Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 71

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 71

…Eddie D. has a dream PART 1…

That next night, while Eddie D. was back at home having finished his Elgin undertaking, with that and the rest of their doings continuing to be shielded from Pentateuch, asleep in his bed, he is given a dream.

He has a vision of himself sitting up in bed and being lead away by a comely waif. They go to an unknown place, like nothing Chicago has to offer, lofty and commanding. Below he can see himself, at some ceremony being presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Howard McGrath, the Attorney General of the United States. It seems weird, to this dreamer, that he is receiving an award for civilian service, when he is in fact a member in good standing of the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars). But in this alternate reality, he is rewarded for his heroic work in capturing foreign nationals who were threatening the nation s during the end days of WWII; Communists, Nazis, Fascists, sympathizers, spies.

“We the members of the Cabinet of the United States of America hereby award Edward Eddie's Cousins-001Francis Dombroski the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of these United States.”

All of Eddie’s many repeated stories whither in the specter of this fresh personal notoriety. Not only that and but all of his cousins were there cheering him adoringly, how cool is that?

The headlines will read:

“Chicago’s Eddie Dombroski to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Roosevelt”

He doesn’t realize that the Medal of Freedom is fairly common, as compared to the Medal of Merit or certainly the Medal of Honor, but none of those matters as Eddie is honored as a hero.

As good as that makes him feel, Eddie D. is sensing that same bone chilling cold that occupies a part of his recent memory, at North LaSalle Street and the phantom 39th Floor. ‘But I am a hero, my neighborhood is holding a block party in my honor, Mayor Kelly has declared November 12th Eddie Dombroski Day with the Key to the City and all,’ he whispers longingly.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 67

Dreams = Books = Movies – WIF Entertainment

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Books and Movies

Inspired by Dreams

Dreams are a combination of pictures and stories that develop in our minds while we sleep. Dreams can be about literally anything from something funny, to romantic, or even terrifying. While 95% of dreams are not usually remembered, it is believed that people dream anywhere from three to six times per night with each one lasting between five and twenty minutes.

While most dreams are never remembered, some people do recall specific details about them. And on a few rare occasions, people have been inspired by what they dreamed of. As a matter of fact, some great creations were developed from actual dreams. For example, the melody for the Beatles’ song “Yesterday“ was inspired by a dream. Paul McCartney woke up one morning with a tune stuck in his head that he didn’t recognize, so he composed the chords for it on the piano and it became the music for one of their most famous songs.

Another example is that of Edgar Allan Poe’s poetry. It has been said that many of his poems and short stories were inspired by the many nightmares he suffered from throughout his life.

There are also several famous books and movies that were inspired by actual dreams, 10 of which we’ll detail below…

10. E.B. White’s Stuart Little

The beloved children’s story of a mouse named Stuart Little was inspired by a dream that E.B. White had in the 1920s. The anything-but-ordinary mouse was born into a family of humans in New York City and lived with his parents, his older brother George, and a cat named Snowbell. While White had the dream in the ’20s, it was only put into a novel in 1945.

While he was sleeping on a train, White dreamt of a little boy who looked and acted a lot like a mouse. He wrote a few episodes about the boy/mouse and put them away with the intent of sharing the stories one day with his nieces and nephews. But around twenty years later his story became a best-seller and even inspired the 1999 hit movie Stuart Little, which starred Michael J. Fox as the voice of the mouse.

9. Sophie’s Choice by William Styron

In the mid-1970s, William Styron was struggling to come up with ideas to write another book. That’s when he experienced a dream that would inspire him to write Sophie’s Choice. He described the dream as “a merging from the dream to a conscious vision and a memory of this girl named Sophie. And it was powerful because I lay there in bed with the abrupt knowledge that I was going to deal with this work of fiction.” His vision of Sophie was that of her “entering the hallway of this humble boarding house in Flatbush with a book under her arm, looking very beautiful in the middle of summer with a soft of summer dress on and her arm bared and the tattoo visible.”

He felt like he had to write the Holocaust-themed story and in 1982 an acclaimed movie was made starring Meryl Streep as Sophie.

8. Christopher Nolan’s Inception

The 2010 psychological thriller Inception, a movie that is itself about dreams, was inspired by actual dreams. Director Christopher Nolan took the idea from his own lucid dreams for his seventh feature film. The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a talented thief who is very skilled at stealing secrets from people while they are dreaming. This new job, however, requires him to plant an idea inside the mind of a man instead of stealing it.

Nolan claims that Inception was an elusive dream. He said “I wanted to do this for a very long time; it’s something I’ve thought about off and on since I was about 16.” He also mentioned that ever since he was a kid, he was fascinated by how he would wake up and then fall back into a lighter sleep but still know that he was dreaming, and even manage to examine the location of his dreams.

7. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a novel written in the 1800s by Robert Louis Stevenson (pictured above) and is about a man who has a split personality – the good Dr. Jekyll, and the terrible Mr. Hyde.

It is said that Stevenson was fascinated with split personality disorder but was unable to figure out how to put it into writing. However, one night he dreamt about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: “In the small hours of one morning… I was awakened by cries of horror from Louis,” his wife Fanny explained. “Thinking he had a nightmare, I awakened him. He said angrily ‘Why did you wake me? I was dreaming a fine bogey tale.’”

Stevenson was apparently sick with tuberculosis and under doctor’s order to rest when he wrote the novel. He produced the first draft of 30,000 words in between three to six days, followed by a second rewritten copy in just three more days. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde sold 40,000 copies in just six months, followed by over 250,000 copies in North America. His novel has also inspired several movies over the years.

6. Stephen King’s Dreamcatcher

In 1999, Stephen King was hit by a minivan when he was walking down a road in Maine. During the time that he was recovering from a shattered leg and a collapsed lung, he started to have vivid dreams, which inspired him to write his horror novel Dreamcatcher.

The novel is about four friends who reunite in the woods each year for their annual hunting trip. But one year a stranger ends up at their camp, all confused and muttering about lights in the sky. The friends are then faced with a terrifying creature from another world and need to figure out how to survive.

He was quoted telling the San Francisco Chronicle, “The first really strong idea that occurred to me after the accident was four guys in a cabin in the woods. Then you introduce this one guy who staggers into the camp saying, ‘I don’t feel well,’ and he brings this awful hitchhiker with him. I dreamed a lot about that cabin and those guys in it.”

The novel was turned into a movie in 2003, which featured a who’s who of both on and off-camera talent, including Morgan Freeman and Lawrence Kasdan.

5. Stephen King’s Misery

Not surprisingly, Stephen King came up with the idea for his horror novel Misery from a nightmare. It is about a famous author who is rescued from a car crash by his number one fan. However, he soon realizes that the crazy fan has other ideas in store for him that include abuse and captivity.

King was quoted saying “Like the ideas for some of my other novels, that came to me in a dream. In fact, it happened when I was on Concord, flying over here, to Brown’s (hotel in England). I fell asleep on the plane and dreamt about a woman who held a writer prisoner and killed him, skinned him, fed the remains to her pig and bound his novel in human skin. I said to myself, ‘I have to write this story.’” And that’s exactly what he did. He wrote the first forty or fifty pages on the landing between the ground level and first floor of the hotel.

While his book was published in 1987, the movie Misery was released in 1990, starring James Caan and Kathy Bates.

4. Jason Mott’s The Returned

The Returned is a novel written by Jason Mott about an elderly couple who have a government agent show up at their home with their son. The only thing is, their son drowned fifty years ago on his eighth birthday. The boy looks and acts the same, but there’s no possible way that it could be their deceased son. Or could it?

In an interview with CNN, Mott described how the idea for the book came to him in a dream about his deceased mother. “In the summer of 2010, I had this dream that I came home from work one day and found my mother sitting at the kitchen table waiting for me.” He went on to say, “I came in and sat down with her, and we just talked about everything that had happened since her death.” He explained, “It was one of these really vivid dreams where you wake up and question whether it was real or not.”

He wrote a short story about a couple whose son returns from the dead and received a great response to it, so he continued writing it and a year later he had finished his manuscript which turned out to be a best-seller. It was later turned into a television series.

3. James Cameron’s Terminator

The 1984 hit movie The Terminator starred Arnold Schwarzenegger as a futuristic cyborg sent back in time to assassinate a woman whose unborn son will lead humans in a war against machines.

Director/writer James Cameron was staying at a hotel in Rome while working on Piranha II: The Spawning when a horrible flu and high fever hit him, causing him to have nightmares. In fact, he dreamt of a chrome torso appearing from an explosion and dragging itself with kitchen knives across the floor right at him.

He recalled when he came up with the idea for Terminator, “I was sick at the time. I had a high fever. I was just lying on the bed thinking and came up with all this bizarre imagery… I think also had the idea that because I was in a foreign city by myself and I felt very dissociated from humanity in general, it was very easy to project myself into these two characters from the future who were out of sync, out of time, out of place.”

2. Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight

Twilight is the story of a modern day love triangle between a vampire, a werewolf, and a human. The idea for the book came to author Stephenie Meyer in a dream. She explained her dream by saying “It was two people in kind of a little circular meadow with a really bright sunlight, and one of them was a beautiful, sparkly boy and one was just a girl who was human and normal, and they were having this conversation. The boy was a vampire, which is so bizarre that I’d be dreaming about vampires, and he was trying to explain to her how much he cared about her and yet at the same time how much he wanted to kill her.”

