Game Changing Moments – WIF History

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Historical Moments

That Changed

Everything

Like the moment when Archduke Franz Ferdinand was taken out because his assassin stopped for a sandwich, some small moments in history can have absolutely incredible impact. While most things in the world take place because of boring and tedious work done over decades, there are those times when things hang in the balance, and the wrong move can alter the course of history forever. Below are several scenarios where the history of the world changed in a very short span of time – if these things had happened differently, we could be living with a very different world today.

 10. James Comey Releasing The Final Report About Hillary Clinton

Certainly, there are many factors involved in the recent election that caused it to come out the way it did, and no one can say that Hillary Clinton was an incredibly strong campaigner. However, when it got close to the end, most of the polls said that Hillary Clinton was going to win handily, and yet somehow she did not manage to do so. In fact, while locking up the popular vote, she lost the Electoral College by quite a lot. Some of the reason for her inability to cross the finish line at the end is that her candidacy was not the most exciting, but the folks at FiveThirtyEight, who perform statistical number crunching of elections, believe it was at least the final straw.

They believe that the final Comey letter about Hillary Clinton, her “October Surprise” as it were, was essentially the straw that broke the camel’s back. After all the various election ads against her, and all the various things that she was questioned over such as Benghazi, a final suggestion that she was once again being investigated, after it was supposed to be over, likely tipped the final scales in favor of Donald Trump. While we cannot know for sure how Hillary Clinton would have governed, it is safe to say that she would have had a very different presidency from Donald Trump, and left a very different mark on the world.

9. The Assassination Of Abraham Lincoln

Just weeks before the American Civil War came to a close, Abraham Lincoln found himself inside Ford’s Theater to relax and take in a show. Then, as we all know, the actor and southern sympathizer John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln in the head and ended the second term of his presidency early. Unfortunately, while Booth shot Lincoln in the head, he may have also shot himself, and the South, in the foot. The problem is that right after the Civil War, Lincoln’s plan was to try to get the South rebuilt, forgiven and friendly with the North again as soon as possible. He wanted true reconciliation and reconstruction, and he didn’t want to waste any time. However, the so-called radical Republicans in congress wanted stricter measures against the South, for which the South didn’t want to cooperate.

Then Andrew Johnson, Lincoln’s successor, was much more of a Southern sympathizer, which meant that the radical Republicans did not want to work with him on Southern reconstruction, or really on anything. This led to an atmosphere where, instead of both sides working together to rebuild and reconcile, the South tried to get away with as much as it could, and the North tried to punish them for past crimes. This eventually led to Andrew Johnson’s impeachment, and poor leadership that caused the Jim Crow South to be an issue to this very day. The South is still a bit of a mess, all because one angry Southerner’s misguided desire for revenge caused him to take out the man with the plan and influence to fix it. And while some may think Lincoln couldn’t have done it, there is evidence that Lincoln already had support for plans similar to those presented by Andrew Johnson, but that support was withdrawn when Johnson was sworn in, because many politicians did not want to work with a Southern sympathizer.

8. The Yalta Conference Reinforced Soviet Hegemony In Eastern Europe

The Cold War raged up until very recently and if you asked some, it never ended at all. Certainly, even if it did end temporarily, it would seem that a serious conflict with the Russians is nearing again. People are once again getting worried about a violent and global domination-hungry Russia, and tensions have not been higher since the early days of the Cold War. However, it is possible all of this could have long ago been avoided, or at least been very different from how it is now. At the Yalta Conference, in the final discussions between the three major allied leaders, Franklin Roosevelt was nearing the end of his life, and his skills as a negotiator were greatly slipping.

It was said Winston Churchill could not convince Stalin (and did not get along with the man), but Roosevelt was able to get on with him as a friend and equal, and get a lot out of him in terms of negotiation. Experts say that at the Yalta Conference, Roosevelt was exhausted and gave away far too much to Stalin, basically giving away the Eastern European countries that went on to be held by the Soviet Union for decades. While Stalin already held some of the territory, Roosevelt basically gave it up without a fight. If he had managed to get Stalin to back off from much of Eastern Europe to begin with, Churchill may never have given his Iron Curtain speech, and we may not have a man like Putin today who thinks half of Europe belongs to his country by birthright.

