FDR Four Freedoms – WABAC to WWII

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"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Let’s go back to when we really had freedoms that mattered.”

January 6, 1941:

FDR Delivers

Four Freedoms Speech

 Way Back to WWII

On January 6, 1941, much of the world was enmeshed in World War II, with only the United States among the great powers not yet at war.  Many US citizens wanted to keep it that way, and sentiment was largely against any involvement in the affairs of Europe where Hitler and Nazi Germany along with Italy were at war with Western democracies such as France and Britain, and Asia where Japan was fighting in China.

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Inside the script

US President Franklin Roosevelt publicly echoed the party line of non-involvement with the war, but he personally wanted to help the democracies resist totalitarian domination.  In his 1941 State of the Union speech Roosevelt addressed the security of the United States by recognizing that for the US to enjoy freedoms the country must exist in a world where such freedoms existed.

The freedoms delineated by FDR were:

The Freedom of Speech

The Freedom of Worship

The Freedom from Want

The Freedom from Fear

The speech about human rights and references to the US Constitution was a slap at the totalitarian dictatorships of the aggressive countries that had started World War II, the key instigators being Germany, Italy and Japan, along with our soon to be ally, the Soviet Union.  The speech marked an end of official US isolationism and direct support of the Western allied democracies stopping short of committing military combat involvement.  The speech was part of the introduction of the Lend-Lease program to provide war materiel to the Allies in exchange for the use of military bases and the transformation of the United States into “The Arsenal of Democracy,” a commitment to massive industrial mobilization to producing war weapons.

Although a stirring and inspirational speech that echoed throughout World War II and beyond, there were still detractors.  Many Americans were unconvinced to abandon their isolationism (until after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor) and the obvious disconnect with US mistreatment of African-Americans, Mexican-Americans and other minorities despite the avowed “rights of men of every creed and every race wherever they live,” just apparently not the US.  The detention of Japanese-Americans comes to mind as well.  Still, many consider this speech one of History’s greatest.

After the war, former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt took the Four Freedoms as her personal cause and advocated for human rights in the US and United Nations.  Despite his call for a massive armaments build up, FDR also called for nations to disarm as a way of keeping world peace.  The speech inspired painter Norman Rockwell to paint a set of 4 paintings depicting his vision of the Four Freedoms.  Other artists also rendered their depictions of these freedoms in paintings and posters, and the Marvel Comic superhero group, The Fantastic Four, was headquartered in the fictional Four Freedoms Plaza 1986-1998)  Postage stamps and other references to this speech have also appeared since, leaving a lasting legacy.

FDR Four Freedoms

WIF Politics-001

– WABAC to WWII

Martin Luther King Jr. – His Early Life

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Martin Luther King Jr. – Early Life

Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia, to ReverendMartin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King. His legal name at birth was “Michael King”. King’s father was also born Michael King. The father “changed” both names on his own during a 1934 trip to Nazi Germany to attend the Fifth Baptist World Alliance Congressin Berlin. It was during this time he chose to be called Martin Luther King in honor of the great German reformer Martin Luther.

Martin, Jr., was a middle child, between an older sister, Willie Christine King, and a younger brother, Alfred Daniel Williams King. King sang with his church choir at the 1939 Atlanta premiere of the movie Gone with the Wind.

King was originally skeptical of many of Christianity’s claims. At the age of thirteen, he denied the bodily resurrection of Jesus during Sunday school. From this point, he stated, “doubts began to spring forth unrelentingly”. However, he later concluded that the Bible has “many profound truths which one cannot escape” and decided to enter the seminary.

Growing up in Atlanta, King attended Booker T. Washington High School. A precocious student, he skipped both the ninth and the twelfth grades and entered Morehouse College at age fifteen without formally graduating from high school. In 1948, he graduated from Morehouse with a B.A. degree in sociology, and enrolled in Crozer Theological Seminary inChester, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated with a B.Div. degree in 1951. King married Coretta Scott, on June 18, 1953, on the lawn of her parents’ house in her hometown ofHeiberger, Alabama. They became the parents of four children: Yolanda KingMartin Luther King IIIDexter Scott King, and Bernice King. During their marriage, King limited Coretta’s role in the civil rights movement, and expected her to be a housewife.

