy Graham had described it to his Tolentine quizmaster this way: “The Lord our God created the Earth with a patina, an aged look beyond its actual maturity.”

Willard Libby’s “half-life” formulae works great on organic material, but the very same decay of carbon in non-organic material is not as easily calculated.

“When God created the Universe, he only made it look like it had been around for nearly forever. Human beings have made a science out of minimizing God’s abilities and wonders.”

Willard had understood what the young preacher was spouting; the notion that a creator had the omnipotent power to make things appear in ways only He can comprehend.

Talk about a transformation. It was not all that long ago, perhaps 5 years that Libby would have argued against the very facts that he has happened to literally stumbled upon.

“This stuff is going to be a tough-sell don’t you know,” Kamen is sympathetic to the ongoing science versus religion debate.

“I have the facts to back it up, Martin, right down to the molecular level,” Willard opens up his treasured paper, thumbing to the section where only someone as versed as a researcher could possibly take hold of and make his own. For the first time he sees the evidence for himself, through a radioisotope. There laid out in front of him are the updated facts, from a completely new perspective.

That there may be authorship of the Universe is a humbling notion.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 76 (end Ch. 7)

The NULL Solution = Episode 177

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The NULL Solution = Episode 177

…This appears to be a starfield for feckless foreigners, having all the feel of a jail…

“We will return to Sexta A and reassess our strategic position.”

It is not easy turning around a mobile planetoid {just ask any self-respecting comet}, especially when you cannot find your way. If it is possible, Collapsar’s trail has turned ice cold.

“We appear to be in a singular galaxy. Sexta A or any other galaxies, known or otherwise, have ceased to exist.”

Related imageŽupzïð would issue an order if he had a clue. “You have been in this place for a long period of time. Is there anything that you do recognize?”

O is here, but it looks different.” A shiny black version of Lorgan has been lurking all along. When you peer at this version, the only things you see are the trillions of stars “There is evidence that other worlds have been wandering within these boundaries.”

This appears to be a starfield for feckless foreigners. It has the feel of a jail. Prison planets are scattered all over the “regular” universe, so the concept of confinement is far from foreign.

“The Great Expanse has no boundaries.”

“This one does. There are no stars at the end. ⃝    will not allow us to go no further.”

I am the how & why that blocks your way

Prove your worthiness and the light will show the way back

“Another stupid riddle,” apparently the Ÿ€Ð do not have aptitude or the appetite for them. “Keep a lookout for that ridiculous rotating beam from the Terran system. That will steer us in the right direction.”

What about the riddle, pilgrim?

Lights out this way are few and there is little detectable heat generated by what stars there are. It is like they have been hung in the sky, held in place by invisible strings. Harmonia’s lighthouse is nowhere to be seen.


The NULL Solution =

Episode 177


page 173

The NULL Solution = Episode 170

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The NULL Solution = Episode 170

Lorgan is the lever, Mars is the load and Earth is the fulcrum; Universal accordance is the goal…

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

Harmonia

 

Harmonia permanently established – Stardate 2057.00
Part 1 of 2

If Lorgan is the lever, Mars is the load and Earth is the fulcrum; Universal accordance is the goal.

The blinding light of hope has shone to the edge of time. The lighthouse on Mars becomes known at a rate 3 gazillion times faster than SOL. Like insects to a flame, civilizations from infinity and back, come to see for themselves.

Instead of the baffling calculation combo of number and word {that has been correctly deciphered by a Null}, a specifically vague invitation is piggybacked to the sweeping beam:

The time has come for all empires to unite in the climate of harmony and collaboration. The fruit of hostility is like the dirt of a dead world. The rewards of unity are numbered by the galaxies new and old. From before time began, I have observed the rancor of My children and it saddens me. I Am, therefore I Will Be Always. To those who have seen the Light, come. To those who ignore the Light and this message of peace, I know you not.

No matter the language, though restricted to this dimension, the message projects outward, the meaning is clear.

⃝    is established as a formidable force in the continuing process of intergalactic development. Not requiring of worship or tribute, ⃝    asks that this new order coexist in a manner worthy of respect. Whether it be individuals on individual planets or worlds in already established territories, ‘Get along or I will be along.’ is the ⃝    order of the day.

