Highway to Hell – WIF Myth & Legend

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I-4 Dead Zone:

America’s Most

Haunted Highway

The Interstate 4 highway stretches over 132 miles through Florida, and is frequented daily by those on their way to work or visit friends, and certainly it’s a travel hub for those vacationing in the Sunshine State, perhaps on their way to Disney World.

While the I-4 is a very well-traveled highway, there’s one spot nicknamed the “Dead Zone” where people need to be especially careful. This quarter-mile stretch of the highway has been the location for many car accidents, electronic malfunctions, and even ghost sightings.

Why is this seemingly cursed spot on the highway so dangerous for drivers? Perhaps it’s because it was built over graves, and a disturbed grave site is the perfect recipe for strange things to happen. Or maybe it’s just a coincidence that so many people have crashed their vehicles there, although it’s a pretty frightening coincidence. The graves are under one of the eastbound lanes of the I-4, before you get to the south end of the St. Johns River Bridge, but we’ll let you decide whether it’s just a coincidence… or if there’s a more sinister aspect to the stories. Let’s take a look at the strange and eerie part of the Interstate 4 highway known as the Dead Zone…

The Dead Zone

Around the halfway point between Daytona and Orlando is a very dangerous spot for drivers. The Interstate 4 highway passes over the St. Johns River in Seminole County, and at the south end of the interstate bridge is a quarter-mile section known as the “Dead Zone.”

The Dead Zone is known for the exceptionally high amount of accidents that have happened there. Oddly enough, on the first day that the new Interstate 4 was opened, a tractor-trailer carrying frozen shrimp suddenly lost control and jackknifed directly above the disturbed graves of immigrants who had died from yellow fever.

While there isn’t an exact number, it is believed that anywhere from 1,500 to over 2,000 accidents have happened there since the opening of the highway in 1963. Unfortunately, many of those accidents resulted with death. In fact, around 440 accidents happened at that location between the 1999 and 2006. And in just a 24-month period between 1995 and 1997, there were a staggering 44 car accidents that resulted in 65 people being injured.

Many of the locals will not drive on the Dead Zone of the I-4, and instead take a much longer and more roundabout way to get to their destination.

The History Of The Location

In the years before the 1880s, the location was nothing but wilderness with a sand road that ended up at an area that was equipped with a hand-operated river ferry. Then in 1886, a railroad station was built and there was an attempt to begin a Roman Catholic colony named St. Joseph’s Colony. The owner of the land, Henry Sanford, thought that he could get some German immigrants to fill the colony. But after just four immigrant families moved there, Sanford’s efforts to establish a thriving Catholic colony ended.

One year later, there was an outbreak of yellow fever that claimed the lives of one immigrant family. There was so much fear that others would contract the fever that the four bodies were taken into the woods and burned. The priest who was also living in the colony had to go to Tampa to minister to yellow fever victims there, but unfortunately three days after arriving he also passed away from the fever. With the priest dead, there wasn’t anyone who could perform the last rites to the family of four who had passed away and they were buried without any ceremony.

By 1890, the colony had developed into a rural town named Lake Monroe. When a man named D.V. Warren bought the land north of the railroad, he cleared the area so he could do some farming, but he left the cemetery untouched. The graves looked like an island in the middle of the cultivated farmland and, over time, the names on the four wooden markers were erased by nature. Warren sold his land to Albert S. Hawkins in 1905.

Hawkins had leased his land to other farmers but he always asked them not to touch or mess with the burial site. However, one farmer ignored the warning and attempted to remove the wire fence that was around the graves. His house mysteriously burned down that exact day.

Hawkins had a home that was located at the edge of the field, and one day it burned down when he tried removing the rotting wooden markers for the graves. Since his wife was convinced that the fire was because of his tampering with the gravesite, Hawkins immediately replaced the markers.

However, after the Hawkins’ new house was built, they began experiencing strange things in their new home, especially with the children’s toys. A small rocking chair would begin rocking all by itself, and several toys would move on their own. Even his neighbors told him that they had seen strange lights around the gravesite at night. Perhaps this is why many of the locals nicknamed the area the “Field of the Dead.”