Prior to being a best-selling author, Meyer was a stay-at-home mother who was an avid reader but was never a writer. At first, she documented the dream so that she would remember it with no expectation of making it into a novel. But after nine rejections, her dream became a reality and her story is now known throughout the world by her Twilight books and movies.

1. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

In 1816, Mary Godwin and her fiancé, Percy Shelley, visited Lord Byron’s residence in Switzerland. During stormy nights, Lord Byron, who was a poet, would get his guests to read ghost stories to each other. One night, he asked his guests to write down their own horror stories.

After the request, this is what Mary claimed happened to her: “When I place my head upon my pillow, I did not sleep, nor could I be said to think… I saw – with shut eyes, but acute mental vision – I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some power engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion.” She described in great detail the dream that frightened her that night – the dream that inspired her famous novel, Frankenstein.


Dreams = Books = Movies

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The NULL Solution = Episode 143

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The NULL Solution = Episode 143

…The Null accepting nature will spread, eliminating the musty smell of judgement which hangs below the humidity laden clouds…

While Deke was consoling Joyner and pondering what it means to be human, Cerella is doing the heavy lifting. As in any organized civilization, laws are necessary to maintain order. If an individual or group gets out of line, there is a specific rule to point to. Now that the luster has worn off Eupepsia, she sees the need for anti-discrimination laws; for the Nulls retroactively and Joyner presently.

Princesses and Supreme Elders aside, Cerella takes matters one step further; directly to the governmental configuration.

“I am proposing institutional restructuring, my fellow elders. We are living in changing times. We can no longer operate in the mythical climate that blatantly ignores… even rebukes a large segment of our population.”

In a room filled to the brim with tower elders, and millions of ordinary spectators via visual link, the silence is palpable. Change comes hard and slow.

“I envision an inclusive body of leaders, located here at the base of Eupepsia the foundation of our culture, where every segment of our society will have a seat at the table. My dream is for Eridanus to be an example by which other worlds can model themselves after.”

The telekinetic chatter is nearly audible. Not all of it is negative.

“Each tower will choose a representative to participate at the Eupepsia Assembly, the new center for Eridanian unity!”

An entire population is glued to their video link. Eupepsia would no longer be viewed as the tower of the elite. It will be the Tower of the People.

The people are encouraged.

The Null have everything to gain and the Gifted have nothing to lose, that is unless deep-rooted prejudices cannot be set aside. Certainly the Null would not look at Joyner McKinney as a pariah. Their acceptance will spread, eliminating the musty smell of judgement which hangs below the humidity laden clouds.

Mimi and Eunice

Two votes were taken on a monumental day down the road; one silent, one using the Olde Language. The tower Eupepsia has been sanctioned by the majority of Eridanians to be the center of governance – cheered on by four Earthlings and witnessed by a very proud Ekcello. Eridanus, the world where people live an excessively long life, produces a milestone that rivals its storied beginnings. —

— In the sky, not so high that it cannot be seen by the whole planet, ⃝    shines brighter than ever before. Each individual Eridanian can see their reflection.

Lorgan.” Deke McKinney marvels.

Lorgan is witness to Eupepsia Dreaming.


The NULL Solution =

Photo: Shutterstock.com © Copyright Mopic

Episode 143


page 141 (end Ch. 13)

THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 213

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THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 213

…Deimostra has spent the final 15 hours sleeping, harmlessly dreaming of the people they were about to meet…

“I think we may have made a slight miscalculation about just how old the Newfoundlander is, considering this collection of spaceships.”

Photo by Lauren Hansen-Flauschen for Penn Museum

“Then how does one account for those never-before-seen artifacts in storage below, Sam?”

“Maybe they were lifted out of museum and the curators reported them as stolen. Or maybe they got lucky and found the stuff where no one else had looked before; I’m sure they had mass spectrometers long before we did.”

“No Sam, I’m telling you that modern man has not seen those treasures below! As for getting lucky — maybe, but not likely, considering the archaeological coverage in the Nile Delta.”

As NEWFOUNDLANDER shimmies into its pre-destined parking place, something occurs to Sampson’s astro-nautically trained mind, “Could it be that these people have abandoned space travel? I mean, did you see a fleet come out to escort us in? Have any of us seen any shuttle traffic, weather satellite or space station anywhere on the way here?”

Before Celeste can agree, the closing of the 100 foot tall doors distracts her and once again they are left to wonder what happens next. The enclosure now adds a claustrophobic slant to their rampant speculation. Confinement is a stark certainty, after over 5 years in the vastness of deep-space

Unease, doubt, apprehension: all these begin to consume Commander Sampson McKinney, formerly of Space Colony 1, recently employed NASA astronaut and previous inhabitant of Earth. It is all he can do to merely stand still and wait. The waiting is the hardest part.