An ever-widening circle is sprouting on Mars. Once upon a time, travelers wondered whether this nondescript planet once sustained life. Maybe it did, maybe it did not, but one thing is for sure, it is currently teeming with representative participation from hundreds of worlds

Harmonia Part 1

The NULL Solution =

Artist conception of Mars by Kevin Gill

Episode 170


page 166

The NULL Solution = Episode 128

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The NULL Solution = Episode 128

…In the realm of cause & effect, the McKinneys seem to be the lowest common denominator…

Skaldic has been there for the briefing. He breaks his silence with words of comfort for his friend, “With that menace out of our way, let us concentrate on solving that brainteaser that has vexed us so.”

It is with that spirit of a common end that Skaldic first expounds a theorem that has dogged him {and just about every semi-intelligent creature and A.I. in the Great Expanse} for some time. In the realm of cause & effect, the McKinneys seem to be the lowest common denominator.

“I am not exactly sure how, but I think you and your family figure into the Harmonia Query. If I understand the timeline correctly, it was not until you and your mate arrived here, that galactic normalcy began to tilt…”

“Being dragged ten light-years away from Earth was not exactly in our family plan. We would have been content colonizing Mars, as opposed to star hopping to parts unknown. We prefer to be closer to family and friends, you know, that kind of thing.”

Time for a Null analogy:

Image result for dominoes gif“You taught me the game of dominoes, remember? After I defeat you again and again, you line up the pieces in a winding row and seem to get excited watching the dominoes topple each other one-by-one.”

“I let you win. What’s your point Skaldy?”

“You represent the first domino Sammy Mac. Do I need to tell you what happens next?”

“Yeah, I get up and watch the mayhem. Are we having fun yet?”

“Consider the Harmonia riddle as the last domino. It still stands tall and straight,” Skaldic makes his point.

What on earth do the McKinneys, a double nine set of dominoes and a Cryptomanic Null have to do with finding the key to Intergalactic Unity?


The NULL Solution =

Episode 128


page 127

The NULL Solution = Episode 120

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The NULL Solution = Episode 120

INTERSTELLAR NEWS is an obscure news outlet based somewhere East of Nowhere…

By now, the label Lorgan is the well-known and accepted name for the ⃝    , widely documented in every corner of the Great Expanse. Rumors get legs, gossip is the fuel and frustration is the outcome of it making its usual unannounced appearance in your “hood”.

O                                                      O

                                O                                                      O

O                              O

Like a fly in the kitchen, Lorgan travels with impunity. There is not a lifeform that is exempt from it; all that creepeth on the ground or flieth in the air. To infinity and beyond, the enigmatic sphere reflects “whosoever’s” image back at them. What you see depends on who you are.

Even if you are not looking, it is there, doing whatever “it” does.

  • For some planets, it is an evolutionary nudge beyond the cellular stage.
  • It could be a denied attempt at unnatural selection; the dominance by one specie over another.
  • Setbacks on Eridanus and Seljuk are subtle reminders that you are never too old for correction.
  • Thwarting the United Korean Peninsula on Earth is swift and conclusive.

An overriding theme is taking shape, now that the gleaming silver sphere is getting widespread attention. There is a communal course that is being enforced and there seems to be nothing any what, where, why or how can do about it.

Act out, ignore or be ignorant and you get the same result and Lorgan is in no particular hurry.


WE ARE BREAKING IN TO YOUR REGULAR PROGRAMMING TO BRING YOU A SPECIAL REPORT FROM INTERSTELLAR NEWS: “Collapsar Axis, which has been described as “The Pied Piper from Sexta A” is being followed by the object so-named Lorgan. Though its estimated multitude {or so} occupants have not been threatened, it’s Supreme Commander, Župzïð the Last, tells INTERSTELLAR NEWS that Collapsar will not be deterred from its quest to find out just who destroyed their fleet in the Terran Quadrant of the Milky Way Galaxy — Stay tuned for further updates.”

INTERSTELLAR NEWS is an obscure news outlet based somewhere East of Nowhere.


Nobody need tell the Ÿ€Ð that their 10 Million Cubic Cubit mobile planetoid is being tailed. One moment O is there, then gone for many moments, only to resume its spot, safely at the rear. There is not a tail long enough to swish it away.

Patience is being forced upon the Ÿ€Ðian ark; a melting pot continually filled by one malcontent waif after another. One & all have sworn blind allegiance to a new-world-order {i.e. odor}.

When one galaxy is as good as the next, it doesn’t matter where you are going.

Perhaps not coincidentally, every time Župzïð is tempted to be unnecessarily aggressive along the way, he cannot. Slaps on the hand prove to have a cumulative effect. A Lorgan enforced mischief-free zone heralds its coming, status quo abides in its wake.


The NULL Solution =

Episode 120


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