Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #219

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #219

…George Eastman, the inventor of the Kodak camera, a captain of  industry, reduces himself to nursemaid, helping his brother-in-law cling to life…

captains of industry

 “That damned flu hit him from out of nowhere. I found him in bed, after the magazine called me wondering if I had seen him,”  George Eastman recalls the events.

  “And I was across the country, oh what kind of wife can I be!?” She is distraught. “Why didn’t he let us know he was coming home? I would not have gone away in the first place.”

 “He is upstairs. The hospitals are full. Here, put this on, we don’t need anyone else sick.” He hands her a mask.

 “Is it that bad? I mean if the hospitals are full, that would be thousands.”

“Didn’t you read the papers in California?” George asks like she came from another planet.

“No, had no time, just heard talk of us winning some big battles in Europe.”

11,000 are dead in Philadelphia alone.”

 She hangs her head. “That is why the streets are deserted isn’t it?”

“People are afraid to talk to anybody. And poor Harv, he was shaken badly when he came home, only ten men survived on the Navy ship he crossed the ocean in. He was putting together a story when it got him.”

“Oh, my God – I want to see him,” she rushes to his side.

“You may not recognize him, lost a lot of weight, and he sleeps all day, it’s all I can do to get him to take in fluids, but I think he’s getting a little better.” George Eastman, the inventor of the Kodak camera, a captain of the photographic industry, reduces himself to nursemaid, helping his brother-in-law cling to life. “The good news is that he has made it past the first day. Most people who die go fast, mostly younger too.”

“He’s got a strong heart… oh, Harv I am so sorry I wasn’t here for you, can you ever forgive me?” She kneels beside their bed, sobbing, not expecting an answer.

“Do you think I would die without being able to ask my partner why she abandoned our magazine, to be a movie star no less?” Harv Pearson’s speech is slow, but lucid.

“I can’t hug you, you rascal, but when I can, look out.” She looks back at George, mouthing a hearty, ‘thank you’.

MeanwhileThe Spanish influenza leaves as quickly as it had struck, erasing thirty million lives along the way, in time to allow dancing in the streets when the Armistice is signed and the Great War ends on November 11th.

  The balance of power has shifted… for now.


Alpha Omega M.D.

Colorized photo shows the German delegation, as they arrive to sign the Armistice provisionally ending World War One, in a train dining car outside Compiegne, France. (Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty)

Episode #219


page 204 (end ch. 11)

Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #218

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #218

…Upon leaving Orange County California Judith is faced with one big uphill named the Rocky Mountains; sea level to fifteen thousand feet in a matter of 200 miles…

Rocky Mountain Railroad Excursion by Howard Fogg

The three day return trip is doubly melancholy for Judith Eastman; she leaves something behind and she doesn’t know what to expect when she gets home, having been gone over three weeks. She stares blankly out her window during the day, tosses and turns in her Pullman at night. Reality has indeed settled in.

If she were in a taxicab, she could tell the driver to step on it, but a train has its own plodding pace, 60 mph, downhill, full throttle. And sure as there is a downhill, there is an uphill to match. Upon leaving Orange County California you discover one big uphill named the Rocky Mountains; sea level to fifteen thousand feet in a matter of 200 miles. At the highest elevations, snow has taken over the mountain peaks, very pretty indeed, but two months from now, passage over the mountains is touch and go. Even a thousand horsepower has trouble with four feet of fresh fallen snow.

But once you have passed the Nevada Territory, the leeward deserts and wasteland, the locomotive is faced with a thousand miles of seemingly level terrain. Of course the quality of sight-seeing goes downhill with the land, with nothing but endless waves of windblown prairie grasses. Throw in the occasional bison and a rodent hunting hawk for every acre, you have the American heartland in a nutshell.

Judith just stares past it all, homesick and alone.

Rocky Mountain Steam Train by Max Jacquiard

What she finds at home will not comfort her.

“Harv is very sick,” tells brother, George Eastman, wearing a surgeon’s mask who greets her along with her old dog.

“Hello, Frisky,” she acknowledges her faithful pet. “Sick? Where? Paris?”

“No, he came home four days after you left, seemed fine and sorely happy to be back, even worked at the office for a couple of weeks.” George gathers the courage he will need. “Then that damned flu hit him from out of nowhere. I found him in bed, after the magazine called me wondering if I had seen him.”


Alpha Omega M.D.

Episode #218


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Diving Deep Into Oceans – Sea-ing WIF Mysteries

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Bizarre Mysteries

of the Sea

Oceans cover 70% of Earth’s surface, and if you think what horrors and marvels the rest of the 30% host, it should come as no surprise that the watery parts of our planet have more than their share of strange stuff as well.

