2015 Zodiac – If You so Believe

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2015 Predictions for

Each Zodiac Sign

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Many people love reading their astrological horoscopes. 

It is estimated that between 20-30% of women do so regularly. 

This is especially popular at the beginning of each new year as people want to know what the upcoming year has in store for them.  It sometimes seems though that all horoscopes could apply and this is because they are kept generic to cover a large portion of the population, 1/12 so to say.  Furthermore, if you have ever had your astrological chart done, you will know that you are comprised of more than just your primary sun sign.  Great influences are also the 12 houses and especially the ascendant or rising sign.

The horoscopes in this article were not done with the help of astrology but rather with the help of theMadame Lenormand fortune telling cards.  The author, Beth Michaels, has some experience with cartomancy and sometimes shares this with her readers.

Now please keep in mind.  This is meant for fun.  It is truly for entertainment purposes only.  Every individual adult human is still responsible for the decisions they make in life.

 

1) Aries

March 21 - April 20

This will be a good year in terms of security for you.  You have friends you can rely on!  You can talk freely and openly with them.  Your issues are safe with them.

2) Taurus

April 21 - May 21

This year is about loyalty.  Only invest your well-being (both physical and financial) in people and institutions you are familiar with and trust to be looking out for your best interests.

3) Gemini

May 22 - June 21

This year a woman you know will teach you something important about your health and help you make good lifestyle choices.

4) Cancer

June 22 - July 22

Clarity on the home front.  Issues and misunderstandings with close loved ones will finally be resolved.

5) Leo

July 23 - Aug. 22

Existing and known difficulties and hardships involving a woman, perhaps a mother figure or older woman, will unfortunately remain this year as well.

6) Virgo

Aug. 23 - Sept. 23

Many sudden and expected hindernesses cross your path this year.  The ensuing frustration might lead to arguments and fights.

7) Libra

Sept. 24 - Oct. 22

An important year for long-term commitments, especially financial contracts.  Many women in serious relationships can look forward to engagement rings :-)

8) Scorpio

Oct. 23 - Nov. 22

This year you will have options.  You will come to a crossroads and have to make a choice which path you take.  Whatever decision you make, stay true to the loved ones who are dependent on you.

9) Sagittarius

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21

This year you will receive an letter or notice from a financial or public institution, agency or school regarding money or property.

10) Capricorn

Dec. 22 - Jan. 19

A lucky year for you in terms of new beginnings!  If you are married or in a committed relationship, you might expect a pregnancy or the birth of offspring.  If you own a business, this could mean growth, expansion or “add ons.”

11) Aquarius

Jan. 20 - Feb. 18

A great year for sexuality, wonderful evenings together and closeness on a spiritual level.  You will feel like your sexual needs are finally being understood.

12) Pisces 

Feb. 19 - March 20

This year will offer many opportunities to attend public functions, meetings, celebrations and parties.  Be ready to receive lots of invitations!  Ladies, flowers are coming your way :-)

2015 Zodiac – If You so Believe

Electioneering, Arm Twisting & Influence Peddling

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Electioneering, Arm Twisting & Influence Peddling

Abraham Lincoln

“Elections belong to the people. It’s their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters.”
Abraham Lincoln
Franklin D. Roosevelt

“Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education.”
Franklin D. Roosevelt
Henry David Thoreau

“All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or back gammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it. The character of the voters is not staked. I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail. I am willing to leave it to the majority. Its obli­gation, therefore, never exceeds that of expediency. Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority.”
Henry David Thoreau, On the Duty of Civil Disobedience
Jesse Ventura

“Remember something, if you will, about voting: Voting is not a horse race, you’re not going there thinking “Gee, I gotta pick the winner so I can brag to my friends ‘Oh, I picked so-and-so and he or she won'”. Voting is voting your heart and voting your conscience and when you’ve done that, don’t ever, EVER let a Democrat or Republican tell you that you’ve wasted your vote because the fact is, if you DON’T vote your heart and conscience then you HAVE wasted your vote.”
Jesse Ventura
Lyndon B. Johnson

“A man without a vote is a man without protection.”
Lyndon B. Johnson
Grover Cleveland

“Sensible and responsible women do not want to vote. The relative positions to be assumed by man and woman in the working out of our civilization were assigned long ago by a higher intelligence than ours.”
Grover Cleveland

“Voting is like Tumbling Dice.” Gwenny

Electioneering, Arm Twisting & Influence Peddling

Memoirs – Passing on Life Lessons for Posterity

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Top Ten 8

 

At Home With Home Quotes

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Quotable Quotes 001

Laura Ingalls Wilder

“Home is the nicest word there is.”
Laura Ingalls Wilder

James Baldwin

“Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition.”
James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room
L. Frank Baum

“If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t look any further than my own back yard. Because if it isn’t there, I never really lost it to begin with.”
L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Ralph Waldo Emerson

“The ornament of a house is the friends who frequent it.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson
George Moore

“A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it.”
George Moore, The Brook Kerith
Mark Twain

