Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 184

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 184

…The hard working people of the Midwest will be spared a case of the dreaded Dianetics, which should not be confused with Diuretics…

The Chicago Stadium holds over 21,000 people, for events like these that do not require a wooden court, skating ice, or rodeo dirt. Political conventions and circuses also take advantage of its cavernous interior. Truman was not nominated there, but Democrat F.D.R. was. Economically ill-timed Herbert Hoover and ‘don’t count your chickens before they hatch’ Thomas Dewey were Republican conventioneers. And rumor has it that idyllic Roy Rodgers lassoed to Dale Evans into matrimony, wowing the crowd with his six-shooter… how can a girl resist?

And isn’t it a crying shame, that the very run of Billy Graham Crusades takes the dates once promised to the departed Langston Richard Cannon and his Spiritual Engineering gaggle. The hard working people of the Midwest will be spared a case of the dreaded Dianetics, which should not be confused with Diuretics, though they have similar results in different parts of the body, 2 feet apart.

One thing for sure, the many thousands seeking charismatic attention will not be causing much of a ruckus on their own. Neither would the weather on Saturday March 10th, with a warm front pushing the thermometer near 60 degrees, though the penalty paid comes in the form of a foggy drizzle. But signs of an early spring are a gift from God, having paid the price of a usually harsh upper Midwest winter.

The stage is set for another attempt at causing revival. Actual revivals are normally born of prohibitionist personalities, because it is easier to guilt a person into becoming a believer, if you can point out their debauched behavior. Graham, however, has found more upbeat ways to bring his audience closer to their God, like convincing a life-long scientist to profess his belief that, in his field of expertise, he readily accepts the parameters of a divine Creation over the speculation of random Evolution.

Alongside Willard Libby will be a 500 person choir, a full orchestra (both recruit locally) Youth for Christ International speaker Charles Templeton and popular baritone George Beverly Shea.

Footnote: More than a few of the people attending each evening mention President Truman’s radio address touting Billy Graham as the reason they came out.


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 156

Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 79

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Constance Caraway P.I. ~ Episode 79

…The President’s Preacher…

As it turns out, The Libby Affair gets its own formal designation and has attracted the attention of those usually interested in only the biggest fish. Likely precipitated by the Italian Consulate and Ambassador to the United States Alberto Tarchiani, through Ambassador to Italy James Clement Dunn and up the food chain, the disappearance of Willard Libby, the death of the Pope’s brother and whispers of conspiracies all are attracting the eye of the White House. President Truman, already a lightning rod for controversy, has taken notice because of the “Preacher to Presidents” Billy Graham’s close involvement to the facts surrounding the Libby Affair.

In the course of their weekly devotional time, Graham points to the ethereal nature of the causes behind the affair and its evangelic tie-in, “I have had considerable dealings with all those involved in the mostly private investigation, no direct governmental concern, and I believe there are global consequences afoot.”

“Our Ambassador to Italy tells me of a recent visit by the Pope’s brother and his recent suspicious death. What details do you have to share with me,” Harry Truman needs an accurate assessment from a reliable source to know how to proceed.

“I would not be speaking out of class if I told you that I personally took interest in the meeting in Chicago, the one of which you refer to. Willard Libby was seeking the opinions of the Christian community about his very refined topic of the actual age of the Universe and our, I mean The Vatican and my, biblical interpretation. Considering all of our differences in doctrine, the single greatest area of agreement lay in the creation of mankind. We both laid out very similar views of creation’s timeline.”

“Why has this turned into a hornet’s nest Reverend Graham? Right now the free world is in a tug-of-war over the 38th Parallel and yet here I sit here with you like we are debating the merits of Sunday school.”

“Mr. President, we are approaching a slippery slope, a scenario in which religion is being pushed aside in favor of a godless society.”

“The Founding Fathers designed the Constitution around religious freedom, how can that be threatened?”