What may surprise you, however, is just how unbelievably weird and mysterious the oceans can get. Here are 10 of our favorite creepy secrets of the sea.

10. Something is eating great white sharks

In 2014, scientists discovered that some strange and no doubt terrifying aquatic creature was snacking on great white sharks, which was worrying because great whites are pretty much the apex predator of the oceans. The phenomenon was discovered off the coast of Southwest Australia where a great white wearing a research tag suddenly dove to 1,903 feet, while the tag (which was later discovered on a beach 2.5 miles from the incident) recorded a temperature spike from 46°F to 78°F. The abrupt plunge and the rising temperature strongly suggested that something had attacked the large shark — but what?

Initially, experts thought that the shark may have been eaten by an even bigger shark, which is pretty creepy already. However, an even more terrifying potential reason eventually emerged: The shark may have been the victim of an orca. Apparently, the killer whales occasionally like to attack great whites. There’s even a documented incident of two orcas attacking a great white and eating its liver, possibly with fava beans and a nice chianti. There’s no consensus on just how common these supposedly rare attacks are, but great whites are certainly aware of them. They appear to be so terrified of orcas that when a pod of killer whales visits a great white’s hunting grounds for just a few hours, the sharks may flee in abject terror and avoid the area for up to a year. Yeah, the ocean is so scary that even great white sharks refuse to go to the rougher neighborhoods.

9. The milky sea effect

It’s one thing to encounter terrifying creatures at sea, and completely another when the sea itself starts acting strange. We’re not talking about huge waves or other weather phenomena, either — we’re talking about a phenomenon where a giant part of the ocean suddenly lights up in an eerie glow. It’s called the milky sea effect, and the areas it affects are so vast that you can sometimes even see them from space In 2005, the phenomenon was captured in photos by the Naval Research Laboratory, and that particular instance spanned a whopping 5,780 square miles — roughly the size of Connecticut.

Oh, and here’s the creepy thing: We have absolutely no idea what’s causing the milky sea effect, how its instances form and what’s the source of the illumination. Right now, the best scientists can do is hazard a guess about huge colonies of bioluminescent bacteria.

8. Devil’s Sea

The Bermuda Triangle may be the go-to area when it comes to strange maritime disappearances and legends of all sorts of paranormal shenanigans. However, the Devil’s Sea in Japan’s corner of the Pacific Ocean can certainly put up a fight. Reportedly, many ships have vanished there, including multiple large vessels in the 1950s. In fact, between 1950 and 1954 alone, no less than nine large freighters reportedly disappeared in the area, and none of them managed to send out a distress call. When the Japanese government got fed up with the situation, they sent a ship called Kaiyo-Maru to research the situation. Reportedly, it disappeared too.

Of course, it must be noted that not everyone attributes these disappearances to sea monsters and aliens, or even believes that there are disproportionate amounts of vanished ships at all. According to Skeptoid, the whole thing is a brainchild of paranormal researcher Ivan T. Sanderson, who invented the Devil’s Sea as part of his theory of “vile vortices,” a set of 10 Bermuda Triangle -like areas with otherworldly attributes. This would cast a number of legends around the area in a rather dubious light — although Skeptoid admits that the disappearance of the Kaiyo-Maru seems to be a legitimate event, so who knows?

7. The Yonaguni “monument”

What would you do if you unexpectedly found a sunken ruin from an ancient civilization? Such a thing happened to marine geologist Masaaki Kimura in 1986, at least if you ask Masaaki Kimura. He was diving off the coast of Japan’s Ryukyu islands when he came across a vast, mysterious rock formation that was so angular and complex that it looked a lot like a man-made structure. Kimura set out to research what became known as the Yonaguni monument, and says that it’s clearly man-made. He also says that there are carvings on some of the structures, and that the “monument” is actually a vast complex that features roads, castles, pyramids and even a stadium. This has led him to conclude that the Yonaguni monument is actually the remains of the Atlantis-like Lost Continent of Mu.

Other scientists disagree, and point out that the rock’s formations are actually perfectly normal for large masses of sandstone in tectonically active underwater areas. However, even if the majority of the structure may not have been built by human hands, pottery from 2500 BCE has been found in the area, so there’s a chance that humans lived in the area before it went underwater, and perhaps even altered the rock formations.

6. The Baltic Sea anomaly

In 2011, the Ocean X shipwreck hunting team led by Peter Lindberg captured a strange sonar image at the bottom of the Baltic Sea. The vaguely Millennium Falcon-shaped object in the picture became known as the Baltic Sea Anomaly, and it soon started attracting all sorts of UFO-themed attention.