Another chilling event happened in the early 1950s when a young boy was disturbing the graves, and the following night he was killed by a drunk driver. The driver was never identified or caught.

Hurricanes And The I-4

The government bought the property in 1959 for the purpose of building Interstate 4. The four graves were supposed to be relocated to another area, but never were. The surveyors of the land decided that the graves were very old and “felt it was best, as well as beneficial to construction and time issues to ignore the graves and build over them.” One of the engineers was even quoted saying, “It’s not an ancient Indian burial ground, they’re just a few old bones.” Their choice not to relocate the graves would be one of the worst decisions they could ever make.

In September 1960, dirt was poured on top of the graves in order to raise up the highway. At the same time that the fill-dirt was being poured on the graves, a powerful storm named Hurricane Donna was hammering the southern region of Florida. The hurricane was on its way to the Gulf of Mexico but suddenly and unexpectedly changed course toward the exact location where the new interstate was being built. In fact, the eye of the hurricane passed directly over the gravesite at exactly midnight on the night of September 10, 1960. The damage from the storm delayed the construction of the highway for almost a month.

Then in 2004, another major storm named Hurricane Charley took almost the exact same route Hurricane Donna had. Hurricane Charley passed directly over the graves of the four deceased immigrants, and what’s even more eerie is that there was construction happening around the graves right before the hurricane passed over. It seemed as though something – or someone – didn’t want anyone disturbing the resting place of the four deceased immigrants. Researcher and author Charlie Carlson wrote a book called Strange Florida, and has talked about the hurricanes:

“Charley followed almost the same route as Donna. They referred to Charley as the ‘I-4 Hurricane.’ Strangely enough, there was construction going on around the graves. The land where the graves are was being disturbed again. It was almost like a repeat of Donna.”

There have also been a high number of tornadoes that have ripped through the area, following the route of the Interstate 4.

An Eerie Coincidence

It’s definitely a strange coincidence that two hurricanes seemingly made sure that they hit the exact location where the graves were being disturbed by construction, as well as the many tornadoes that have traveled up Interstate 4, as if there was some sort of force or magnet attracting them to the location. But there is another coincidence that is absolutely bone-chilling and deeply disturbing.

At the beginning of this article, we mentioned that there were 44 car crashes that ended up injuring a total of 65 people between 1995 and 1997. If you take a moment to do the math, when you add up 44 and 65 you get a total of 109. In 1996, it had been exactly 109 years since the four members of the immigrant family died in 1887. Now that’s an incredibly eerie coincidence.

Paranormal Experiences

In addition to the countless car crashes, deadly tornadoes, and strong hurricanes, Interstate 4 is also known as the most haunted highway in America, especially in the quarter-mile Dead Zone.

There have been many strange occurrences and paranormal activity associated with the highway. One common claim is that cell phones, radios, and CBs stop working when people drive through the Dead Zone. Others have claimed to have heard static or the sound of children laughing coming from their electronics. They have also heard disembodied voices, such as a person asking “Who’s there?” or the simple question of “Why?” But when drivers respond through their devices, there is nobody on the other end to answer. Some people have even claimed to have heard the sounds of snarling or growling coming from their radios. What’s even more frightening is the fact that there are no cell phone or radio antennas in that area, so the strange sounds coming from electronic devices are a real mystery.

Some people have reported seeing ghost cars, shadow people, and ghostly apparitions of hitchhikers, as well as suddenly driving into thick fog that appears out of nowhere, and even feeling cold spots. Some have also witnessed unexplained balls of light that zig-zag above the road. Others have claimed to have seen the ghostly apparition of a young woman in a flowing white dress or nightgown. An even more disturbing allegation is that some drivers have claimed that an unseen force had taken over control of their vehicles.

While state officials have blamed the exceptionally high amount of car accidents on congested traffic conditions, many people believe that the crashes are caused by restless spirits that are looking for revenge after their graves were disturbed.