King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, when he was twenty-five years old, in 1954. King then began doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston University and received his Ph.D. degree on June 5, 1955, with adissertation on “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman“. An academic inquiry concluded in October 1991 that portions of his dissertation had been plagiarized and he had acted improperly, but that his dissertation still “makes an intelligent contribution to scholarship”; the committee recommended that his degree not be revoked.

Martin Luther King Jr.

– Early Life

The Texas Rangers – WABAC to Real Border Security

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"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“We’re going to go back to the formation of the Texas Rangers, Sherman My Boy.”

“Swell, Mister Peabody, I love baseball!”

“Oh never mind.”

 

November 24, 1835: Texas Provincial Government Creates Texas Rangers

 Texas-Rangers-1835

Securing the border

On November 24, 1835, the Texas Provincial Government (Permanent Council) authorized the creation of a mounted para-military police force to enforce laws throughout The Republic of Texas and protect its borders.

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The men behind the badge

Stephen Austin had first formed the unit under the command of Captain Morris as an unofficial call for volunteers in 1823, while Texas was still the property of Mexico.  Texas became an independent republic in 1836, and was admitted as a state in the United States in 1845.  Although Mexico had welcomed American settlers to Texas, the Americans insisted on violating Mexican law by keeping slaves.  Fed up with the flaunting of Mexican law, Mexico decided to end immigration of Americans to Texas in 1830, triggering a war for independence from Mexico from 1832 to 1836 when Texas became an independent country.

Meanwhile, the Texas Rangers developed a reputation for courage and skill, and became known as an elite law enforcement force, fighting criminals, Indians, and anyone that threatened the settlers.   Disbanded briefly during reconstruction after the Civil War, Texas quickly reconstituted the force, and today it exists as The Texas Ranger Division of The Texas Department of Safety, not to be confused with the entirely separate Texas State Police.

With as many as 300 Rangers during the War for Independence, the Rangers maintained a small number of men afterwards, around 56 to 150 Rangers at a time.  Today, there are only about 150 Rangers, along with 66 support personnel.  Such is the reputation for toughness and effective law enforcement that the saying, “One riot, one Ranger.” (stemming from an 1896 Dallas illegal prize fight where only 1 ranger was sent to enforce the law when many seemed more appropriate) has come to symbolize the Spartan like reputation of this agency.

Part of the cachet of the Rangers can be traced to the arming of the Rangers with the Walker Colt revolver (1847), a massive .44 caliber handgun that outclassed all black powder repeating handguns in history.  In fact, the Walker Colt was the most powerful revolver produced until the introduction of the .44 Smith & Wesson Magnum in 1955!  Designed especially for the Texas Rangers by Ranger Captain Samuel Walker and Samuel Colt, the Walker Colt was made to stop an enemy decisively with one shot.  Only  super gunslingers could wield such a super pistol, and that was the Texas Rangers.

Throughout their history the Rangers have performed numerous law enforcement and paramilitary roles, including investigating murder and other crimes, fighting hostile Native Americans, protecting the Governor, putting down riots, and investigating political corruption.  Their reputation was enhanced by putting down notorious criminals such as Sam Bass and John Wesley Hardin.  A former Ranger was instrumental in killing Bonnie and Clyde.  During the height of range wars and Indian wars, the Rangers were accused of ruthless tactics such as summary execution and torture, but that only added to their mystique.  The Rangers protected the meeting between US President Taft and Mexican President Diaz in 1909, preventing assassination attempts on both statesmen.

