Spy vs Spy vs Spy – WIF Did You Know?

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Powerful

Intelligence Agencies

Around the World

The human desire to stir things up and uncover secrets is so innate and part of our DNA that of course mankind decided to create entire organizations with that single purpose. Truth be told, it’s a good thing they exist; these agencies have derailed countless plots to do their home countries harm. But we’re also fascinated by the more sinister, clandestine activities they conduct. Here’s a history of spy outfits from around the globe… 

10. Mossad (Israel)

Formed just after the dust settled from World War II, Israel’s foreign intelligence gathering organization was initially called the Institute for Coordination. Things did not get off to a great start for the intelligence agency: it took a year just to get organized enough to be functional, and immediately after that, bungled operations led to several of its officers being arrested. It was when Isser Harel took over Mossad in 1952 that it really found its footing. In 1960, Mossad carried out the South American mission that captured notorious Nazi-on-the-run Adolf Eichmann.

But Mossad’s claim to history came after the tragic hostage situation that arose during the Munich Olympics in 1972. Israeli athletes at the Games were massacred, and the events were broadcast live on TV for the world to see. Mossad discovered the Arab terrorists responsible and carried out a brutal series of executions that were depicted in Steven Spielberg’s movie Munich. Oh, and if you doubt the brute power that Mossad wielded, the name of the mission to hunt down the terrorists was dubbed “Operation Wrath of God.”

9. CIA (United States)

You didn’t think you’d get very far into clandestine intelligence agencies without this one, did you? Officially founded in 1947, and with President Eisenhower’s building up in the 1950s, the Central Intelligence Agency, run from Langley, Virginia, has been in most of the greatest hits of espionage history.

The Bay of Pigs event in Cuba was a landmark happening during the Cold War-era 1960s. The CIA supported Cuban exiles who were to overthrow Fidel Castro’s communist regime. It failed miserably. Just after that botched coup, the CIA somewhat redeemed itself by using then-state-of-the-art technology to discover Russian nukes nearby.

The CIA did considerable work during the Vietnam War, as well. They undertook Project Tiger, which dropped South Vietnam fighters into the north to gather intelligence. Also during this time, however, were the operations known as the “Family Jewels.” These covert ops were usually illegal, ranging from illegal surveillance to straight up murder of foreign officials. Since then, things have been a little less rambunctious, though they did have some part in the Iran Contra debacle of the 1980s, as well as some responsibility for failure to take terrorist attacks in the US seriously, pre-9/11.

8. MI6 (Great Britain)

MI6 isn’t just an organization that constantly disavows super-agent Ethan Hunt. They are a very real British government entity with quite a history. The first British intelligence organization, which MI6 gets its roots from, was founded in 1569, but its present form came around 1912, just before World War I broke out.

The 1930s and ’40s gained MI6 a reputation for being one the top spy agencies in the world, and they surely had a major part in training US agents once America entered the Second World War. Post WWII, MI6 had to shake off numerous infiltrations by Russian double agents, and by the ’80s and ’90s, had become a much more open, re-prioritized agency. Not to say they had lost their teeth; indeed, they still tracked and took down all sorts of evil folks, from war crime perpetrators to participants in the Libyan Civil War. And if you have any doubts as to the debonair style of spy that inhabits MI6, check out their headquarters in the above photo.

7. BND (Germany)

Founded during the Cold War in 1956, the Federal Intelligence Service (known in German as Bundesnachrichtendienst) is the largest agency of its kind in the world. Boasting 300 locations in the country, and over 6,500 employees, the organization spent its formative years like many other similar agencies: spying on the Russians. They did specialize in Middle East affairs, and in 1967 predicted the outbreak of the Six-Day War almost to the hour.

When the aforementioned terrorist attacks occurred at the Munich Olympics in 1972, the BND took the matters to heart, and began to truly build up their counter-terrorism capabilities–they almost single-handedly stopped an attack in India a few years back. But they are still spies at heart, and not always the most virtuous kind. In 2005 it was revealed that the BND was surveilling many German journalists. They are even reported to be storing 220 million sets of metadata culled from phone surveillance worlwide, and WikiLeaks is often sharing tons of data that they discover the BND is holding/hiding.