There’s no doubt that there have been an unusually high number of car accidents on the I-4, and there are a lot of claims coming from people who have experienced strange and unexplained things in that area. Add in the fact that the Dead Zone is resting on top of four graves, and… well, it’s no surprise that this is the most haunted highway in America.


Highway to Hell –

WIF Myths & Legend

The Graveyard of the Atlantic Ocean – WIF Travel

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Sable Island:

The Graveyard

of the Atlantic

Sable Island is a small island located about 190 miles southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. This remote and very isolated location is one of the farthest offshore islands in Canada. Although it’s almost 200 miles from the mainland, it is still part of the Halifax Region.

The island is famously known for its hundreds of wild horses that inhabit the island, as well as several other animals and birds that make this place so unique. There is, however, a darker history that surrounds the island, specifically the hundreds of shipwrecks that have occurred there over the years. In fact, the island is eerily referred to as the “Graveyard of the Atlantic.”

From the incredible wildlife that inhabits the island, to the French criminals who lived there centuries ago, to the horribly dangerous weather and hundreds of shipwrecks, this article will detail 10 of the most amazing facts about Sable Island.

10. The Location

The distant crescent-shaped sandbar is located almost 200 miles from Halifax in the Atlantic Ocean. Sable Island measures 26 miles long and is home to a considerable amount of wildlife, such as wild horses, seals, and numerous rare birds. In fact, the island is the world’s largest breeding colony for grey seals. The exceptionally strong plant life also attracts many insects that are found no other place on Earth.

The weather is highly unpredictable and the tides are continuously changing. There is much debate on whether Sable Island is, in fact, moving eastward. Some scientists believe that the western part of the island is washing away, while the eastern side of the island is gathering more sand. This makes the island appear as if it’s moving eastward; however, others argue that the island is not moving but it is actually getting smaller and could potentially one day disappear altogether.

9. First Settlers From The 1590s

In the 1590s, a Frenchman with quite a name – Troilus de Mesgouez, marquis de La Roche-Helgomarche, viceroy of New France – decided to harvest colonists for Sable Island to make money from fur and fish. He gathered criminals, vagabonds, and beggars from a French port and told them they would be going to an island where they would work for the colony. By the late 1590s, about 50-60 settlers, along with 10 soldiers, were living on Sable Island. They also had a storehouse.

The criminals, not surprisingly, committed crimes on an almost nightly basis, mostly by robbing each other. When the marquis, who had previously left to explore the mainland, tried returning to the island later that year, he couldn’t find it and ended up sailing back to France. While the settlers received living supplies annually, in 1602 they were cut off and had to fend for themselves. When a new supply ship arrived on the island in 1603, they discovered that only 11 of the settlers were still alive. They had resorted to murdering each other during that year alone on the island. The survivors returned to France, where King Henry IV rewarded them with silver coins. And the island, once again, became uninhabited by humans.

8. It’s Been Named A Canadian National Park

In December 2013, Sable Island was named Canada’s 43rd National Park. The island is home to a variety of animals and plant life. There are over 350 species of birds living on the island, with some listed as endangered. The world’s largest breeding colony of grey seals is found on Sable Island, not to mention the countless number of wild horses living there.

While there are nearly 200 different species of plants found there, there is oddly only one tree on the island – a small pine tree that stands at just three feet tall. The strong winds make it nearly impossible for trees to survive on the island, along with the fact that there isn’t much real soil found there.

There’s also plenty of history and cultural resources connected to the island, such as the many shipwrecks that have happened there. In fact, sometimes when the sand shifts, the remains from shipwrecks are found. Other important locations on the island include the life-saving stations, lighthouses, and telegraph poles.

7. The HMS Delight

In 1583 the HMS Delight, the first recorded shipwreck took place at Sable Island. The Delight was exploring the waters along with another ship named the HMS Squirrel when the commanders of each vessel got into a dispute about the safest course to sail their boats. Richard Clarke, who was the master of the Delight, agreed to obey Sir Humphrey Gilbert’s (the commander of the Squirrel) orders.