Unfortunately for the X-Files-minded, the Anomaly wasn’t a submerged portion of Area 51, or a sign of an ancient civilization. While many experts were initially puzzled by its true nature, even Lindberg himself didn’t truly think it was an alien spacecraft (since they could tell it wasn’t metallic). As such, the reason it caused a big stir was not a “Whoa, aliens” situation, but rather interest over the fact that the Anomaly was so difficult to identify. Well, difficult to people who aren’t geologists — after all, they’re quite certain that the Anomaly is merely a glacial deposit.

5. All sorts of unexplained sounds

The ocean can be a noisy place, and every so often, humanity encounters an underwater sound that’s unlike anything we’ve ever heard. Although the famous “Bloop” sound eventually turned out to be a natural phenomenon known as icequake, there are still plenty of aural underwater oddities to entice and creep out the enquiring mind.

The “Upsweep” is an odd, ongoing constellation of shortish, upsweeping sounds that originate from somewhere in Pacific, and seem to get louder during spring and autumn. No one knows what’s going on, but the prevailing theory is that it has something to do with volcanic activity. “Slow down” is a periodical, gradually slowing seven-minute sound that some people attribute to giant squids, and others insist is just the noise of an iceberg running aground. Then there are individual, unexplained noises such as “Julia” and “The Whistle” — and, of course, the most tragic sound of them all, “52 Hertz.”

52 Hertz is not as mysterious as it is sad, as the sound belongs to a lonesome whale that has a peculiar 52-hertz call that’s much higher than other whale calls, and due to this it’s likely that the animal has never found a mate. Scientists have dubbed it “the loneliest whale in the world,” and have tried to track its location for over two decades, presumably to give it a bro hug and tell it that there are other fish in the sea.

4. The submarine disappearances of 1968

Submarines are dangerous things, so it’s no surprise that every so often, there’s an accident. However, what if four submarines from different countries disappeared in mysterious circumstances within months of each other, and there’s not even a World War raging? This exact thing happened between January and May 1968. The first ship to go was the Israeli INS Dakar, which disappeared in January in the Mediterranean Sea, along with its 69-man crew. Two days after that, the French Minerve and its crew of 52 disappeared on the same region on a routine patrol mission under an experienced captain. After that, things took a turn towards the Cold War: The Soviet nuclear sub K-129 and its 98-man crew went permanently down in Pacific in March, and in May, the equally nuclear USS Scorpion went to the bottom of the North Atlantic sea.

While the sinkings (probably) weren’t the work of a frustrated sea monster who wanted the annoying humans from gentrifying the neighborhood, it doesn’t make the stories behind these four disasters any less interesting. INS Dakar’s wreckage was found in 1999, and while it purportedly just dove deeper than its hull could handle, the denials from the Israeli military and a 2005 interview of an Egyptian naval officer who claims to have sunk the Dakar make its final fate pretty good conspiracy theory material. The reason for Minerve’s loss remains a mystery, but its remains were found in 2019 after an extensive operation.

In 1974, the CIA managed to lift parts of the K-129 in the huge, secretive Project Azorian, which nevertheless leaked to the press within a year, giving birth to the phrase “we can neither confirm and deny” as the Agency was flailing to keep things secret as long as they could. USS Scorpion, on the other hand, remains at the bottom of the sea, its nuclear wreckage no doubt carefully monitored by all parties. We still don’t know whether it was destroyed by a hull breach, an explosion within the submarine, or a Soviet torpedo.

3. The sea serpent sighting of HMS Daedalus

In the “here there be dragons” age of maritime travel when monsters were very much considered an occupational hazard of sailing, one of the more interesting sightings of supposed giant sea serpents came from an account by Captain Peter M’Quhae of HMS Daedalus, a British vessel that purportedly encountered such a monster on August 6, 1848. In an official report to the Admiralty, the captain described a huge, serpentine creature with a large head and “at the very least” 60 feet of unseen body that it used to propel itself forward.

To this day, the story remains one of the more enticing accounts of monstrous sea creatures thanks to the general perceived trustworthiness of Royal Navy officers, and their unlikeliness to fabricate such sightings. Still, even at the time, some biologists pointed out that the good captain and his officers had probably just seen an elephant seal and gotten confused.