7. The Challenger Disaster Was Caused By A Dangerous Few Moments Of Groupthink In A Single Meeting

The Challenger was set to launch, and people were incredibly excited to see it, with NASA promoting it as much as possible. Then, disaster struck. After watching the shuttle explode on national TV, with school children watching around the country, it turned out that the issue was a faulty o-ring that messed up the heat seal and caused the whole thing to be consumed. Immediately many people wondered how the shuttle could go up like that at all. After all, there were procedures in place to test every last part down to the last decimal to make sure there were no issues.

However, it quickly turned it that it did indeed come down to human error. At a meeting the issue of the o-ring had been brought up, but those who were in charge of the meeting seemed uninterested in seriously discussing it, and even though many in the meeting knew it needed to be discussed more for safety, they did not want to upset their superiors. In the end, the meeting became such a perfect example of the psychological phenomenon of groupthink – where people make bad decisions to not rock the boat in a group, even when they know the decision is catastrophically terrible – that mock ups of the meeting have been made using professional actors, in order to help teach the concept to psychology students.

6. The Hessian Commander Neglected A Note Saying George Washington Was Crossing The Delaware

The Crossing of the Delaware is one of the most famous moments in the American Revolution, and has been immortalized with an incredibly famous painting, which stirs the imagination of the bold deed performed by George Washington and his men, in order to take the enemy off guard when they were at their most vulnerable. It was a crucial point in the war that we all know very well, and it could have turned out very differently if the Hessian Commander had taken the warnings he got more seriously.

The Hessian Commander was found much later with a note that told of Washington planning an imminent attack, something a spy had slipped the commander days before. However, he did not take the warnings particularly seriously, and was caught up not properly prepared when Washington came for him and his men. Part of the issue was that they were constantly being harassed by local militias, which made things more chaotic when the full attack from the Colonials arrived. However, the simple fact of the matter is that if the commander had prepared himself for a full blown attack (not just from the local militias, but from Washington) and stayed alert, the entire plan may have been foiled.

5. Andrew Wakefield’s Fake Anti-MMR Study Is Causing Deaths To This Day

Andrew Wakefield is a man who has more blood on his hands than most people who have ever been called a doctor – which he isn’t anymore, because he was kicked off the medical register in the UK for his fraudulent nonsense. Back in the late 1990s Wakefield published a fraudulent medical paper that he was later forced to retract, claiming that vaccines caused autism in children. Despite the fact that the study was swiftly disproven, and Wakefield shown as the scam artist he is, this is still causing horrible problems to this day.

His paper was a catalyst that started a movement, now endorsed by multiple celebrities, to not vaccinate your children. This nonsense has already led to outbreaks of measles in the United States, and has led to more bouts of whooping cough and other potentially deadly diseases that we had previously had under control. Just one fraudulent scientific paper is causing increased deaths decades later, due to so many people that listened to bad medical advice, and decided to embrace conspiracy theories. Unfortunately, it’s hard to convince these anti-vaxxers to protect their children and everyone else’s, because anti-vaccine believers tend to have a cult-like mindset. If you believe that vaccines don’t cause autism, in their mind, you are a part of the big cover-up, or a sheep unwilling to see the truth.

4. President Truman’s Controversial Decision To Launch Two Atomic Bombs On Populated Cities

The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is a moment in history that will remain in infamy forever. Some people defend it saying that at that point, nothing less had any chance of convincing the Japanese to surrender peacefully, and that otherwise we would have had total war that led to way more deaths on both sides overall. Others would argue that the Japanese were already low on resources and morale, and we could have possibly worked out a peaceful surrender from them without dropping two giant bombs on populated cities.

However, whether you agree with the decision or not, it was an historic moment that forever shaped the globe. Since then nuclear paranoia set in, and countries immediately started racing to build as many of their own and test them all over the world, releasing untold amounts of radiation. This global arms race persists today, where many people still face the possibility of nuclear annihilation daily, and are only comforted by the fact that nuclear war would be unlikely to happen because it would be a no win scenario.

The world could possibly have been a very different place. Even if nuclear testing had continued in various countries, without the historic example of heavily populated cities being leveled in a moment, the true paranoia we see today would likely not exist – we might have had a world where people knew a nuclear weapon existed, but didn’t particularly fear them and feel so paranoid, because they had no proper context in which to put a real life nuclear attack.