During the period of upheaval in Mexico in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries the Rangers combated Mexican raiders along the border, killing as many as 3000 Mexicans from 1910 to 1919!  The brutality of the Rangers at this time was not ignored, and some of the Special Ranger units were disbanded, and the number of Rangers was reduced, reaching only about 45 Rangers during the Depression.  In fact, all serving Rangers were dismissed in 1933 by a reform minded state governor, and in 1935 the Rangers were placed in the Department of Safety where they remain today, maintaining all the reputation for toughness and effectiveness with a sterling reputation for professionalism.

The Texas Rangers have achieved almost mythical status as the epitome of rugged Western law enforcement and individualism.  A small, elite force, popular culture such as movies, books, and television has added to the legend.  Even the Texas Rangers baseball team has latched onto the reputation by taking their name.  You can visit the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas, established in 1968.

The Texas Rangers

– WABAC to Real Border Security

Facts About Halloween – More than Candy and Goblins

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Halloween Facts

– More than Candy and Goblins

Halloween-001

Halloween, or Hallowe’en (/ˌhæləˈwn, ˈn, ˌhɑːl/; a contraction of “AllHallowsEvening“), also known as AllhalloweenAll Hallows’ Eve, orAll Saints’ Eve, is a yearly celebration observed in a number of countrieson 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtide, the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows),martyrs, and all the faithful departed believers.

According to many scholars, All Hallows’ Eve is a Christianized feast influenced by Celtic harvest festivals, with possible pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain. Other scholars maintain that it originated independently of Samhain and has solely Christian roots.

Typical contemporary festive Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related “guising“), attending costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing anddivination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows’ Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular, although in other locations, these solemn customs are less pronounced in favor of a more commercial and secular celebration.Because many Western Christian denominations encourage, although most no longer require, abstinence from meat on All Hallows’ Eve, the tradition of eating certain vegetarian foods for this vigil day developed, including the consumption of apples, colcannon, cider, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.

Etymology

The word Halloween or Hallowe’en dates to about 1745 and is of Christian origin. The word “Halloween” means “hallowed evening” or “holy evening”. It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows’ Eve (the evening before All Hallows’ Day). In Scots, the word “eve” is even, and this is contracted to e’en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)enevolved into Halloween. Although the phrase “All Hallows'” is found in Old English (ealra hālgena mæssedæg, all saints mass-day), “All Hallows’ Eve” is itself not seen until 1556.

WIF would like to thank WikiPedia for being the great resource it is!”

Halloween Facts

The Devil’s Holiday

– More than Candy and Goblins

Shays’ Rebellion – WABAC to the 13 Colonies

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Peabody & Sherman-001

“Where are we going this time Mr. Peabody?”

“I am to introduce you to an important figure in the founding of the United States.”

The Story of

Daniel Shays

  History is rich

On this date, September 29, 1825, American soldier, revolutionary, and farmer Daniel Shays (c.1747–1825) died at age 78 in Sparta, New York.  In those storied 78 years, Shays became most famous for being one of the leaders of Shays’ Rebellion, a populist uprising against controversial debt collection and tax policies in Massachusetts in 1786 and 1787.  The seeds of that rebellion were planted nearly a decade earlier amidst a revolution…

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The rest of the story…

In a bitter struggle against the most powerful industrializing nation on earth, the thirteen colonies that would later be called the United States of America (U.S.), won their independence from Great Britain.  Victorious, the citizens of the new nation of America thought that their freedom from British rule would bring them together as a young and prosperous nation.  In some aspects they were right, but in others they were wrong.

By defeating, Britain, the Americans had proved themselves not only hard-workers, but also a new nation, held together by high ideals.  The Americans had a whole continent to explore and a new government to form.  The problems then that faced the Americans might not have been totally expected, but also could not have been a total shock.  It is not exactly easy trying to form a new country.

One such problem was the economy.  High taxes were imposed to pay for war debts, and in Massachusetts, the problem reached a dangerous level.  Although there was paper money in circulation, little of it was honored at face value.  When farmers were thrown into debt they wanted more paper money to help pay off some of their debts.  When the Massachusetts state legislature failed to issue paper money and reform the debtor laws, the farmers took action.