“Have we landed yet Mother and Father?” Deimostra has spent the final 15 hours sleeping, harmlessly dreaming of the people they were about to meet, confined to her cabin for safety’s sake. Her feet have never been in contact with solid ground, but that is about to change. She has put on the dress Celeste had fashioned for this very portentous occasion, a feminine frock with as many little girl touches as were available on this male laden vessel.

“We have just landed dear one and we are inside a very, very…very large building.” She spins Deimostra around, tugging and adjusting clothing and hair. “These people are going to meet my pretty little girl.”

“When will we get to meet them?” she asks.

“I believe they would be coming through door number two!” Sampson hazards a cautious guess at the first sign of activity.

The next chapter of Earth’s history is about to be written.

The folks on Planet X is in for a surprise of historic proportion.


THE RETURN TRIP

Episode 213


page 252 (End Ch. 8)

Contents TRT

CONSTANCE CARAWAY P.I. ~ Episode 191

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Forever Mastadon ~ Episode 191

…Their perplexity and confusion is shared by the other Libbyites, subjected to similar horrible alternate worlds…

“Good morning sleepyhead,” Worth Moore is soliciting a response while he splashes water on his face from the washbasin. With the power grid tampered and terminated, the hotel that he is staying does not have a generator, so the only available alarm clock is the bright light of the new day. Fanny is sleeping in the other room, rolled up in her king-sized sheets, looking as if a cement mixer tossed her around.

She is slow to regain her bearings, scratching her head, “I had the strangest dream. Connie and me were back in Tallahassee, like sometime before Christmas. But when I saw you walking down Tennessee Street, you acted like you never met me before, like I was a total stranger.”

He is taken aback by her unsolicited comment, admitting, “I had a similar dream, only you did recognized me. But you told me that you didn’t want anything to do with men anymore… particularly me, because you found out that I was already married.”

“You aren’t, are you?” Any confusion can be attributed to a night jam-packed with infiltrated thoughts. As untrue as they may seem, the hallucinations are eerily real.

“I guarantee you that I am an honorable Southern Gentleman with the sincerest of purposes, Fanny Renwick. How could you doubt me?”

“After the past 3 months, I don’t know what to think.” Kidnapped, lost in a town without pity, wrongly accused of vehicular manslaughter, hospitalized and now this; her issue is what?

Their perplexity and confusion is shared by the other Libbyites, who as a group are subjected to similar horrible alternate worlds and nefarious nuisances as the other run-of-the-mill crusaders.


CONSTANCE CARAWAY P.I.

Episode 191


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CONSTANCE CARAWAY P.I. ~ Episode 153

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Forever Mastadon ~ Episode 153

Meanwhile

…while standing in the parking lot of Saint Anthony’s, there  comes the sound of screeching tires…

Popular Mechanics

As for Eddie Dombroski himself, he is pretty much a slave to the ventilator that keeps him breathing and the intravenous tubes that supply his nutrients. He has lost a lot of weight, along with most of that quaint enthusiasm which fuels all those stories he relates. He knows there are people in the room, but cannot focus well enough to interact with them. Constance fluffs his pillows and encourages him to drink some water, but so do any of his many nurses. Ace has brought him a Popular Mechanics magazine, which lights him up for a moment, but he definitely is not himself.

Billy Graham has summoned the hospital’s chaplain in order to bring a united spiritual front to the visit. Eddie has had his Saint Stanislaus Parish priest stop by several times, but a portable confessional is not what the man needs. Graham is a fierce prayer warrior that can save even the lost-est of lost, given the time to do so. The chaplain then will serve as spiritual reinforcement.

Eddie has related the strange dreams he was having concerning the devil and does so to this day. There is no doubt in Graham’s mind that they are in the midst of an epic battle, the Libby Affair folks are at the epicenter of Satan’s focus.

After an hour with some of his favorite people, there is renewed spring to this hospital bed. He asks about Fanny, about every ten minutes, telling Connie that he has his wife talking to Fanny every day, compared to every other week for Constance.

As they trio prepares to leave, while standing in the parking lot of Saint Anthony’s that’s not so large that you lose your car, there first comes the sound of screeching tires, a symphony of background noise of a big city.

They barely notice the commotion, when another car rushes into their isle, blocking the path of an oncoming four wheel projectile. The blocking car is t-boned, nearly causing it to roll onto its side…………..

 

 

 

 


 

CONSTANCE CARAWAY P.I.

Tune in tomorrow

…. for another exciting episode

Episode 153


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While You Were Sleeping

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J.M. Barrie

“You know that place between sleeping and awake, that place where you can still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always think of you.”
― J.M. Barrie

Stephen King

“Nightmares exist outside of logic, and there’s little fun to be had in explanations; they’re antithetical to the poetry of fear.”

― Stephen King

Dreams

“Dreams are formed and reside in an area called the garbage can of the mind. It is there where hope and fear are randomly tossed together, producing a story. Maybe I should call it the salad bowl of life?”

— Gwendolyn Hoff