3. Teddy Kennedy’s Actions Immediately Following Chappaquiddick Ruined His Presidential Dreams

Most people have heard of Teddy Kennedy, one of the three original Kennedy brothers and often called the lion of the senate. Some wondered, as he got on in years, why he never sought the presidency, and the answer is that he once did, and ended up being sunk by his own actions. Back when he was younger, he was a very powerful up and coming politician, and was indeed running for president. He was charismatic, had a lot of support, and likely would have won the Democratic primary, with a good chance at the general election. And while we cannot know exactly what kind of policies he would have had, the Kennedys never did anything small, so it is certainly likely he would have had a strong historical impact as president. However, just as his star was as bright as it could be, he got himself into big trouble.

He was out with a woman in his car on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts, when the car crashed over a bridge into the water. He managed to make it out of the car, but not with the woman – Mary Jo Kopechne. He did not notify the police until many hours later, and not until after he had had a good talk with his lawyers about how he could get out of trouble. Many speculated that he did not go to the police immediately or report it because he was drunk and wanted to sober up – he suspected he would be arrested for things like manslaughter and drunk driving if he went to the police right away. Still, he was a Kennedy and they were known for being playboys, he could have potentially managed to avoid it sinking his political career if he had went straight to the police, but the way he handled the incident sunk him. Most people were rather disturbed how callously he left the woman to die.

2. Reagan’s Firing Of Over 1000 Air Traffic Controllers Has Had Lasting Repercussions For All Unions

Many people do not remember the firing of the air traffic controllers under President Reagan, but it still has vast ramifications to this day. The short version of the story is that the then-union for the air traffic controllers was on strike for better pay, and the negotiations were simply not going very well at all. Both sides kept going back and forth, and an agreement was not being put in place quickly enough. Fed up with the entire thing, President Reagan declared it an illegal strike and threatened to fire each and every single one of them if they didn’t stop striking. Unfortunately for them, they called what they thought was a bluff. It wasn’t, and they were all fired.

At first people thought this would be a huge disaster, because air traffic controllers are really important, but he put in military controllers until others could be trained and everything worked out okay. This was a huge blow to unions in general and greatly set them back over the years. However, this wasn’t necessarily something Reagan would have wanted. He didn’t think unions in general were bad or that workers shouldn’t have rights, but he saw a situation where these were vital jobs that absolutely must be filled, and the terms could not be agreed upon. He saw it as an extreme act in an emergency – he did not plan to break the backs of labor unions.

1. Colin Powell’s False Presentation About Iraq Got Us Into War With A Potential Ally

Colin Powell’s presentation about WMDs before congress will go down as one of the most pivotal moments in history. Now, there is some debate and confusion as to whether Powell was simply being used, or was complicit in what was happening. Either way, an incredibly false and misleading presentation made it look like there were WMDs in Iraq when there actually were none at all. This led the United States into a full blown war in Iraq that has had lasting ramifications to this very day. And to make matters worse, there is reason believe that if we hadn’t taken out Saddam, we may have had a stable ally in the region who could have been of great help.

When Saddam Hussein was captured, he explained that he was actually shocked and confused that Iraq was attacked. He thought that the United States would want to ally with him to help find terrorists after what happened on 9/11, and didn’t understand why he was a target when none of the terrorists were from Iraq. He had thought he could help us and that what happened would bring Iraq and the United States closer together. While some may believe Saddam to be brutal, he kept the region stable, something we have been unable to accomplish. If Saddam had remained in power and his words are to be believed, we may have had both a stable Iraq and a solid and stalwart ally in the region.


Game Changing Moments

– WIF History

You got GOLD, welcome to the United States! – WABAC to California

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"Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Where is the WABAC Machine going to take us this time, Mr. Peabody?

“Set the WABAC for 1850 California Sherman My Boy…oh and do you remember where I put my pick-ax?”

 

September 9, 1850: California Becomes 31st American State

california

You got GOLD, welcome to the United States!

On September 9, 1850, in the middle of the California Gold Rush, California was admitted to the Union as the 31st state of the United States.  The second largest state at the time until the admission of Alaska, when it fell to third, California is currently the most populous US state and has claim to many other reasons why it might be the greatest state.

Look what we started……

The state that gave us Disneyland, Knotts Berry Farm, the politicians Ronald Reagan, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Richard Nixon, California also gives us world class wines and Rice-a-Roni, the San Francisco treat.

