THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 5

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THE RETURN TRIP – Episode 5

…Commander McKinney’s first step in real gravity resembles that of a newborn colt…

Newborn Colt by Robert J Bryan

Newborn Colt by Robert J Bryan

 

Like the superb team they are, precisely the reason they were chosen to inaugurate the Colony, the McKinneys {of space family fame} are moving to advance history. Sampson brings their modified space shuttle into docking position, unleashing thruster blasts for fine tuning. The massive craft floats in with deceptive ease, belying its gross tonnage of 90,000.

independance-dayOnce in place, they are able to shut down the weary guidance systems of the deep-space shuttle, not to be reactivated until it makes way for the second wave of colonists, another 6.2 months from now (which will be 7/4/2030—Independence Day). It will be a long wait, but there will be no shortage of things to do. Space Colony 1 is a state-of-the-art scientific laboratory and this particular pair of space veterans can make these instruments dance.

Sampson frees himself from the pilot’s chair gladly. Albeit quite comfortable, the seat has his body’s imprint in it, but it will be good to have a change of scenery. He and Celeste are looking forward to stretching out underused muscle and ligament.

After extended space travel, this first foray into it, space medicine experts are giddy by having this look into the human physiology aspect. Commander McKinney’s first step in real gravity resembles that of a newborn colt. It is embarrassing to stagger helplessly with almost everyone on Earth watching live or on tape delay. He shrugs off Celeste’s chuckles to regain his balance.

beauty-crown-001Not unexpectedly, the sleek figure of Lieutenant Commander McKinney does not fare any better than her mate, but looks prettier doing it. From most any point of view, her Miss Sweden 2014 crown would not have tumbled from her head, not like her astronaut headgear. She tries to corral her long platinum blond hair, throwing her head back, trying to act like nothing had happened.

In the process, she tips over sideways, puts out her left hand out to brace herself… thereby slicing open her palm on a digital gyroscope display. Blood flows through the epidermis immediately, sending Sampson to the nearest station first aid kiosk for gauze and sterilization material. He is terribly concerned, yet calmly tends the ugly wound.display

“Don’t think that this will keep you off the job,” using his worst bedside manner. “It should be okay before we need it.”

“I certainly hope so… it’s just a flesh wound.” Celeste is confused by his prognosis.

“I was talking about the monitor!”

Sometimes he treats her a little too much like “one of the guys”. It is advisable for him to display more spousal compassion.

“Did you assign us separate cabins Commander McKinney sir?” She is kidding……….mostly.


THE RETURN TRIP

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Episode 5


page 7

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Contents TRT

Independence Day – Let Freedom Ring

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Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring

The Declaration of Independence is the usual name of a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies,then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as thirteen newly independent sovereign states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. Instead they formed a new nation—the United States of America. John Adams was a leader in pushing for independence, which was unanimously approved on July 2. Acommittee of five had already drafted the formal declaration, to be ready when Congress voted on independence. The term “Declaration of Independence” is not used in the document itself.

Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which Congress would edit to produce the final version. The Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The national birthday, Independence Day, is celebrated on July 4, although Adams wanted July 2.

After ratifying the text on July 4, Congress issued the Declaration of Independence in several forms. It was initially published as the printedDunlap broadside that was widely distributed and read to the public. The source copy used for this printing has been lost, and may have been a copy in Thomas Jefferson’s hand. Jefferson’s original draft, complete with changes made by John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, and Jefferson’s notes of changes made by Congress, are preserved at the Library of Congress. The best known version of the Declaration, a signed copy that is popularly regarded as the official document, is displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. This engrossed copy was ordered by Congress on July 19, and signed primarily on August 2.

The sources and interpretation of the Declaration have been the subject of much scholarly inquiry. The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural and legal rights, including a right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, references to the text of the Declaration were few for the next four score years. Abraham Lincoln made it the centerpiece of his rhetoric (as in the Gettysburg Address of 1863), and his policies. Since then, it has become a well-known statement on human rights, particularly its second sentence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

This has been called “one of the best-known sentences in the English language”, containing “the most potent and consequential words in American history”. The passage came to represent a moral standard to which the United States should strive. This view was notably promoted by Abraham Lincoln, who considered the Declaration to be the foundation of his political philosophy, and argued that the Declaration is a statement of principles through which theUnited States Constitution should be interpreted.