The HMS Delight, which was the larger of the two ships and carried the most supplies, ended up wrecking on one of Sable Island’s sandbars and sank. The HMS Squirrel was unable to rescue them as the water was too shallow to enter. The majority of Clarke’s crew members drowned and only 16 of them, along with Clarke himself, were able to get into a small boat and sailed the water for days, hoping for someone to rescue them. They were on the boat for a total of seven days when they finally reached the northern province of Newfoundland. Five days after that, a Basque whaling vessel found the men and rescued them.

6. The Merrimac – Not the Ironclad

The most recent shipwreck on Sable Island – and the first one since 1947 – happened on July 27, 1999, and it was that of the Merrimac. The 12-meter fiberglass yacht with an auxiliary engine was owned by Jean Rheault of Montreal, Quebec. At around 2:00 a.m., after the ship had wrecked, they got into a life raft but quickly realized they were just a few meters away from Sable Island. Once the three-man crew (including Rheault himself) had reached the island, natural gas exploration workers rescued them. The crew members flew to Halifax the following day.

Although Rheault hired a fisherman to try to recover the yacht, they were unable to retrieve it. After just six weeks, the remains of the yacht were nothing more than tiny fragments of fiberglass caused by the sand and strong waves crashing upon the wreckage. A portion of the yacht’s Dacron sail is now on display at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, which is located in Halifax.

5. It’s Home To More Than 350 Species Of Birds

There are over 350 different species of birds living on Sable Island. It’s believed to be the only nesting place in the world for the Ipswich Sparrow. Also found on the island are 2,000 pairs of Herring Gulls, more than 2,500 pairs of terns, and over 500 pairs of Great Black-backed Gulls. Other birds include American Black Ducks, Semi-palmated Plovers, Red-breasted Mergansers, and sandpipers, just to name a few. In addition, there have been several migrant birds, along with exotic strays that have been found there.

There are three types of terns: Roseate, Common, and Arctic. While there are over 2,500 pairs of terns that live on the island, approximately 60% of them are Arctic Terns. The Roseate Terns are listed as an endangered species.

4. Horrible Weather Conditions

Sable Island is known to have extremely strong winds and a lot of fog. In fact, there is a daily average of at least one hour of fog on the island for about a third of the year (125 days). When the warm air from the Gulf Stream mixes in with the cool air from the Labrador Current, it creates fog throughout the island. It also has the strongest winds in the entire province of Nova Scotia. The temperatures, however, are not too severe, with the yearly average ranging between 26 and 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

It’s believed that many of the shipwrecks that have happened on Sable Island were caused by the dangerous and severe weather. Prior to the more advanced modern day navigational equipment, the older instruments depended greatly on using the sun and the stars for navigation, making it impossible for the crew members to use when they reached the thick fog and clouds near the island — a perfect recipe for a shipwreck. In addition to the sometimes horrible weather conditions, Sable Island is also directly in the path of many storms (including hurricanes) that travel up the Atlantic Coast.

3. Human Population: One

We’ve talked about the high wildlife population on this remote island, but there is also one — and only one — person who lives there year-round. In fact, she’s been living there for over 40 years, by herself. Zoe Lucas, who is a 68-year-old scientist, first visited the island in 1971 when she was just 21 years of age and studying goldsmithing. While there are other workers and scientists who rotate shifts on the island, Lucas is the only permanent resident.

While it would seem that living on an island all alone would be terribly boring, Lucas claims that she’s never lonely and spends her time studying the ecology. She lives in a wooden house that’s settled within the sand dunes, and she has supplies flown in every two weeks. She’s found many strange things that have washed ashore, but the oddest one was a fake leg. While many of us couldn’t imagine living in solitude on a remote island, it’s obvious that Lucas really enjoys it, or else she wouldn’t have stayed there for over four decades.

