Looney Tunes

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Top 10 Greatest Musical Moments

From Cartoons

 

Cartoons are an under-appreciated art form that most dismiss as either childish or immature. To those people, you’re stone-cold wrong; take their musical numbers, for example. Many times, a silly cartoon will feature complex tunes, performed by a full orchestra, that would rival some of the best “legit” pieces of music out there.

Here are ten musical moments from cartoons so awesome, we could legally sell this article as audible chocolate.

10. Tom And Jerry: The Cat Concerto

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Tom and Jerry are arguably the most famous cat and mouse team on the face of the planet, and their antics have been entertaining people for decades. The Cat Concerto features Tom (the cat, if you didn’t already know) playing the piano at a very formal recital. Jerry being a mouse, a creature that famously hates classical music, tries to ruin his fun. All of which is set to, and kept perfectly in time with, Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No.2. Playing that song on a piano already takes years of practice; now imagine the amount of time it took to animate a cartoon cat and mouse playing it, in the ’40′s!

The episode, while only 7 minutes long, showcases more musical talent and finger dexterity than every guitar hero video on YouTube combined. Not to mention it also won the duo their fourth Academy Award for Best Animated Short.

9. The Simpsons: Baby On Board

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Throughout their several-decade run, The Simpsons have had a number of great musical moments. Arguably the most famous is Homer’s Barbershop Quartet, which is a thinly veiled parody of the Beatles career.

The episode featured a central song, “Baby on Board.” Although the song itself wasn’t considered to be one of the finest featured on The Simpsons, the episode as a whole got more positive reviews than a French brothel that takes coupons. And when you’ve got 500 episodes under your belt, that’s pretty darn good.

8. South Park: Chocolate Salty Balls

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To an outsider, South Park is nothing more than crude jokes and even cruder animation. Which is kind of unfair, since the show is probably one of the best produced animations out there, with a turnaround quicker than virtually anything else on air. No really, Matt Stone and Trey Parker are reportedly able to churn out an episode in around 4 days, and their musical numbers are recorded in roughly the same way.

The crown jewel in the South Park musical catalog has to be “Chocolate Salty Balls” by Chef (Isaac Hayes,) if only because they released the song as a full-length single that tells you how to actually make them. So if you have an hour free, you should probably, you know, go make some salty chocolate balls. Grandma will love them.

7. Animaniacs: Yakko’s World

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Music was one of the defining elements of Animaniacs, which was partly on the repeated insistence of director Steven Spielberg, who felt that music gave the show an edge. The end result was that each episode had music performed by a full 30-piece orchestra, because if you’re going to do something, do it right.

The show actually won an Emmy for its theme song, which was still nowhere near as good as “Yakko’s World,” which was unbelievably recorded in one take, in real time. Where’s Yakko’s award, America?

6. SpongeBob Squarepants: Goofy Goober Rock

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Spongebob is an odd show; although the animation and content is clearly aimed at small children, it’s gained a significant following with older people, because, well, it’s all kinds of awesome.

The show’s music is also singled out several times in its frankly insultingly-long list of awards. But, of everything the show has ever done, nothing comes close to “Goofy Goober Rock,” which features a guitar solo so intense, and demanding on the fingers of the person playing it, women hearing it close their legs out of pure instinct.

5. Family Guy: I Need A Jew

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You can insult a lot about Family Guy: its writing, its lazy jokes, or the fact that it takes cheap shots at people who don’t deserve it. But one thing you can’t insult is the shows musical numbers. Although the writers seem happy to make cheap jabs for laughs, the musical team work their damn asses off, with all the music you see on the show being created by a full orchestra. Seth MacFarlane himself is credited as being a musical genius, with a voice made of silken honey. It’s kind of a shame then, that he got his award for singing a song about Jews, in the voice of a retarded guy, instead of his natural singing voice.

4. Samurai Jack: Jack And The Rave

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Samurai Jack is a show that follows the journey of a nameless samurai (Jack is a nickname.) The show received multiple awards for its simple, yet bold, outline-less art style.

Now, music played a large role in tension building and scene setting for  the show. But in no episode was music more focused upon than, Jack and the Rave. In it, the titular samurai tries to free a group of children from the evil clutches of a sinister DJ who plays evil rave music. The accompanying soundtrack is from the same series that did an almost completely silent black and white fight, between a samurai and a ninja. When you have a show that can contain those two things, you win at cartoons forever.

3. Metalocalypse: Dethklok’s Entire Catalog

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This is a show that focuses on the adventures of the most metal (and entirely fictional) band in the world, Dethklok. Since the show’s inception, the band has released three full-length, critically acclaimed albums, and have gotten real world endorsements from actual companies. Most flesh-and-blood bands would kill for that chance, and a bunch of cartoon characters have pulled it off. What’s their excuse?

But here’s the thing; the music on the show isn’t just metal as Hell, it’s almost entirely technically accurate. Every note, every solo, and every drum beat is synced up perfectly because, why wouldn’t it be? Considering that every song contains at least one face-melting solo, that’s pretty damn impressive.

2. Scooby-Doo: The Theme Song

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Scooby-Doo has been around for decades, and has made an impact on pop culture so big that the pup has his own gravitational pull. The show has been remade several times, though one thing has remained fairly constant: its theme song, which has been covered by more bands than the National Anthem. For some reason though, the show has yet to an award for its music, which is a damn shame, considering just how damn catchy that theme is. You’ll always be a winner to us, Scoob. Always.