2. The vanishing island of Bermeja

Off the Yucatan peninsula, there used to be a tiny, uninhabited island called Bermeja. We say “used to,” because at some point, the island disappeared. For centuries, it used to feature on the area’s maps, but by the time the 18th Century rolled in, it slowly started to fade away from cartography, and its last confirmed appearance in a map was in 1921. Mexico has been quite keen to know what happened to their tiny island, and in 2009 alone there were three attempts to locate it with cutting edge technology, all to no avail.

There seems to be two main theories regarding Bermeja’s relatively sudden disappearance. One is that the low-lying island sank because of rising sea levels or an island-sinking natural disaster. The other is that, uh, the CIA blew up the island because the area contained oil and they wanted to improve the U.S. claim on it. However, there’s a third, arguably even stranger possibility: That Bermeja never existed. Early explorers sometimes drew maps with inaccuracies that only they knew about, so their competitors could not rely on them. Bermeja might be such an inaccuracy that at some point went viral among the cartographers, only to eventually fall into obscurity when everyone started making accurate maps. Mexico, however, claims to have information that Bermeja existed, though not in the location the maps show… so it appears the jury is still out on the “phantom island” and its true nature.

1. The immortal jellyfish

What’s the most mysterious creature of the sea? Most people would probably say it’s the giant squid, or one of the many cryptozoological monsters that supposedly roam the oceans. However, a tiny jellyfish known as Turritopsis dohrnii leaves all them in shame, for reasons best described by its nickname: The immortal jellyfish.

The immortal jellyfish is exactly what it says on the tin: It can live forever. T. dohrnii can alternate between polyp and medusa states, and whenever it is injured or comes to the apparent end of its natural life, it just turns its old and damaged cells back to young, virile ones and goes right on. It basically has the healing powers of Wolverine and can reverse-age like Benjamin Button, only at will.

This ability to basically reset itself and start with a full health bar whenever death comes knocking makes Turritopsis dohrnii one of the most incredible instances of marine life, and if science can ever learn to harness its powers… well, let’s just say we’d all save a lot on hospital bills.


Diving Deep Into Oceans –

Sea-ing WIF Mysteries

Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #217

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #217

…“No, I’m afraid I must return to the real world,” tells Judith Eastman…

Variety Pickford-001

 “Bravo! What a scene!” Mary cannot contain herself. “Oh, I wish there were a way to record that scene with every little sound, all that raw emotion.”

The movie’s director is almost in tears, of the joyful variety. He has witnessed Judith’s steady improvement, the way she has started to use body language and that face; able to express a full compliment of moods.

Her final scene even impresses the not easily impressible Harry Langdon.  His last words to her, “I will work with you any time”, are different from his first, “I will not work with an untrained, unknown East Coast frump.” He lied about the frump part, eating those words faster than he can chew.

“Thank you all. I really enjoyed the experience and I am going to miss you. My magazine work will surely now seem boring.”

“You are going to stay until we are done shooting aren’t you?” Mary half asks half urges.

“No, I’m afraid I must return to the real world. I am surprised I was able to concentrate with my husband on the other side of the world.”

“My people will arrange for your return train, and I’ll instruct payroll to cut you a check for your performance.” Businesswoman Pickford takes control. “And please promise me that if I have a role tailor-made for you, that you will answer my call.”

“I cannot promise you absolutely, but I will do almost anything for a friend.”

The pair embraces warmly, but briefly. “Scene 84 to set 5 please, places everyone,” barks the director.

“That’s me, Judith. Have a safe trip and give your husband my best. He is a lucky man.”


Alpha Omega M.D.

Episode #217


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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #216

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #216

Movie Clapboard-001

One Room Schoolhouse by Norman Rockwell

“That is almost more than I can bear!” exclaims Miss Maxwell, sitting down on a bench and stabbing the grass with the tip of her closed parasol. “It seems to me Rebecca never has any respite. I had so many plans for her this next month, in fitting her for her position, and now she will settle down to housework again, and to nursing of that poor, sick, cross old aunt.”

 “If it had not been for the cross old aunt, Rebecca would still have been at Sunnybrook; and from the standpoint of education advantages, or indeed advantages of any sort, she might well have been in the backwoods,” returns Adam.

  “That is true; I was vexed when I spoke, for I thought an easier and happier day was dawning for my prodigy and pearl.”

  “Our prodigy and pearl,” corrects Adam.

  “Oh, yes!” she laughed. “I always forget that it pleases you to pretend you discovered Rebecca.”

  “I believe though those happier days are dawning for her,” continues Adam. “It must be a secret for the present, but Mr. Randall’s farm will be bought by the railroad. We must have right of way through the land, and the station will be built on her property. She will receive six thousand dollars, which, though not a fortune, will yield her three or four hundred dollars a year.