Daniel Shays, born in 1747 probably at Hopkinton, Massachusetts, and died September 29, 1825 at Sparta, New York, was a U.S. soldier who served as an Army Officer at the battles of Bunker Hill (1775), Saratoga (1777), and Stony Point (1779) in the American Revolution.  He later lead the uprising of several hundred male farmers to force the Supreme Court in Springfield to adjourn in September of 1786.  In January of 1787, Shays’s force of 1,200 men tried to attack a federal arsenal at Springfield.  There his revolt began to fall apart as the militia fired upon his party, before they could reach the arsenal.  As the militia pursued him, he was decisively defeated on February 4 at Petersham.  He then fled to Vermont.

At first the leaders of the rebellion were condemned to die for their treason, but they were eventually pardoned.  Later, Shays even received a war pension!

Shays’ Rebellion was not the only rebellion of its kind to take place in the newly independent U.S.  Several disturbances occurred in other states with the unsuccessful Whiskey Rebellion of 1791-1794, primarily in Western Pennsylvania, being the most famous.  Collectively and despite the rebels being technically defeated, these revolts resulted in two significant changes.  In Massachusetts, the state legislature created laws that would ease the economic condition of debtors.  On a larger scale, the Federal government became aware that it had to be strong enough to keep tranquility within its borders.  Although, Daniel Shays’ Rebellion to capture the arsenal had failed, he and his debt-ridden farmers had succeeded in helping to make the country strong and fairer and that is why we remember him on this 190th anniversary of his death on September 29, 1825.

Shays’ Rebellion

Thirteen Colonies

– WABAC to the 13 Colonies

Alpha Omega M.D. – Tallahassee Map

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Alpha Omega M.D.

– Tallahassee Map

Map-001

 Alpha Omega M.D.

People, Places, Things

Characters A.O.-001

Main Characters:

DOCTOR ALPHA OMEGA CAMPBELL

MAGGIE LOU CAMPBELL

ALPHA CAMPBELL (Mizzel) – #1 Campbell daughter

LAURA BELL CAMPBELL (McLoud) – #2 Campbell daughter

ZILLAH CAMPBELL (Shirley) – #3 Campbell daughter

FRANKLIN MCLOUD (LAURA BELL)

R. WORTH MOORE – A.O. Campbell attorney

GEORGE LEWIS – Lewis State Bank

Supporting Characters:

Frank Lightfoot – Starke Prison Guard

Warden Hayes – Starke Prison Warden

Charles Wilson – Capital Plaza Hotel

Samuel Goldblatt III – Holiday Inn Hotel Founder 

Vaughn Mizzel (Alpha husband)

Bill Shirley (Zillah husband)

Lettie Golden – Campbell nurse, family friend

Reverend Bill Johnson – Pastor Faith Resurrection Baptist Church

Places & Things:

TALLAHASSEE FLORIDA

STARKE PRISON

LEWIS STATE BANK

HOLIDAY INN

FRENCHTOWN


 

Tallahassee, Florida
State capital
City of Tallahassee
Top, Left to Right: Tallahassee Skyline, Florida Capitol Buildings, Unconquered statue of Osceola and Renegade at FSU, FAMU's Marching 100, Old St. Augustine Canopy Road, and Cascades Park

Top, Left to Right: Tallahassee Skyline, Florida Capitol Buildings, Unconquered statue of Osceola and Renegade at FSU, FAMU’s Marching 100, Old St. Augustine Canopy Road, and Cascades Park
Flag of Tallahassee, Florida
Flag
Official seal of Tallahassee, Florida
Seal
Nickname(s): “Tally”
Motto: “Florida’s Capital City”
Location in Leon County and the state of Florida
Location in Leon County and the state of Florida
Coordinates: 30°27′18″N 84°15′12″WCoordinates: 30°27′18″N 84°15′12″W
Country United States
State Florida
County Leon
Established 1824
Government
 • Type Commission–Manager
 • Mayor Andrew Gillum
Area
 • Total 103.5 sq mi (268 km2)
 • Land 100.3 sq mi (260 km2)
 • Water 3.2 sq mi (8 km2)
Elevation[2] 203 ft (62 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 181,376
 • Estimate (2014) 188,107
 • Rank 126th, U.S.
 • Density 1,809.3/sq mi (698.6/km2)
 • Urban 240,223 (153rd)
 • Metro 375,751 (140th)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code(s) 32300–32399
Area code(s) 850
FIPS code 12-70600
GNIS feature ID 0308416
Website www.talgov.com
Travel the world for 10 cents on the dollar