“The buck stops here” is a phrase that was popularized by U.S. President Harry S. Truman, who kept a sign with that phrase on his desk in the Oval Office The phrase refers to the fact that the President has to make the decisions and accept the ultimate responsibility for those decisions. Truman received the sign as a gift from a prison warden who was also an avid poker player. It is also the motto of the U.S. Naval Aircraft Carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).


Constance Caraway P.I.

Forever Mastadon


page 74

“Who Said that?” – WABAC Phrase Finder

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"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Let’s go looking for a big stick, Sherman My Boy.”

 

“Who Said that?” –   WABAC Phrase Finder

 

trsbigstick

Bluster back-story…

On September 2, 1901, the then Vice President of the United States, Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt first used his famous phrase “Speak softly and carry a big stick” in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair.  Presidents and other famous people have often uttered lines that has become closely associated with that person.  Here 10 of the author’s favorite utterances by famous people are listed.  What other catch phrases or signature lines captivate you?

Let’s listen in…

10. “I am not a crook.” Richard Nixon.

Twice elected vice president twice and twice elected president, and this simple line is how he is remembered.  This was one tortured, weird guy.

9.  “Well, there you go again.”  Ronald Reagan.

“…there you go again” what?!  Telling the truth?!  When confronted in presidential debates with actual facts contrary to the reality that he would have preferred, Reagan used this idiotic line against Jimmy Carter and then against Walter Mondale.  Incredibly, it worked, and the points failed to hurt Reagan.  In fact, many Americans thought it was profound (Too bad he did not also use “It is what it is.”).

8.  “Thank you, thank you very much.”  Elvis Presley.

Such a simple phrase, and yet most people know exactly who you are imitating when you utter it.  Another favorite thing Elvis liked to say was “taking care of business” or TCB.

7.  “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn.”  Clark Gable.

With this most famous line from the most-watched movie of all time (Gone With The Wind, 1939), Gable as Rhett Butler blew off Scarlett O’Hara, and men have copied the quote ever since, but usually without oozing the manliness of Gable.

6.  “The Buck Stops Here.”  Harry S Truman.

If only all politicians would live by this concept!  As president, Truman had this phrase sitting on his desk as a reminder to anyone who came into his office that he was taking responsibility for whatever went on.  You will notice there is no period after his middle initial.  This is because he did not have a proper middle name, just the letter “S.”  Perhaps that means his middle name was actually “S?”  Go figure.

5.  “I ain’t an athlete, lady. I’m a baseball player.”  John Kruk.

Major league baseball player John Kruk was an All Star 3 times and twice finished in the top 5 in batting.  Apparently not a role model, he uttered his famous quote while he was eating, smoking and drinking beer after a woman had chastised the overweight ballplayer for setting a bad example since he was an athlete.  This man is an inspiration to most American men.

4.  “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”  John F. Kennedy.

This remark is definitely one of the greatest lines ever spoken by an American president, and it is the line most often associated with JFK.  The words had some credibility because Kennedy himself was a war hero who had nearly died in World War II , and he had served in the Senate and White House despite being rich enough to not have to work.  Furthmore, his service to his country eventually cost him his life.

3.  “Veni, vidi, vici.” Julius Caesar.

I came, I saw, I conquered.  A boast to be sure, but a true one.  And what did he get for his troubles?  A bunch of guys in togas stabbing him to death!  Julius Caesar also popularized the phrase “Jacta alea est” (the die is cast), but the first quotation just sounds better.

2.  “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”  Bill Clinton.

In an ill-advised attempt to retain some kind of dignity, Clinton tried to lie his way out of a humiliating revelation about his personal life.  It did not work, and 8 years of an entire presidency is mostly remembered by this single sentence.

1.  “Speak softly and carry a big stick.”  Theodore Roosevelt.

This great line by one of our greatest presidents in regard to his foreign policy is indeed profound (Think of Dirty Harry talking softly while packing his big .44 caliber Magnum.).

 

“Who Said that?” –   WABAC Phrase Finder