“A home without a cat — and a well-fed, well-petted and properly revered cat — may be a perfect home, perhaps, but how can it prove title?”
Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson

At Home With Home Quotes

Philosophical Differences – In America (of all places)

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Top Ten6

10 Great American Philosophers

 

When one thinks of great philosophers (which probably isn’t too often), one most likely thinks of dead Europeans. Almost all writers studied in a philosophy class will be European, and in some classes there will be absolutely no mention of American philosophers at all. There are good reasons for this —

America really hasn’t existed for all that long, and there perhaps hasn’t been as much general emphasis on philosophy as in some other countries like the big three of France, Germany and Great Britain. But in its relatively short life span America has produced some great thinkers, including…

10. John Dewey

Portrait of John Dewey

John Dewey was a leading scholar in the American philosophical school of pragmatism. This isn’t the same pragmatism spoken of by politicians, but is instead a rejection of the notion that thought is meant mainly to describe or mirror reality. It could be described as a realist point of view — essentially, it claims that most philosophical topics should be viewed in terms of their usefulness, as opposed to purely on their representative accuracy.

Although he made contributions to philosophy and psychology, perhaps Dewey’s greatest impact was as an educational reformer. In Dewey’s view, it’s vital that classroom activities focus on meaningful activity in place of rote learning. Students should be invested in what they are learning and the curriculum should seem relevant to their lives. He viewed learning by doing to be an important factor missing from American education. In the early days of American education there was a great focus on memorization, such as remembering all the state capitals. But the influence of Dewey and others started to move education towards focusing on teaching children how to think critically.

9. John Rawls

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John Rawls was one of the most important political thinkers of the 20th century. After serving in the Pacific during World War Two, he came back and got a PhD in moral philosophy from Princeton, and would go on to teach there and atCornell, MIT and Harvard. Rawls is best known for his defense of egalitarian liberalism in his work A Theory of Justice.

In the book, he attempts to find common ground between the two seemingly conflicting concepts of liberty and equality. Rawls ultimately concludes that it’s important that we define justice as fairness. He states that “each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive basic liberty,” meaning freedom of thought, freedom of expression, etc. In Rawls’ view, we have certain basic rights that should not be infringed upon. He also claims that we should have a “fair equality of opportunity.” This means society and government should be set up to give equal opportunities to each person, as best as can be done. Because of these two requirements, Rawls views both strict communism and laissez-faire capitalism as unjust. And so, we as a society must strive for a middle ground, trying our best to find a balance between liberty and equality.

8. Jonathan Edwards

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Jonathan Edwards was one of the greatest influences on American protestant theology. Born in Connecticut in 1703, Edwards was one of the leaders of the Puritan movement, which seeked to distance Protestantism from Catholicism. Puritans believed that the Bible itself should be the final word on what we should do, and disliked the Catholic traditions that didn’t come from the Bible directly.

Because of this focus on the Bible, education and literacy was emphasized. Edwards himself attended Yale University at age 13, and would go on to write extensively on religious topics ranging from metaphysics to ethics. Perhaps Edwards’ most influential idea was his defense of theological determinism, within which he stated that God is the ultimate and final cause of everything that happens. This has had both positive and negative effects — if people believe God is the ultimate cause, then they will believe it vital to do what God has ordained. This could vary from something as noble as feeding poor children to something as stupid as “witch” burning. So, for both good and ill, Edwards had a huge impact on American religion and, by extension,  society.

7. Cornel West

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Cornel West is one of the most publicly known philosophers today, and perhaps the most well known African American philosopher. While West has taught at Harvard, Princeton and Yale, he is also a very active social commentator and political activist. His writings tend to deal with relevant real world issues — in his books, he has analyzed wide ranging social problems having to do with race, class and justice.

Many of his main beliefs stem from his Christian background, which he mixes with his belief in democratic socialism, a somewhat rare combination. Growing up he was influenced largely by the church his family attended, but also by the Black Panther Party and the writings of Karl Marx. West has sometimes come into conflict with administrators because of his activism, which eventually led to his resignation at Harvard. His most famous and influential book was Race Matters, a series of essays that came out soon after the Rodney King beating. In it, he discussed the problem of African American poverty, and argued against recommendations from black leaders that he felt were unlikely to solve the problem.

6. Michael Sandel

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Michael Sandel, a professor of government at Harvard, is most likely the most popular living political philosopher. He is very well known for his lectures and books, even outside academia. His class on justice at Harvard routinely has more than 1000 students, and he has taken an adapted lecture version on the road, speaking in America, India and countries in East Asia. The entire course can also be viewed on Harvard’s website for free.

Sandel believes that in order for us to be good citizens we must first grapple with hard ethical choices. In his lectures he acts somewhat like Socrates did, asking questions of his audience and expecting answers. In this way, he engages the audience and encourages them to question why they believe what they believe. Sandel thinks this is especially important considering the modern emphasis on being neutral. He argues that we can’t really be neutral, and will always make value judgments of some kind. Because of this, it’s vital that we confront our beliefs and engage in deep reflection over what it means to be good.

5. Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Ralph Waldo Emerson was the leading figure of American Transcendentalism, and had a great influence on later thinkers. Transcendentalism was largely a reaction against rationalism and Calvinism. In his book Nature, Emerson argues that nature acts as an intermediary between man and the divine. Emerson thought that it’s possible to legitimately have beliefs that are not falsifiable. He believed we should look within ourselves to gain “transcendental” knowledge, or intuitive belief we derive from our inner mentality.

Because of this, Emerson was a great believer in the supremacy of the individual over the group, a viewpoint rarely held throughout history. Transcendentalists like Emerson believed that groups corrupt the individual, and thus it’s crucial to decide for ourselves what’s important. This focus on the individual would greatly influence the thought of American intellectuals and the public.

4. Charles Sanders Peirce

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Charles Sanders Peirce was a mathematician, chemist, and geodist (a mixture of applied math and earth science), but he considered scientific philosophy, particularly the study of logic, to be his calling. He had an extraordinary range of interests, writing on subjects as different as astronomy and economics. In his most well known writings, he argued that the scientific method was the superior method for determining truth. Pierce is known as the founder of pragmatism, but he disliked the way others used the term. In fact, he was so concerned about misuse he relabeled his own method as pragmaticism, to distinguish it from pragmatism’s new meanings.

He also argued against determinism, the idea that all events are ultimately decided outside of will. He believed that the universe displays degrees of habit, but even with the same input there is variation. Because of his greatly varied contributions, Pierce is something different to different people. A psychologist, a logician, a physical scientist and a philosopher will all have something to learn by studying different aspects of his writing.

3. Thomas Jefferson

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Thomas Jefferson is of course best known for being one of the founding fathers of the United States. He wrote much of the Declaration of Independence and served as the third President. He was a politician, but his political actions and beliefs were greatly influenced by his basic philosophical beliefs. In fact, Jefferson was a member and, for a time, the president of the American Philosophical Association.

Much of his writing described abstract principles as opposed to concrete political doctrines. Jefferson was a defender of democracy, and he argued for a will of the people. But he also realized that the majority could abuse those not in agreement with them, and so he was one of the first defenders of civil rights in America. Unfortunately, his belief that “all men are created equal” didn’t extend to non-white men, as he was a slave owner all his life. Despite this hypocrisy, his philosophical arguments for freedom put forth in the Declaration were eventually used by others in various human rights movements that extended civil rights farther than they had ever been. Because of his wide ranging influence, Jefferson is certainly one of the most important political philosophers in American history.

2. Henry David Thoreau

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Henry David Thoreau held many occupations during his life — teacher, lecturer, surveyor, naturalist, head of a pencil company (seriously, his family sold pencils) — but he always thought of himself as a writer. He probably began writing poetry while in school at Harvard, but his most influential writings would be his philosophical essays and nonfiction. He is often grouped with Transcendentalism, a religious movement that promoted individualism and believed in the inherent goodness of people.

The subject of individualism is perhaps where Thoreau did his greatest writing. In an essay on civil disobedience, Thoreau argued that individuals have an obligation to determine what is right and what is wrong for themselves — just because society says something is correct doesn’t make it so. This applies both to laws and unwritten mainstream beliefs. He believed it critically important for individuals to think for themselves. Part of what differentiated Thoreau from many other philosophers is that he didn’t prescribe one form of the good life; he believed that each person had to figure it out for themselves. He told people not to emulate him, but to search inside themselves to discover what was important to them. This made him a unique modern philosopher, and one of the most important influences on American thought.

1. William James

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William James made important early contributions to both psychology and physiology. Those two fields were where he focused much of his life, but he always threw in some philosophical analysis and would turn increasingly towards philosophy as he aged. His 1,200 page book The Principles of Psychologylaid much of the groundwork for modern psychology, and greatly influenced both Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. But it included not only pure psychology, but also philosophy and personal reflection that influenced many important later philosophers, including Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein.

James also wrote much about religion from a relativist position, discussing the commonalities of all religions and whether or not religion and science can coexist. He argued against extremism on both sides, coming to conclusions on his own as opposed to always agreeing with one side or the other. Because of the great diversity of subjects that he wrote about, and the ways he mixed them together, William James was one of the most influential thinkers in American history.

Philosophical Differences – In America (of all places)

But what about>>>>

Secret Quotes

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quotes

Benjamin Franklin

“Three may keep a secret, if two of them are dead.”

George Orwell
“If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.” 
Sara Shepard
“The best secrets are the most twisted” 
James Joyce
“Secrets, silent, stony sit in the dark palaces of both our hearts: secrets weary of their tyranny: tyrants willing to be dethroned.” 

― James Joyce

 

Secret Quotes

Un-Fortune

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Quotable Quotes 001

Un-Fortune

William Faulkner

“A man is the sum of his misfortunes. One day you’d think misfortune would get tired but then time is your misfortune”

Washington Irving

“Great minds have purpose, others have wishes. Little minds are tamed and subdued by misfortunes; but great minds rise above them.”

― Washington Irving

Solon
“If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap, whence every one must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart.”
― Solon

Un-Fortune