6. KGB (Russia)

Ah, the granddaddy of them all. Mother Russia’s notoriously-clandestine secret spy agency has been depicted in all sorts of media, most recently in The Americans. From 1954 until the USSR dissolved in 1991, the KGB had probably the most legendary reputation on this list, and for good reason.

Being the super secret organization in the most super secret region of the Cold War, much of what the KGB conducted is still classified to this day. At first, they specialized in espionage, and getting into the US and delving deep into their secrets. Early in the Cold War, the Soviets even got a spy ring into the Los Alamos facility where Americans were developing the atomic bombs. They infiltrated elections in Bangladesh in the 1970s, then again in Afghanistan later that decade.

In 1991, the head of the KGB, Vladimir Kryuchkov, and several others took the bold move to actually attempt to overthrow the government of the Soviet Union. The coup failed, and the country fell into chaos, dissolving and splintering, much like the KGB would.

5. ISI (Pakistan)

Speaking of the Afghan-Soviet Union relationship, the Inter-Services Intelligence agency of Pakistan had a huge role in that during the late ’70s and early ’80s. The ISI took the sides of the Afghan fighters clashing against the Soviets, and even worked closely with the CIA to train and fund them. That didn’t turn out to bite anyone in America eventually, right?

Once the Soviet Union fell in the early 1990s, the ISI provided all sorts of support to the emerging Taliban group, during Afghanistan’s Civil War. But the ISI doesn’t just meddle in Afghan wars. In contrast to some of the agencies here, the ISI recruits civilians as well as those in the armed forces. But the organization is not without its own far-reaching scandals. As mentioned before, the ISI worked with the Taliban, but it wasn’t until recently that we knew just how deeply they were connected. The ISI reportedly tampers with the elections of its own country, and were accused of taking money illegally from bank owners in Pakistan. Even Pakistani citizens that helped the CIA capture Osama bin Laden were detained by the ISI and imprisoned.

4. NSA (United States)

If the CIA is America’s big, hulking secret child, the National Security Agency is like its smaller, even sneakier brother. The NSA can be traced back to 1917, when the First World War showed just how badly good intelligence was needed. The agency (then called the Cipher Bureau) spent its infancy becoming incredibly adept at intercepting messages and telegrams going in and out of the United States.

The Cipher Bureau would soon morph into the Signal Intelligence Service. The expansion of the Japanese empire in the 1930s helped the agency expand itself, especially in its Pacific operations. And that was helpful after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. The SIS would crack all sorts of codes and keep Japan on their feet, but their intel wasn’t always perfect, even when they expanded into the NSA that we know today. Later in the 1960s, faulty information from the Gulf of Tonkin would lasso the United States into the Vietnam War. The NSA also came under scrutiny during the Watergate scandal. And they have a long history of surveilling famous civil rights leaders and political opponents like Jane Fonda and Martin Luther King, Jr.

3. MSS (China)

China has a long history of spy capers and espionage just like everyone else on this list, but their best-known and most powerful agency has only been around since 1983. The Ministry of State Security may also be the most secretive in the world.

Computer hacking is one of the more prevalent ways of spying that is being used in this age, and the MSS has a large hand in that. In 2018, the US Justice Department caught two hackers who were acting on behalf of the MSS, who had stolen state secrets from a dozen countries. Another recent event saw a senior official in the MSS arrested in Belgium for stealing trade secrets from US aviation and aerospace companies.

The MSS is akin to a cross between the FBI and the CIA, as it conducts operations both domestic and foreign in the name of national security. The MSS has no official website or any list of contacts, and it’s even thought that China’s rapid economic growth can be attributed in part to the MSS and their keen ability to steal intellectual property from other nations.