2. It’s Nicknamed the “Graveyard Of The Atlantic”

With severe weather hiding the island from sight because of dangerous storms, large waves, and thick fog, it’s not surprising that many ships have crashed there. Since 1583, more than 350 shipwrecks have been recorded on Sable Island, which is why it has been given the ominous nickname of the Graveyard of the Atlantic.

One of the reasons so many ships have wrecked in that area is that it’s a very rich fishing ground, as well as being directly on the shipping path between North America and Europe, so a lot of boats pass by there every year.

In 1801, the first lifesaving station was developed on the island and by 1895 there were a total of five stations. This project was referred to as the “Humane Establishment.” There were two lighthouses on the island, where someone would always keep watch during the nights. There were also shelters in place where survivors from shipwrecks could go to keep warm and eat. However, after 11 years without any reports of shipwrecks, the Humane Establishment ended in 1958.

1. Wild Horses

When most people think of Sable Island, their first thought is usually of the many wild horses that inhabit the island. While there isn’t an exact count of the number of horses living on the island, it’s believed that there could be up to 400.

While some people assume that the horses ended up on the island by swimming there from one of the shipwrecks, historians believe that they were put on the island on purpose in the 18th century. In the 1750s or 1760s, a Boston merchant and ship-owner named Thomas Hancock transported Acadians to American colonies during their expulsion from Nova Scotia. He also brought horses, cows, hogs, goats, and sheep with him. In the end, it was only the horses that were able to survive on the island, and it’s believed that the horses today are the descendants from those introduced there centuries ago.

And when you consider the horses live on the remote island and have never had any veterinary care or antibiotics, it’s amazing that these animals have survived for centuries on their own.


The Graveyard of the Atlantic Ocean –

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WIF Travel

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 119

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 119

…Constance Caraway has discovered (or (k)new in the past and conveniently forgotten)… is the wonder of companionship, of the conventional sort…

Constance Caraway has acquiesced on the subject of a trip to wherever, committing to that footloose & feckless flyboy friend. But they do have four days until they have to hop that freighter back to Tangier and she may never have the opportunity to see the beautiful Italian landscape again.

She probably won’t tell Fanny about this (again) — work, work, always work. Wait – does she even know that she went to Italy?

From Tuscany to Calabria, north and south, they cruise winding coastal roads in a two-seat ride called an Alpha Romeo 6C Touring Roadster. The left side passenger may have to do some work on the man’s theology, but Ace Bannion definitely has the ‘lives life to the fullest’ thing down pat, replete with  his perpetual style; pannachio as they say in Italian.

The sheer geography alone can take ones’ breath away, hills with awe-inspiring vistas and the corresponding valleys; they cradle a tangled weave of grapevine and lattice.

However, the freshest revelation that Constance Caraway has discovered (or knew in the past and conveniently forgotten)… is the wonder of companionship, of the conventional sort. With Ace at her side, she can experience life without having to worry about what people may be saying behind her back, other than ‘that’s amore’.

When she and Fanny are out and about, they must constantly monitor their level of expressed affection. Obvious or implied, they are damned if they do or deprived if they don’t. There is no winning when gossip replaces reality, ‘what about those two women living together’. The facts, albeit privileged detail, get twisted into some version of perverse hearsay in the 1950s Florida conservative climate.

It is Fanny’s true feelings and aspirations, on the subject of their relational status, which looms over the damp cool air of the Mediterranean as they venture deep into wine country.

mediterranean-sea (1)But that whole issue is in the rear view mirror of the moment, taillights mounted on a speeding sports car, a world away. With every sharp turn, Ace can lose sight of his mortality and Connie can pretend that sexuality is ambiguous.

When they return from Europe and North Africa, there will be just as many irksome questions as those resolutely answered.

They will be landing in the United States clouded with mixed reviews.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 104 (end Ch. 10)

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 118

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 118

…Our life on this planet is not just about what are you going to do the next moment, day or week…

 “You seem to be convinced about that devil fellow,” wonders a curious Ace.