 “There is a mortgage on the land; that paid, and Rebecca self-supporting, the mother ought to push the education of the oldest boy, who is a fine, ambitious fellow. He should be taken away from farm work and settled at his studies.”

 “We might form ourselves into a Randall Protection Agency… Limited,” muses Miss Maxwell. I confess I want Rebecca to have a career.”

 “I don’t,” Adam says promptly.

 “Of course you don’t. Men have no interest in the careers of women! But I know Rebecca better than you.”

 “You understand her mind better, but not necessarily her heart. You are considering her for the moment as prodigy; I am thinking of her more as pearl.”

“Well,” sighs Emily Maxwell whimsically, “prodigy or pearl, the Randall Protective Agency may pull Rebecca in opposite directions, but nevertheless she will follow her saint.”

“That will be fine by me,” says Adam apprehensively.

“Particularly if the “saint” beckons your way.”

 Judith/Miss Maxwell concludes the scene with a provoking smile.

Image result for standing ovation gif

  “Bravo! What a scene!” Mary cannot contain herself.


Alpha Omega M.D.

Scene board-001

Episode #216


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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #215

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #215

…California is so different from New York on the 7th of October when fall is firmly entrenched in the East…

Silent Movie Subtitle-001

As the convoy containing her husband limps into New York, Judith Eastman has already shot four scenes in four days. By all accounts, she is doing a credible, if not inspired job. The majority of her scenes are with Mary/Rebecca, providing for a comfort zone, for a stranger in a strange land.

Silent Movie Subtitle-001  California is so different from New York. It is the 7th of October; fall is firmly entrenched in the East, when a sixty degree day is a treat. In Los Angeles people wear heavy jackets when it’s sixty degrees. Back in Rochester, you are considered flaky if you don’t dress like a normal person and have a full-time job; there are Californians who don’t wear shoes, do wear tropical shirts and do nothing but surf the waves of the Pacific Ocean all day.

The remainder of Judith’s scenes is shot with Harry Langdon, someone she considers a boorish lout, who gives her no help whatsoever and seems to take great pleasure in embarrassing her. But his spiteful actions come to a screeching halt, when Mary catches him in the act, calling Judith names behind her back. From then on, Harry sticks to playing the role of Mr. Adam Ladd.

     Judith will never find out that it was Mary who was the cause of a sudden change in the way he treated her. Mary Pickford has great clout in the industry, even rumored to be setting up a consortium of actors and actresses and directors, including D.W. Griffith, matinee idol Douglas Fairbanks and Charley Chaplin. You do not want to mess with little Miss Mary.

Pickford now pauses to watch the following pivotal scene. She hears what the movie going audience will read on the bottom of the screen.

Silent Movie Subtitle-001


Alpha Omega M.D.

Film Reel #9 by The Artwork Factory

Episode #215


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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #214

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #214

…There were as nearly as many burials at sea than had they been sunk…

Deaths ships-001

‘Masters of the Seas’ by William Lionel Wyllie (Text added)

Judith Eastman and Mary Pickford do not put 10 miles behind them on the way to California, when a telegram arrives at the Pearson-Eastman residence. No one is home. It goes undelivered. Had she been there, as Harv had assumed, the piece of yellow paper would have read:

My Project 17-001

MY DEAREST JUDITH  stop  HAVE LEFT PARIS  stop SHOULD ARRIVE NEW YORK 10/7  stop  CANNOT WAIT TO HOLD YOU  stop  LOVE HARV  end

He will regret not sending the telegram from Paris.

In spite of the coming missed communications, so begins an, albeit, short career as a naval officer aboard the destroyer U.S.S. Chesapeake Bay at the age of 63. Those eight days were gratefully uneventful, at least below the waterline.

Above it, it was another story. There were as nearly as many burials at sea than had they been sunk, or so it seemed. The deck by deck segregation worked for a couple of days, but the devil’s disease finally took hold of the Chesapeake, racing from one sailor to the next. The pattern of taking those in their prime, 20 to 30 years old holds true, men who are or would have been husbands and fathers.

Had they had to go to battle stations, a number of stations would have gone unmanned, such was the carnage. They were a floating sitting duck.

  Word from the other ships in the convoy varies. They seem to be the worse-off naval vessel–it could not get much worse. While the troop-transports hold their own, they are ticking time bombs, likely infectious to anyone who comes in contact with them in the States.

The Chesapeake medical officer finally had the good sense to issue every last surgical mask to those who remain, realizing that one does not have to touch a carrier individual, that it is a dreaded airborne virus; the best possible method of transmission.


Alpha Omega M.D.

Episode #214


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