California is also blessed with mountains, beaches, an incredibly scenic highway, Beverly Hills, surfer dudes and Valley girls.

Speaking of politicians, Californians even re-elected their former governor Jerry Brown back into office in 2011 after he had previously served as governor from 1975 to 1983, an incredible 28 years between terms!  When it comes to electing public figures, Californians seem to have a special place in their hearts for actors and elected B-movie actor Ronald Reagan as governor before he went on to win the race for the White House.  In recent years, California has become more and more left in its leanings, although in 2003 voters ousted the Democratic governor Gray Davis and inserted former body builder and action film hero Arnold “The Austrian Oak” Schwarzenegger in his place.  Arnold, often beset by claims of sexual harassment, turned out to have fathered a child out of wedlock with his maid, which put an end to all remaining political aspirations.  When compared to Richard Nixon, however, former Senator from California and disgraced President of the United States, Arnold does not look that bad.  Other performers have also been elected to office, with Sonny Bono and Clint Eastwood among them.

In terms of sports, California boasts an incredible array of professional teams: including 3 NFL teams; 5 major league baseball teams; 4 NBA teams and 1 WNBA basketball team; 3 NHL teams; and 3 pro soccer teams.  College sports is also big business there, with major schools being UCLA and USC.

California is the agricultural leader of the the US, and produces half of the nation’s fruit.  The US used to get its pistachios from Iran, but after the 1979 unpleasantness, Californian producers provided this service.

The Golden State is also home to many major US military installations.

In one statistic not to be proud of, though, it is also home to one third of all Americans on welfare!

Caucasians (whites) make up 57% of the population and Mexicans 31%.  Obviously Spanish is the second most spoken language in California, but can you guess the third most spoken language?  It is Tagalog, the native language of the Philippines.

Los Angeles has replaced Chicago as the second largest American city and together with Hollywood and San Francisco is renowned for its colorful characters.

 

You got GOLD, welcome to the United States! – WABAC to California

Gen X Diary (bad stuff go happen)

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Top Tenz from WIF

Top Tenz from WIF

Top 10 News Stories That Defined Generation X Forever

POSTED BY  ON FEBRUARY 20, 2014 IN  | 3743 VIEWS | 16 RESPONSES

If you ever want to understand the moody depressed generation which Judd Apatow still thinks he is the spokesman for, then you might want to take a gander at the stories which actually affected them. This list is done in chronological order, rather than order of importance.

10. Ronald Reagan Nearly Shot To Death

hinckley-arrest

On March 31st 1981, President Ronald Reagan was shot and seriously wounded by gunman John Hinckley Jr. Later on, we would learn that the assassination attempt was an attempt to impress actress Jodie Foster, who has since come out as a lesbian. Too bad Hinckley’s gaydar was off that fateful day.

Generation X has grown to have very mixed feelings about the Reagan Presidency. However, the impact of Reagan’s policies cannot be debated. It also cannot be debated that Reagan’s shooting was the catalyst which brought about many of the legislative changes with a Democratic Congress in the 1980′s. Had Reagan died, George Bush’s Presidency would have started in 1981. Had the assassination attempt never occurred, then Congress might have ignored Reagan altogether. That was not exactly mentioned while teachers had us all huddled together in school discussing what happened.

9. The Challenger Explosion

challenger-explosion

On January 28th 1986, a lot was encapsulated for Generation X. Nothing had been more built up as an event for schoolchildren than the launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger. A national search to send a civilian into space had culminated with Christa McAuliffe, a schoolteacher, being selected. She was supposed to actually conductexperiments from space that school children could watch.

Instead, schools wound up gathering children in auditoriums across the United States, and subjecting them to unspeakable tragedy. All the hope of a generation went belly-up in under two minutes. It would become an all-too-common theme for a generation which would continually be promised great things, only to see them turned into tragedy.

8. “Black Monday”

Black-Monday

There is a line in 1994′s The Crow in which Brandon Lee says, “They are all dead. They just don’t know it yet.” Generation X did not immediately understand the message of October 19th, 1987. As the years went on though, the message would become increasingly apparent: “You will never be as successful as your parents … ever.”