Agent Daniels responds, “I have personally witnessed one miracle and one manifestation in the past few weeks and add that to my involvement with World Agnostica and I can tell you that, with all certainty, that there is a full-fledged spiritual battle going on.”

“Are you still going to ride the fence about God, Ace?” Connie qualifies. It was one of those “stumbling blocks” to any relationship between the two of them; he is a real nice guy but…

“I didn’t know it was that important to you.”

“Choose a side and don’t be a wimp.”

AcePic3“She has a valid point, Mr. Ace,” comments James/Daniels/Spencer/Rogue/Cephus. “Our life on this planet is not just about what are you going to do the next moment, day or week; it is what are you going to do about your eternal soul?”

Ace Bannion is hard to nail down, whether it is getting him to stand still or any of those issues that are best left to the philosophical types.

“Well, we have some four days before the cargo steamer comes back to Rome, I think we are should take in some of the countryside,” Ace makes an executive decision about the present and tables that everlasting thing.

“And I thought we could head back to the states right away, you know, keep the devil on the run.” The lady doth protest too much.

“We can’t just hang around Italy and do nothing and since the roads have been rebuilt since the war, I can hear the hills and valleys calling us.”

Agent Daniels-001

“Wish I could join you guys, but I have to wait for my boss’ next move,” Daniels laments.

Libby Affair-001

“Which one?” she asks.

“All of them,” he replies.

“I know you will be in touch because ‘you have your ways’.”

“I do,” he chuckles, “and I will. The Libby Affair is far from over.”


Constance Caraway P.I.

Fence

Forever Mastadon


page 103

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 115

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 115

…After a good night’s rest, the pair, dressed like any other tourists, stroll down the historic thoroughfares…

Docking an oceangoing freighter is a landing of a divertive sort. Though the seas are rough, the fully loaded cargo vessel cuts its way through chop without much bother. And though it is a ways in from the Tyrrhenian Sea, the City of Seven Hills’ territory extends to the shore, with arterial aquatic access on the Tiber River. Not a commercial seaport, Rome serves as a touch ‘n go stop for tagalongs like Caraway and Bannion and their lumbering transport ship.

Much like any other international destination, Ace knows where to go and who can get him there, “Don’t lose track of me CC.”

“Not a chance Ace, I may just feed off your leftovers.”

“No chum here for you chum. There is not a pretty girl in every port-o-call like you may have speculated.”

She does not lead on like she was paying much attention, but she is, “Let’s find a place to stay for the night, we can hit it hard tomorrow….”

“Yes, hit it hard!”

“In separate rooms…….”

“Same room, I’ll take the sofa.”

“That’ll work,” she concedes, “then we can go over our strategy.”

After a good night’s rest, the pair, dressed like any other tourists, stroll down the historic thoroughfares, set out to case the building at Tre Sei (666) Via Catone. Constance always has a camera in her handbag, and sometimes it even has film in it, but not this time; it makes a neat click sound either way. Ace is Ace, checking his tour guide, which is a nondescript piece of paper from out of his wallet, serving as a map.

“Creepy building CC… has to be from the days of the Roman Empire.”

“Look up… try not to be obvious man… at the top floor windows.”

“Let’s see, they are pitch-black and have beads of water on Worn stairsthe outside of them. I believe that means it’s much colder inside than out, right?”

“But a building this old does not have a heating or cooling system. It may be winter in this hemisphere, but it is still 60 degrees or so, so how do account for the condensation,” she lays out the facts? “You can’t, can you?”

“Can’t say that I can,” he looks up, down and around and inside the portico. “The granite on the stairs is well worn. I see a set of footprints, one up, one down, same shoes.”

“I see two up, one of them older and then one down.”

“That would mean someone is inside.”


 Constance Caraway P.I.


page 100

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 114

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 114

…Ace Bannion knows a little about everything and very much about certain things…

With the help of prevailing winds at 20,000 feet, they reach the French Protectorate of Morocco, landing at Tangier-Boukhalef in less than the expected 14 hours. The United States military uses this airport because of its strategic Mediterranean perch, not its reputation as a haven for spies and other questionables.