Travel the world for 10 cents on the dollar

Tallahassee /ˌtæləˈhæsi/ is the capital of the U.S. state of Florida. It is the county seat and only incorporated municipality in Leon County, and is the 126th largest city in the United States. Tallahassee became the capital of Florida, then the Florida Territory, in 1824. In 2010, the population was 181,376, and the Tallahassee metropolitan area is 375,751 as of 2014. Tallahassee is the largest city in the Northwest Florida region.

Tallahassee is home to Florida State University, ranked the nation’s forty-third best public university by U.S. News & World Report. It is also home to the Florida A&M University, one of the country’s largesthistorically black university by total enrollment. Tallahassee Community College is a large community college which serves mainly as a feeder school to both Florida State University and Florida A&M University. Tallahassee qualifies as significant college town with a student population exceeding 70,000.

Tallahassee is a center for trade and agriculture in the Big Bend (Florida) region and Southwest Georgia and is served by Tallahassee International Airport and Interstate 10. As a capital city, Tallahassee is home to the Florida State Capitol, Supreme Court of Florida, Florida Governor’s Mansion, and nearly 30 state agency headquarters. The city is also known for its large number of law firms, lobbying organizations, trade associations and professional associations, including the Florida Bar and the Florida Chamber of Commerce. It is also a recognized regional center for scientific research, and home to the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.

Alpha Omega M.D.

Doc Campbell-001

– Tallahassee Map

WABAC to the Super Guppy – WIF Aviation

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"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“We’re going to see a guppy, Sherman My Boy.”

“My guppy’s name is Clyde.”

“This fish can fly.”

“Super.”

 First Flight of

the Super Guppy

 superguppy2

You have to see it…

On August 31, 1965, fans of super-different airplanes could add another oddity to their list when the Aero Spacelines Super Guppy made its first flight.  A bulbous looking whale of an airplane, the Super Guppy was the successor to the Pregnant Guppy, an equally goofy looking giant cargo plane.

waybac-machine

As stated above, the Super Guppy had been developed from the Pregnant Guppy which in turn was based on the C-97 military cargo plane, itself based on the Boeing 377 airliner which in turn was originally based on the B-29 Superfortress bomber.  (It would appear Boeing got their money’s worth out of the B-29 airframe as it had also been used to develop the B-50 bomber and the KC-97 aerial tanker.)

Only 5 Super Guppies were ever built.  Operated by NASA, their purpose was to move oversized cargo.  Loading was done over the nose which would swing to the side (to port) to reveal the cavernous interior cargo bay.  Later, Airbus bought the rights to the design, and in 1982 and 1983, UTA  Industries built 2 of these balumpus transports for France  (Note: “Balumpus” is an adjective made up especially for this article).

One of these unusual planes is still in service with NASA in El Paso, Texas.  The other 4 that were built are on display in France, Germany, England and Tucson, Arizona.

Powered by 4 turboprop engines and manned by a crew of 4, the Super Guppy could fly at speeds of almost 300 mph for almost 2000 miles.  The giant cargo bay measured 25 x 25 x 111 feet, and total cargo weight was just over 54,000 lbs.

Certainly a special airplane that had been built for special purposes, this curiosity has since been replaced by even larger jet-powered transports.  Still, looking at it, one must wonder how such a bulbous plane was ever able to stay in the air or, for that matter, get off the ground!

WABAC to the Super Guppy

WIF Aviation-001

– WIF Aviation