1. Looney Tunes: What’s Opera Doc?

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What’s Opera Doc is, quite simply, the finest piece of animation ever committed to film. That’s not mere hyperbole, for once; the short is consistently nominated as the greatest cartoon ever by industry experts, and it’s really not hard to see why.

Opera, although held in high regard by people who wear a tuxedo for breakfast and eat fancy mustard with their toast, is not a love shared by everyone. We don’t all enjoy watching overweight people sing for three hours, but everyone loves seeing a rabbit do it for six minutes. Everyone.

Looney Tunes

Self Help

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Mark Twain

“Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.”
― Mark Twain

“Our first instinct, in this day of WebMD, is to self-diagnose…….wait I may be misrepresenting a wider audience…..Dr. Gwenny: “If you have spring fever, take one plane and two suitcases and head for the Caribbean.”

Example: “If you see someone who is choking, stand behind them and *crush their chest.”
*(compress)

Self Help Healing

Who’s on First? (Ch10 pgs 129-132)

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“Who’s On First?”

“The African Queen, no thank you. They are sentenced to hang……..I read the book.”

“Me too, and if you remember, Rose and Charlie sink the Louisa and live happily ever after.”

“We can hop a freighter to Malta, and then catch an island hopper over to Rome, one-two-three.”

“Count to three and say N O.”

“I get us to Morocco and I believe we can find a more conventional route to Rome. Come on, don’t you remember the flying boats?”

“That is another story from another time,” she harkens back to the Hong Kong Clipper. “I like the friends fly free program you are offering.”

“I will get us on the next Globemaster…….that is one great plane!” If he had his way, he would be sitting in the pilot’s not the jump seats. He is the boss of his own airplane, “I believe they cross the big pond on Mondays, so I’ll fly us down to Brookley Sunday night.”

“That gives us the weekend to bum around.”

“Yes, I want to meet all the characters you have been talking about.”

“The University of Chicago is where we’ll start; it’s only 10 minutes from here. Willard Libby is the only reason we came up to the great white north,” when she and Fanny landed in Illinois their lives began to change. “He is an amazing story, was catatonic when we found him, but when you meet him, you wouldn’t know it.”

“So you have him in hiding?”

“Yeah, they had a funeral for him last week……..yes I know it’s bizarre, but the man wouldn’t survive on the street.”

“All this because he was shaving a few years off the age of Earth?”

“More than a just a few years and it turns out there is an unbelievable conspiracy to shut him up.”

“Ah ha, the bad guys think they have done just that?”

“Isn’t that beautiful,” she gloats? “But the hits just keep on coming—people are still dying and there is no letting our guard down.

“And good folks, like Eddie Dombroski’s family and our neighbor Betty are being kidnapped, shot or bombed. This needs to stop.”

“Good, let’s stop the bastards, I’m in favor of that, but the last time I checked God could have stopped the devil, before he got going, but he didn’t and WE, little ol’ us is going to do it?”

“According to our Agent Daniels, the double agent’s double agent, an act of God took care of one bad guy. That ties the score and I am going to be on the winning side.

“Sometimes you pick the fight, other times the fight picks you.”

At times you pick the flight, except when Uncle Sam throws you a curve. After flying into a general aviation airstrip outside Mobile, they cab over to Brookley Air Force Base, only to find that they’ve been bumped from this Monday’s flight.

Following a high level pow-wow, he is ready to face the music.

“What’s the deal AB? I was under the impression that you were calling the shots.”

“I forgot that a certain Army Air Forces general is in charge of this base,” he is uncharacteristically sheepish.

“Okay, let me see, did you have an affair with the man’s wife,” she aims below the belt?

“Not talking woman trouble,” he comes clean about a serious transgression. “I borrowed a P-51 for a few days.”

“Is that a no-no?”

“That would be a court martial…..were I an active service member.”

“So you have an outstanding warrant?”

“No, he wanted to extract a different type of penalty. I was supposed to take his step-daughter to the base’s New Years dance. Unfortunately he has a good memory.”

“That is strike two, so now what? I do not have a week to waste and we don’t have time to book a Pan Am or TWA transatlantic, which would cost us beaucoup bucks by the way.”

“We’re back on the plane CC.”

“He swings at a 0-2 fastball…..it’s a single to left field.”

AB “At least I’ve finally made it to 1st base with you.”

CC “Oh you mean who.”

AB “What do you mean?”

CC “No, what’s on 2nd.”

AB “I don’t know!”

CC “He’s on 3rd

CC “You saw Abbott and Costello on TV too?”

AB  “Yes, yesterday.”

CC “He’s in right field. Then you know that nobody scored.”

AB “I am nobody!”

“Cute. I’ll buy us a big shrimp dinner,” CC cuts the wordplay short, in favor of her favorite seafood restaurant on Mobile Bay. She adds a climatological comment, “It is so nice to wear normal clothes for a change.”

“When I first saw you at Meigs, I thought you were an Eskimo.”

“I could order room service.”

“You must be talking about Trader Joe’s; they have a surf ‘n turf that I would trade my pilots’ license for.”

“I’m buyin’, you’re flyin’!

File:Abbott and Costello.jpg

William “Bud” Abbott and Lou Costello (born Louis Francis Cristillo), were an American comedy duo whose work in vaudeville and on stageradiofilmand television made them the most popular comedy team during the 1940s and 1950s. Their patter routine “Who’s on First?” is considered one of the greatest comedy routines of all time and set the framework for many of their best-known comedy bits.”

Gwenny