On that day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 508 points. This was actually a bigger drop than the crash which caused the Great Depression. There was a quick recovery, but the damage had been done. “Black Monday” led to the recession in the early 1990′s. About the time in which much of Generation X was going into college, the storm clouds of a gloomy economic climate which would last the rest of their lives was forming. The previous generation had taken everything, and as X’ers grew up, the previous generation’s needs and demands would only grow, turning Generation X into a bulwark to facilitate the eventual success which will fall on Baby Boomers’ grandkids, the Millennials, after both previous generations are gone.

7. David Koresh And The Branch Davidians

david-koresh

Like Voldemort was actually Thomas Riddle, David Koresh was born Vernon Wayne Howell. Koresh would eventually become entrenched in the religious sect known as the Branch Davidians. Koresh’s group established a compound near Waco, Texas. A raid that started out as an attempt by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms to arrest Koresh for hoarding weapons turned into a standoff between the Davidians and the United States Government.

The 51-day siege ended on April 19th, 1993, with agents from the FBI storming the compound. A fire ensued, killing 76 people, including Koresh. As a result, anti-government sentiment raised to dangerously high levels throughout the new Clinton Administration. Term such as “domestic terrorism” and “militia movement” got introduced into American lexicons. The result was that poor economic times mixed with conspiracy theory and violent sentiment, creating a very real and very adverse effect on Generation X’s psyche, as well as redefining how people to this day view government. If you want an example, just ask someone from the Tea Party Movement about “Waco,” and be prepared for a long lecture.

6. Kurt Cobain’s Suicide

kurt-cobain

On April 8th, 1994, Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain was found dead in his home. His death, the result of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, sparked a firestorm of discussion across the United States, much of which really marked how far apart Baby Boomers and Generation X really were.



Amid Generation X’s grief, Baby Boomers downplayed the news as irrelevant. In many ways, Generation X was told that their own voice was irrelevant, and not as important as their elders. Andy Rooney, for example, went on 60 Minutes to make a point of talking about more important people who had died that week. Daring to compare Cobain to figures such as John Lennon was seen as blasphemy. afterward.

5. The Oklahoma City Bombing

oklahoma-city-bombing

The date of April 19th, 1995 being two years after the Branch Davidian compound was not coincidental. Bomber Timothy McVeigh was obsessed with the events surrounding Waco, as well as an earlier government standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho. The bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City would ultimately claim nearly 200 lives, as well as scar Generation X somewhat irrevocably.

Bomber Timothy McVeigh was a member of Generation X, having been born in 1968. The dismissive attitude in which older generations had treated the opinions of X was now being met with unimaginable violence. Moreover, the Oklahoma City Bombing did nothing but fan the flames of the discussion which had been started by the events in Waco. McVeigh would be executed shortly before the events of September 11th, 2011, in which a completely different type of terrorism would dominate the discussion on the news.

4. The Dot Com Bubble Bursts

dot-com-bubble

In the late 1990′s, they called it the “new economy.” Money, and crazy amounts of it,  seemed to be able to be made on the new-fangled internet. Start-up companies abounded and were getting venture capital from investors. The better news for Generation X is that they were being looked to in order to program, drive, and profit from an economy where a store front was now a computer. After all, tech-savvy young adults were the ones who truly understood the Internet. Generation X was coming out of college at this point, and ready.  Websites referred to as “dot com” companies were even advertising during the Super Bowl.

By the year 2000 though, many of these companies ran out of money, and did not return a profit. The entire industry seemed to self-destruct overnight. Unfortunately, Generation X believed that the boom might result in some stability. This led to their credit going bust, forcing them to delay purchases such as houses and cars, which is never a good sign for any economy. In short, Generation X went into college with a recession, and graduated into another one. The first one affected their ability to inherit. The second one affects their ability to collect future earnings.

3. 9/11

9-11

The coordinated attacks of September 11, 2001, which killed thousands in New York City, Washington DC, and Pennsylvania, was both a tragedy and a black mark in the nation’s history. It was an economic disaster at a time when the Dot Com recovery had not fully taken place. plus, Generation X was now asked to fight a war on two fronts: Afghanistan and Iraq. While these wars were the most unpopular in United States history since Vietnam, the military was hiring, as well as doling out substantial bonuses for signing up. For many, the only viable career options were in the United States military. This was not exactly how a generation once seen as slackers, who wanted nothing more than to sit at computers and become millionaires while wearing flannel, saw their collective futures shaping up.

Now, record numbers of Generation X’ers deal with post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of their service. They would also come back to a world to find that they would again be none the richer for it.