2. Direccion de Inteligencia (Cuba)

Formed shortly after the Cuban Revolution in the early 1960s, the Direccion de Inteligencia has also been closely linked to the KGB, and were basically trained by them. Not surprising, since the Soviet Union held nukes on the island for some time. But it was a rocky relationship at times, too. Though the Soviets had personnel and facilities based in Cuba, their desire to have more of a say in the operations of the native Cuban agency led to some push-back.

The Direccion de Inteligencia has a long history of aiding leftist movements in other countries like Nicaragua, Chile, and Venezuela. The scope of the DI’s operations is somewhat staggering, considering the economic base of Cuba isn’t very impressive. Recently, it was revealed that Cuba and the DI had been sending weapons to North Korea for refurbishment.

It turns out that Cuba is just good at espionage. Intelligence experts rank the DI’s officials as some of the best in the world, and with the agency’s close ties to other countries like Iran and North Korea, its investment in gleaning intelligence from the world’s superpowers is not just attractive to radical governments.

1. OSS (United States)

A precursor to America’s CIA, the OSS had a very short life as an agency, spanning three years from 1942-1945, but they packed some work into that time. The activities of Germany during World War II were a main focus, and something the Office of Strategic Services excelled at. At its height, the OSS employed 24,000 workers, and the war provided many locations for the Americans to gain intel on their foreign enemies.

Some of the names that worked for the OSS were celebrity chef Julia Child, film director John Ford, and Major League Baseball player Moe Berg, and eventually the OSS was so spread out into the world that over 7,500 agents operated overseas. Again, the outbreak of world war provides so much work potential. The identities of OSS personnel were kept secret upon the agency’s dissolution in 1945, after Harry Truman took office, and were not revealed until 2008. The CIA would begin its life two year later in 1947, but America had already taken its baby steps in the intelligence world, and so was quite prepared.


Spy vs Spy vs Spy –

WIF Did You Know?

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 170

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 170

 …When a covert operation goes awry, you have no idea what may be coming down the pike…

The FBI guy recounts, “I am looking at a list of fatalities and it is scary:

Characters CC-FM-001>Ernesto Pacelli, the Pope’s Brother – we’re going straight to hell.

>Two Mastadon stooges – hey, good stooges are hard to find.

>Vincent Wolfgram, Mastadon field supervisor? Struck by lightning – now that’s original.

>Bart Simpson, the McGraw-Hill publisher who was really a nice guy.

>Martin Kamen, a colleague of Libby’s, incinerated at Argonne – Illinois is lucky the fire didn’t spread to the nukes!

>Jesse James Daniels, a CIA agent… What in the Sam-hell is the goshddamed OSS doing anywhere nears our business? And now you make a casual mention of Libby being dead. Shouldn’t that have been the end of things right then and there? Every single interested party in this case is dead.”

“We did not count on this private investigator from Florida sticking around. She was hired  to help locate Libby, after he went missing.”

“She… as in a woman?” The Deputy Attorney General makes a solid guess.

“Yes, Constance Caraway.”

“Wait, err, just a minute… is that the same broad who nailed that Nazi double agent sniffing around the atomic bomb? Please don’t tell me we hired her, she’s too much a straight shooter and loopy partner of hers…”

“No, Kamen did and that’s what we can’t figure out, even with Kamen out of the picture, she is still bird-dogging the case,” Conroy is baffled. “In fact she mustered the entire CPD and they called in the Illinois National Guard to shake down that Greenwood house.”

“I thought we had the CPD in our pockets.”

“We do, but they were never briefed on what we’re doing regarding Mastadon, or even that we’ve owned 5046 for years.”

“Then why don’t we haul the bitch in and stash her where the sun doesn’t shine.”

“Not only does she have her agency partner involved, but a flyboy boyfriend and some hick lawyer from Florida.”

“Oh swell and can you throw in Mother Teresa?”

“No, Billy Graham.”

“Jesus, this is all I need, McGrath is going to have my head!” Deputy Malone answers to a superior, the Attorney General of the United States. “You tell our Mr. Winters that he should get busy on some of these targets, he missing the mark.”