It provided inspiration to numerous national declarations of independence throughout the world. Historian David Armitage, after examining the influence of the American “Declaration” on over 100 other declarations of independence, says:

The American Revolution was the first outbreak of the contagion of sovereignty that has swept the world in the centuries since 1776. Its influence spread first to the Low Countries and then to the Caribbean, Spanish America, the Balkans, West Africa, and Central Europe in the decades up to 1848…. Declarations of independence were among the primary symptoms of this contagion of sovereignty.

Thirteen Colonies
United States
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
History
Established May 10, 1775
Disbanded March 1, 1781
Preceded by First Continental Congress
Succeeded by 1st Confederation Congress
Seats Variable; ~60
Meeting place
1775–1777: Pennsylvania State House,Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1775–1781: Variable
Footnotes
Though there were about 50 members of the Congress at a given time, it was the states that had votes, so there were effectively only 13 seats.

 


Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring


 

Independence Day – Let Freedom Ring

Leave a comment

Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring

 

The Declaration of Independence is the usual name of a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies,then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as thirteen newly independent sovereign states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. Instead they formed a new nation—the United States of America. John Adams was a leader in pushing for independence, which was unanimously approved on July 2. Acommittee of five had already drafted the formal declaration, to be ready when Congress voted on independence. The term “Declaration of Independence” is not used in the document itself.

Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which Congress would edit to produce the final version. The Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The national birthday, Independence Day, is celebrated on July 4, although Adams wanted July 2.

After ratifying the text on July 4, Congress issued the Declaration of Independence in several forms. It was initially published as the printedDunlap broadside that was widely distributed and read to the public. The source copy used for this printing has been lost, and may have been a copy in Thomas Jefferson’s hand. Jefferson’s original draft, complete with changes made by John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, and Jefferson’s notes of changes made by Congress, are preserved at the Library of Congress. The best known version of the Declaration, a signed copy that is popularly regarded as the official document, is displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. This engrossed copy was ordered by Congress on July 19, and signed primarily on August 2.

The sources and interpretation of the Declaration have been the subject of much scholarly inquiry. The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural and legal rights, including a right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, references to the text of the Declaration were few for the next four score years. Abraham Lincoln made it the centerpiece of his rhetoric (as in the Gettysburg Address of 1863), and his policies. Since then, it has become a well-known statement on human rights, particularly its second sentence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

This has been called “one of the best-known sentences in the English language”, containing “the most potent and consequential words in American history”. The passage came to represent a moral standard to which the United States should strive. This view was notably promoted by Abraham Lincoln, who considered the Declaration to be the foundation of his political philosophy, and argued that the Declaration is a statement of principles through which theUnited States Constitution should be interpreted.

It provided inspiration to numerous national declarations of independence throughout the world. Historian David Armitage, after examining the influence of the American “Declaration” on over 100 other declarations of independence, says:

The American Revolution was the first outbreak of the contagion of sovereignty that has swept the world in the centuries since 1776. Its influence spread first to the Low Countries and then to the Caribbean, Spanish America, the Balkans, West Africa, and Central Europe in the decades up to 1848…. Declarations of independence were among the primary symptoms of this contagion of sovereignty.

Thirteen Colonies
United States
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
History
Established May 10, 1775
Disbanded March 1, 1781
Preceded by First Continental Congress
Succeeded by 1st Confederation Congress
Seats Variable; ~60
Meeting place
1775–1777: Pennsylvania State House,Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1775–1781: Variable
Footnotes
Though there were about 50 members of the Congress at a given time, it was the states that had votes, so there were effectively only 13 seats.

 

Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring

Independence Day – Let Freedom Ring

Leave a comment

Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring

 

The Declaration of Independence is the usual name of a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies,then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as thirteen newly independent sovereign states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. Instead they formed a new nation—the United States of America. John Adams was a leader in pushing for independence, which was unanimously approved on July 2. Acommittee of five had already drafted the formal declaration, to be ready when Congress voted on independence. The term “Declaration of Independence” is not used in the document itself.

Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which Congress would edit to produce the final version. The Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The national birthday, Independence Day, is celebrated on July 4, although Adams wanted July 2.

After ratifying the text on July 4, Congress issued the Declaration of Independence in several forms. It was initially published as the printedDunlap broadside that was widely distributed and read to the public. The source copy used for this printing has been lost, and may have been a copy in Thomas Jefferson’s hand. Jefferson’s original draft, complete with changes made by John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, and Jefferson’s notes of changes made by Congress, are preserved at the Library of Congress. The best known version of the Declaration, a signed copy that is popularly regarded as the official document, is displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. This engrossed copy was ordered by Congress on July 19, and signed primarily on August 2.

The sources and interpretation of the Declaration have been the subject of much scholarly inquiry. The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural and legal rights, including a right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, references to the text of the Declaration were few for the next four score years. Abraham Lincoln made it the centerpiece of his rhetoric (as in the Gettysburg Address of 1863), and his policies. Since then, it has become a well-known statement on human rights, particularly its second sentence:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

This has been called “one of the best-known sentences in the English language”, containing “the most potent and consequential words in American history”. The passage came to represent a moral standard to which the United States should strive. This view was notably promoted by Abraham Lincoln, who considered the Declaration to be the foundation of his political philosophy, and argued that the Declaration is a statement of principles through which theUnited States Constitution should be interpreted.

It provided inspiration to numerous national declarations of independence throughout the world. Historian David Armitage, after examining the influence of the American “Declaration” on over 100 other declarations of independence, says:

The American Revolution was the first outbreak of the contagion of sovereignty that has swept the world in the centuries since 1776. Its influence spread first to the Low Countries and then to the Caribbean, Spanish America, the Balkans, West Africa, and Central Europe in the decades up to 1848…. Declarations of independence were among the primary symptoms of this contagion of sovereignty.

Thirteen Colonies
United States
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
History
Established May 10, 1775
Disbanded March 1, 1781
Preceded by First Continental Congress
Succeeded by 1st Confederation Congress
Seats Variable; ~60
Meeting place
1775–1777: Pennsylvania State House,Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1775–1781: Variable
Footnotes
Though there were about 50 members of the Congress at a given time, it was the states that had votes, so there were effectively only 13 seats.

 

Independence Day

– Let Freedom Ring

Excuse Me Holidays – From Hallmark

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Made up Holiday Dates

made-up-holiday-dates

No Real History……

On April 21, 1952 the first Secretaries’ Day was celebrated.  The presidents of the National Secretaries Association and of Dictaphone Corporation came up with the unofficial holiday in conjunction with an ad agency.  Now called Administrative Professionals Day, it is now celebrated on the Wednesday during the last week of April (in the US and Canada).

Cracked fact: The International Association of Administrative Professionals (the renamed National Secretaries Association) holds the copyright to the name, Administrative Professionals Day.  The day is celebrated in several other countries on various dates and by various names.


Sweetest Day.

Along with Mothers Day and Fathers Day among others considered a “Hallmark Holiday” created commercially to sell candy and greeting cards, it was invented in Cleveland in 1921 by the newspaper, The Plain DealerMEN: DO NOT FORGET THIS HOLIDAY!

 St. Valentine’s Day

Celebrated on February 14 in most of western Christendom and in July by Eastern Orthodox Christians, there is no single St. Valentine, but a hodge-podge of various martyrs rolled into one!  Even then, the stories may well be fictional.  This day is another holiday that is dangerous for men to forget!

 Independence Day.

July 4th is not the day the US gained independence which did not come until Britain had lost the war, it is just the date some of the Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence.  Try not to hurt yourself with fireworks.

Columbus Day.

This day celebrates the “discovery” of the Americas on October 12, when millions of Native Americans had already discovered it!  It was made the 2nd Monday in October in 1970, although 4 states refuse to celebrate it and many no longer treat it as a state holiday.  Native Americans do not celebrate this holiday!