They bid the Globemaster crew a transitory farewell, but only for a week if things go well, two if they don’t and never if Pentateuch has his way.

Enough fences have been mended with the Brookley A.F.B. General to secure a return trip; his step-daughter has since become engaged to some Army officer and that P-51 Mustang joy ride has been swept under the carpet, in the guise of testing out a newly rebuilt engine.

As a world traveler, Constance’s companion is without peer. He seems to have been everywhere and knows someone in those places who will help him with whatever he needs. And she has suspected that there are girls awaiting his return, forever and a day, but she has been over any misplaced jealousy for just about as long.

Out of the blue, Constance asks, “How much do you know about explosives?”

Ace Bannion knows a little about everything and very much about certain things, “Enough to be dangerous, why?”

“When we get to Rome, I have a little project for you.”

“Well, if you want to blow something up, we’ll have to buy it now, before we board the boat,” they are sailing to Rome on the SS Zeligja a cargo steamer with Casablanca registry. “If we are going to use PE-4 plastics, we’ll have to get from the black market here in Tangier.”

She describes what she has in mind, a big enough bomb to take down a four story building at TreSei Via Catone. “What kind of address is that tre sei, three-six.”

“Think about it Einstein.”

“3 sixes… holy jumpin’ jehosaphat!” Ace imprecates.

“See what I mean? Agent Daniels gave me that address, and I told him not to be there this week.” During the 12 hour flight across the Atlantic she has had ample time to provide Ace with all the facts of the Libby Affair. “I could not help but think about that building in Chicago—the one without the 39th floor I told you about. I would bet my last $1000 chip at a blackjack table that that very building is the U.S. headquarters and this Vatican address is the worldwide hub for all this trouble.”


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 100

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 111

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 111

…“That gives us the weekend to bum around this Toddlin’ Town…

“That gives us the weekend to bum around this Toddlin’ Town.”

“Yes, I want to meet all the players in this game. This ain’t your ordinary cheating husband crap,” Ace speculates. Constance Knows.

In the time it takes to drive down Lake Shore Drive south, give or take 10 minutes, she has time to unravel the twisted tale of a missing scientist, two nosey broads from Florida, a relentless storytelling taxi driver and Satan.

“The University of Chicago is an amazing place. It is as diverse a college campus as you’ll find; nothing like the lily-white schools in the south. Willard Libby is a researcher slash professor here and the only reason we came up to the great white north,” when she and Fanny landed in Illinois their lives began to change. “He is an amazing story, was catatonic when we found him, but when you meet him, you wouldn’t know it.”

Libby Dead or Alive-001“So you have him stashed away somewhere?”

“Yeah, they had a funeral for him last week… yes I know it’s bizarre, but the man wouldn’t last a day on the street. Every brother and his mother have been trying to keep his mouth shut, permanent-like.”

“All this because he was shaving a few years off the age of Earth?”

“More than a just a few years and it turns out there is an unbelievable conspiracy to shut him up.”

“Ah ha,” he can appreciate a good put-on, “the bad guys think they have done just that?”

“Isn’t that beautiful?” she gloats. “But the hits just keep on coming—good, smart people are still at risk and there is no letting our guard down.” Ace can tell how serious she really is. “And good folks, like Eddie Dombroski’s family and our neighbor Betty are being kidnapped, Battles_grandeshot or bombed. This needs to stop.”

“Good, let’s stop the bastards, I’m in favor of that, but the last time I checked God could have stopped the devil, before he got going, but he didn’t and WE, little ol’ us is going to do it?”

“According to our Agent Daniels, the double agent’s double agent, a genuine real in-your-face act of God took care of one bad guy. That only ties the score in my book and I want to be on the winning side.” She cups his chin with her freehand, “Sometimes you pick the fight, other times the fight picks you.”


Constance Caraway P.I.

Pick Your Battles

Forever Mastadon


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