When a covert operation goes awry, you have no idea what may be coming down the pike.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Awry

Forever Mastadon


page 145

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 165

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 165

…If we can handle political conventions and all those crazies, I think we can handle one house…

“What can you tell us about the organization called Forever Mastadon?” asks the higher ranked flatfoot, the very first law enforcement hereabout to ever/even admit to wondering what has been going for months in the greater Chicagoland area.

Constance steps into the interrogation, FM is the group behind the abduction of Willard Libby, a scientist affiliated with the U of C. not to mention all the other crap they have pulled on anyone connected to the poor man. They have an agenda, one where he keeps his research to himself.”

“Do you have an address for these people; somewhere we can put a stop to this?”

Greenwood 5046

5046 South Greenwood

“Yeah, 5046 South Greenwood, that would be a good place to start, at this point Constance would not mind having a 2,000 man police force pitch in on this battle, “but if you go there, I’d make sure you have enough men. You will not believe what you’re up against — we do, though being able to explain it to you in advance is hard. You should form your own opinions.”

“Say, aren’t you the broad who shot those two guys on the North side? It was the talk of the department.”

That was me, yes. I took out the two guys who kidnapped Fanny two months ago, then Edie a month back,” her mea culpa comes without remorse. “Don’t you sense a trend going on here? Two rooms of this hospital hold repeat victims of these creeps.”

“Would you be willing to lead a team of tactical officers on a sweep of that Greenwood address?”

“Would I? Hell, I am ready to put another hurt on that bastard.”

“Another? You talk like you have a history with their leader.”

“Yeah, you could say he’s one hell of a handful. If you would let me, I’d like to bring in Agent Daniels-001an expert, he’s with the CIA. He possesses a particular set of unique skills, been on this case longer than me and Fanny.”

“If you can get him here by tomorrow, you have a deal.”

“You can find me at these numbers, telephone and street over on the university campus.” Connie was born to the big time. “One unmarked comes and gets get us before dawn, but I want you to understand one thing… we — Agent Daniels and me are going to be in charge of the operation.”

“I’ll have all the men in our district on the scene, riot gear, gas masks, blast shields, the whole shot. If we can handle political conventions and all those crazies, I think we can handle one house.

Famous last words?


Constance Caraway P.I.

FM Biz-001

Forever Mastadon


page 141

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 121

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 121

…at least the spy can jettison the two Vatican and Hades of his five aliases. “The Rogue” – Jesse James – Daniels will carry on…

Pentateuch ponders his shrinking prospects.

“Establishing a strategic base with both the requisite temperature control and placementDark Ages-001 near an iconic religious confluence is critical, Cephus. Find me another one before the day is out.” Because of the eternal heat of his primary dwelling place, where this fallen angel must spend the majority of his time in the company of dead non-believers, he has found it necessary to regenerate his countenance in a refrigerated environment while spending time “above” the Lake of Fire. “I have had that building since before my faithful servant Petrarch’s corruption had to give way to that tepid reawakening movement. I so long for another dark age! ”

The age of forgetfulness was a fertile playground for nearly a millennium. He attempts to add a historical frame for his cause, into the soul of Cephus, his double-dealing doer are dark deeds.

And Pentateuch has a singular way of summoning his subjects, lacking the omnipotence of the Divine One. It is definitely off-worldly and without a physics elucidation, and can be directed at a single person; the intended target hears things that are inaudible to everyone else.

Daniels/Spencer/Cephus has that exclusive receptor and though it startles him every time, he generally responds, in accordance to his nefarious duties. Considering the recent setbacks suffered by his current manic manager, Agent Daniels has been removed from his “Spencer/Cephus” umbrellas byconspiracy the CIA home office, in a preemptive attempt to save him from harm. They cannot remove any telepathic traces that remain, but at least he can jettison the two Vatican and Hades of his five aliases. “The Rogue” – Jesse James – Daniels will carry on.