2. Hurricane Katrina

hurricane-katrina

It is hard to believe that, as of this writing, it has been over eight years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29th, 2005. The Gulf Coast was never exactly a model of economic stability, but Katrina seemed to exacerbate an already economically distressed region. Today, there are still lasting effects, since losing everything that you own can occasionally not only take years, but also generations to recover from.

The additional problem was that the resulting diaspora also put a job crunch on other areas which did not have jobs to spare. A domestic crisis at a time when wars were being fought on two fronts spread available resources very thin. Again, in addition to the loss of life and the human toll, Generation X would see yet another example of how the wealth in their lifetime was disappearing out of the vault like in a Bugs Bunny cartoon.

1. The Stock Market Crash of 2008

wall-st-2008-crash

In September of 2008, what had already been over a year of bad economic times were further hindered when news of a failed bailout caused the Dow Jones to drop nearly 800 points. It was the worst drop in United States history, as well as the worst day of trading since the first full day of trading after 9/11.

Generation X was born into recession, dealt with another when they were coming out of high school, and yet one more when they were coming out of college. Now, the Great Recession hits, and not only is employment affected but the house they may had been finally able to buy is now worth less than half its original value. The house isn’t even worth half of what they’d be paying the bank for the right to live in it.

Incidentally, that sort of predatory lending and “complex financial products” is now precisely why this latest recession is happening. Even more insulting, the banks are deemed “too big to fail,” but the random nobodies of Generation X are by no means too big to fail. Whatever wealth was left was gone, and soon enough any funds reserved for retirement will be as well. By the time they are told they can’t ever retire, Generation X will be used to bad news. Come to think of it, they should be already.

Gen X Diary

Morality Hard and Fast

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Morality Hard and Fast

 

Mark Twain

“Always do what is right. It will gratify half of mankind and astound the other.”

Mahatma Gandhi

“Seven Deadly Sins”

Wealth without work
Pleasure without conscience
Science without humanity
Knowledge without character
Politics without principle
Commerce without morality
Worship without sacrifice.” 

Marcus Aurelius

“Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one.”
― Marcus AureliusMeditations
Ronald Reagan

“More than a decade ago, a Supreme Court decision literally wiped off the books of fifty states statutes protecting the rights of unborn children. Abortion on demand now takes the lives of up to 1.5 million unborn children a year. Human life legislation ending this tragedy will some day pass the Congress, and you and I must never rest until it does. Unless and until it can be proven that the unborn child is not a living entity, then its right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness must be protected.”

― Ronald Reagan

mo·ral·i·ty
məˈralətē,mô-/
noun
noun: morality
  1. 1.
    principles concerning the distinction between right and wrong or good and bad behavior.
    synonyms: ethics, rights and wrongs, ethicality More

     
     
    • a particular system of values and principles of conduct, esp. one held by a specified person or society.
      plural noun: moralities
      “a bourgeois morality”
    • the extent to which an action is right or wrong.
      “behind all the arguments lies the issue of the morality of the possession of nuclear weapons”

Morality Hard and Fast

Commands – Do This, Not That

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Ronald Reagan

“I have wondered at times what the Ten Commandments would have looked like if Moses had run them through the US Congress.”
― Ronald Reagan

Golda Meir

“Let me tell you the one thing I have against Moses. He took us forty years into the desert in order to bring us to the one place in the Middle East that has no oil!”

― Golda Meir

“We take a cavalier approach to Scripture at our own peril. If the scientific and historical accounts are true, then the commandments, promises and penalties are much more so. The Bible is not just a guideline. It is the authoritative Word of God. Disobeying it has consequences. Obeying it has rewards. Yet we fudge. We compromise. We rationalize. We trade away our spiritual integrity for man’s approval and as we do, we gradually erode our ability to distinguish right from wrong, to see our own failings, and to turn back in repentance to God. We simply have no idea how this cavalier attitude towards God’s Word taints our witness and hinders the kingdom of God.”

― Craig Olson

Commandments

Ruling Wisdom

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Ronald Reagan

“As government expands, liberty contracts.”
― Ronald Reagan

Frank Herbert

“Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristocratic forms. No government in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, government tends more and more to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class — whether that class be hereditary royalty, oligarchs of financial empires, or entrenched bureaucracy.”

― Frank HerbertChildren of Dune

Rulers