The Dark Deceptor seeks to regroup, calling out to his now vacated assistant, but no one is home. Daniels girds himself, while aftershocks are being felt around the world, even in places without major continental faults; Geiger Counters chatter in the wake of a big planetary belch.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 106

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 81

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 81

…Agent Daniels – The Man of Many Hats…

The OSS (Office of Strategic Services) forerunner of the modern CIA, had served its purpose during the recently concluded world war; somebody had to keep the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines on the same page. There is a danger when separate organizations do not share intelligence and the OSS virtually forced them to. If that essential fact is a lesson learned, then it becomes an important memo to the future and heeding it is highly recommended.

In the case of the Libby Affair, the military plays no part. Domestic matters are left to people like Agent Daniels, who operate on the opaque fringes of the world stage; no first names required.

As Cephus, to Forever Mastadon, Agent Daniels is a Vatican insider who leaks PapalWorld Agnostica-001 matters. He provides advanced notice of where the Pope is going and what his agenda is. Keeping track of the Pope is one of “their” obsessions. And it is because of this usefulness, that Cephus/Daniels/Rogue is being brought into the inner circle, not of FM but the mysterious World Agnostica Unlimited.

Agnostica has not made the connection between the name Cephus and the bible; had they dug a little deeper they would have discovered that Cephus was Noah’s fourth son, Noah representing God’s greatest display of omnipotence; all of Satan’s (best) vanquished in favor of God’s (hand picked), i.e. The Flood.

Inside an innocuous building on Via Catone,  in not one of Rome’s finer neighborhoods, Cephus has been summoned to the top floor. There is no elevator to confuse what number that floor would be. Elevators were not invented in the 19th century A.D. and judging by the well-worn Italian granite steps, by centuries of heavy use, it is in accord with the outwardly abandoned appearance on this sleepy public way.The_Great_Deception

Be it at four or five stories, the steps end at the top, yet the mean temperature has dropped with every level, from a moderate 16 outdoor degrees Celsius to minus 2, below freezing, without the assistance of compressed ammonia.

Daniels/Cephus will set aside any possible explanation for later, having been met in the hall by Canisso/Wolfgram, dedicated defender of “The Great Deception”.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 75

 

Secret Agencies – Plundering Our Privacy

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10 Infamous Secret Agencies

10-Infamous-Secret-Agencies

A Brief History

On April 13, 1953, the US Central Intelligence Agency launched Project MKULTRA, attempting to learn how to use drugs and other techniques for the purpose of mind control. Unfortunately, the CIA did not help its reputation by using unsuspecting innocent people as human guinea pigs.  Many secret agencies, whether for the purpose of international intrigue or homeland security, have brought fear and distrust upon themselves, whether deserved or not.  Sometimes the fear is from people who richly deserve to be afraid, sometimes the fear is from innocent people.  Here are 10 secret agencies infamous for either ruthlessness, bungling, deadly efficiency, disregard of law, or any combination of these. Which agencies not listed here would you include?


Snooping, ever snooping…….

10. Okhrana, Imperial Russia.

Serving Imperial Russia until the communist revolution, the Okhrana was the prototype for all the other Soviet and Russian secret police that followed.  A feared unit using undercover agents to undermine trade unions and political opposition, they were not above killing people perceived to be enemies of the state.  The secret police tradition did not die out with Imperial Russia, nor with the Soviet Union, and it lives today by another name in the Russian Federation.

9. Praetorian Guard, Rome.

We will include the Frumentarii along with the Praetorian Guard as they co-existed from 753 BCE to 476 CE, functioning as bodyguards and henchmen for the emperor, sometimes used to gather information or sent to do political dirty work.  Unfortunately for Roman nobility, the so called body guards sometimes had their own agenda and several Roman emperors were killed by their own Praetorian Guard!  The successor organization was the Agentes in Rebus, that operated from the 400’s to the 800’s CE in a more clandestine fashion, similar to modern agencies such as the Gestapo or KGB.

8. Office of Strategic Services, United States.

The OSS came to life during World War II and shortly after the war was disbanded by becoming the CIA. During the war the OSS engaged in all sorts of clandestine operations using American and foreign agents to sabotage enemy operations and gather intelligence, as well as spread misinformation.  (Note: Most of these agencies also engage in spreading misinformation. So does the weatherman!)  The OSS is remarkable for starting from scratch and making it up as they went along.  Led by Maj. Gen. William Donovan, the OSS was also allegedly involved in assassinations.

7. National Security Agency, United States.

Unlike the portrayals on television and in the movies, the NSA does not have field agents killing people and blowing things up.  They are an intelligence gathering agency that targets electronic, communication, and photographic intelligence.  In the news recently for monitoring telephones and computers inside the borders of the US, the NSA has taken quite a step backwards in the public opinion.

6. Secret Intelligence Service, MI-6, United Kingdom.

Bond, James Bond. You would almost expect Miss Moneypenny to answer the phone if you called MI-6.  The image of a dashing and debonair James Bond gives an unrealistic but aura of competence to the SIS. In existence for over 100 years, the British government only acknowledged the existence of MI-6 in 1994. A s with the “No Such Agency” in the US, the public had already heard of it.

5. SAVAK, Iran.

After being set up by the CIA for the Shah of Iran, the SAVAK only had from 1957 to 1979 to earn a miserable reputation as murderers and torturers.  The fear and loathing inspired by the SAVAK certainly must have outweighed any good they did for the Shah, and this disgust had a lot to do with the revolutionary fervor that overthrew the Peacock Throne. Some of the atrocities alleged to have been inflicted on Iranians by the SAVAK include putting broken glass and pouring boiling water in victims’ rectums!

4. Mossad, Israel.

Not just intelligence gathering and counterintelligence, the Mossad apparently also works as a “hit squad” when needed.  An example would be exacting revenge for the 1972 Munich Olympic terrorist slaughter of Israeli athletes, after which Mossad agents went around the globe searching for and killing the perpetrators.  Since Israel does not acknowledge Mossad operations, every time some terrorist gets murdered the Mossad is blamed, only increasing its fear factor.  When you answer your cell phone and it explodes taking your head with it, that may have been the Mossad!

3. Gestapo, Nazi Germany.

These goons in the black uniforms are pretty much the iconic image of what we think of when we think of secret police.  The terror of German citizens who may have let slip a “defeatist” word or two, or perhaps spoke out against murdering the Jews, the Gestapo also terrorized the German occupied countries during World War II.  Another short lived agency, their legacy will seemingly last forever as the most archetypical secret police organization.  Now, sign zee papers old man…

2. KGB, Soviet Union.

Known in the Soviet Union as The Committee for State Security, who could question the purity of their motives? Similar to the CIA, FBI, and Secret Service rolled into one, the KGB was a worthy successor to the Russian and Soviet secret police and intelligence agencies that preceded it (including the Okhrana, Cheka, NKVD, and GRU).  Known to use all the nifty spy gadgets that you would expect in a movie, such as hollowed out coins, poison pens and umbrella tips, secret cameras and microphones, hidden weapons and everything else a spy could want for Christmas, they were not above using heterosexual and homosexual sex traps to blackmail Westerners.  The KGB is not really gone, or forgotten, just another name change.  Oh, and that Putin guy causing all the trouble lately… he was KGB.

1. CIA, United States.

Not the oldest agency, but certainly the one that spends the most money.  The CIA even had its own airline during the Viet Nam War.  Supposedly not allowed to operate inside the United States, the CIA gathers intelligence (largely through HUMINT) and engages in counterintelligence overseas.  Additionally, the CIA has operated training and paramilitary operations using foreign nationals in both counter-insurgency and in attempts to disrupt foreign governments.  It is generally accepted that the CIA conducted various crackpot schemes against Fidel Castro in Cuba, trying to assassinate him with poisoned or exploding cigars or embarrassing him by making his hair fall out.  The experiments they did on unsuspecting innocent civilians with LSD and other drugs and accusations of torture and murder continue to haunt “The Company.”

Secret Agencies

– Plundering Our Privacy