Laborious Puns #22

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Laborious Puns #22

“No man needs sympathy because he has to work, because he has a burden to carry. Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.”

Labor Day is a good time to stop and reflect on the august events the the preceding month.

Image result for august to september

Bringing a baby into the world is labor of love.

Image result for childbirth

 

He labored so hard that he worked his fingers to the bonus.

Image result for bonus

In some places there is a lot of Manuel labor for every Juan.

In some countries there is a lot of Manuel labor.

 

They used to experiment on dogs called laboratory retrievers.

A woman union leader who was pregnant had labor pains and then a striking baby.

 

At a company where they dig for gold a labor dispute is a miner problem where no one wants to get the shaft.


Laborious Puns

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#22

The White House – WIF Fun Facts

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Fascinating Facts

About

the White House

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One of the most famous, if not the most famous, Presidential homes in the world is the White House, which is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. Over 6,000 people visit it every day, and it is one of the top tourist attractions in America’s capital. Of course, besides being a famous monument, it is also a home that is steeped in history.

 These are 10 of the most fascinating facts about the White House and the people who lived in it.

10. They Had A Design Contest To Build It

In 1790, Congress passed the Residence Act, which established Washington, D.C. as the capital of the United States. Congress also ordered that the capitol buildings, including the President’s House needed to be built within 10 years.

In order to find architectural plans for the house where the President would live, Congress held a contest. At the urging of George Washington, Irish-born architect James Hoban submitted his plans, which Encyclopedia Britannica said was influenced by Leinster House in Dublin.

Hoban won the contest and his reward was $500 and a lot in D.C. He was also hired on to oversee the construction of the President’s House, which started in 1793. The second President, John Adams, moved into the house in 1800, before it was actually finished.

The total cost of building the President’s House (its name before the White House) was$232,372, which is the equivalent of about $100 million today.

9. It Was Built By Slaves, Freed Slaves, And Immigrants

In July 2016, former First Lady Michelle Obama made some waves during her speech at the Democratic National Convention when she said “…I wake up every morning in a house that was built by slaves.” After the comment, several prominent people said it wasn’t true, or justified the use of slavery by saying they were “well-fed” slaves. However, Obama’s statement was totally correct.

According to the book The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves in the White House, about 400 of the 600 people who built the Capitol, including the White House, were slaves. The other 200 were about 50 freed slaves and the remainder were poor immigrants.

The White House Historical Association confirms that slaves did help build the White House, but they weren’t government owned. Instead, they just rented them out from slave owners. Because that totally makes it OK, right?

8. The British Burned It Down

In June 1812, the United States, which was only 36-years-old at the time, declared war on Great Britain. There were several underlying reasons for the war, but one of them was to take over Canada, which was a British colony, and make it part of America.

Throughout the war, each side had major victories and suffered terrible losses. One of the biggest military defeats for the Americans happened on August 24, 1813, when British forces invaded Washington, D.C. In retaliation for sacking York, which is now Toronto, the President’s House was relieved of a few souvenirs before it was set ablaze. The ensuing fire nearly destroyed the building. After torching the President’s House, several other prominent buildings in Washington were burned to the ground.

Rebuilding started soon afterwards and the White House was restored to its original architectural plans. In fact, James Hoban, who oversaw the original construction, was rehired to oversee the reconstruction to make it as close to the original as possible. The reconstruction was completed by 1817, just in time for President James Monroe to move in.

After the Burning of Washington, the Americans fought back against the British and won several important victories. This led to the signing of the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814. Part of the treaty was that any captured territory by either side would be returned.

What’s interesting is how this part of history is taught in schools in the United States and Canada, who have had uninterrupted peace with each other since the War of 1812. In the United States, students are taught that the War of 1812 was a war that earned the respect of the British and strengthened the nation as a whole, allowing them to expand westward.Canadian students, on the other hand, learn that the War of 1812 was the one time that the aggressive Americans tried to invade Canada and for their troubles, they got their capital and the White House burned down.

7. Why Is The White House White?

One myth about the White House is that it’s white to cover up the fire damage that was caused when it burned down in 1814. However, that isn’t true because it was white before it was set on fire. In 1798, a lime-based whitewash was painted on to protect the porous stone from cracking. Usually, the whitewash would have weathered and faded away. However, instead they kept reapplying the whitewash until 1818, when it was painted with lead-based white paint.

The house was originally called the President’s House, but since it was distinctively white, its nickname was the white house for almost a century. It wouldn’t officially become the White House until 1901 under President Theodore Roosevelt.

6. Pets There Have Included Alligators, Badgers, Bears, and a Dog Named Satan

Besides being home to the First Family, the White House has also had its fair share of pets. Out of 45 Presidents, there are only three Presidents who have no record of owning a pet: Chester A. Arthur, Franklin Pierce, and Donald Trump.

In most cases, the pets were dogs or cats. Abigail Adams had a dog named Satan, for instance. However, it’s also been home to some more exotic pets. Calvin Coolidge had a menagerie and the main attraction was a 600 pound pygmy hippopotamus named Billy.

Two different Presidents had alligators roam the White House grounds – Herbert Hoover and John Quincy Adams. Supposedly Adams kept a gator in the bathroom in the East Room and used it to scare guests.

Martin Van Buren was given two tiger cubs by the Sultan of Oman. However, supposedly Congress made him donate the cubs to a zoo.

Finally, Theodore Roosevelt had a badger named Josiah and was given a bear, which his children named Jonathan Edwards, by a group of voters in West Virginia. However, he didn’t have the proper accommodations for the bear, which Roosevelt called “queer-tempered,” and he ended up donating the bear to the Bronx Zoo.

5. Lyndon B. Johnson’s Shower

Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th President of the United States, was a relentlessly hard worker who was known for getting things done. He was also a man with a strong sexual appetite who seemed to be obsessed with his own genitals. He was known to whip it out whenever and where ever he wanted to. So it really shouldn’t be a surprise that he had some odd requests when it came to his shower.

According to Kate Andersen Brower’s book The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House, Johnson wanted to have several nozzles that switched from hot to cold. He also wanted the pressure to be intense, like a fire hose. Finally, he wanted a nozzle pointed directly at his genitals and to shoot up his rear end.

When the plumber said it couldn’t be done, Johnson himself called the plumber and chewed him out. To inspire him, Johnson said, “If I can move 10,000 troops in a day, you certainly can fix the shower.” So the plumber tinkered with the shower and it ended up with four nozzles. One time, an usher apparently tried the shower and it pinned him to the wall.

When Nixon moved into the White House in 1969, he ordered the plumber to get rid of Johnson’s shower.

4. Market Value

Before Donald Trump was elected President, we could say with certainty that the White House would never go on sale; but now, who knows what will happen? He is a real estate mogul, after all.

If he were to put it on the market, what would be a fair asking price? Well, the real estate website Zillow came up with an estimate for the house, which is a single family home with 142 rooms on six floors and about 55,000 square feet, and sits on an 18 acre lot. If you were to include all the historical artifacts with it and the hot tub that was installed under Bill Clinton (because of course Slick Willie installed a hot tub), then it would cost $398 million. Or if President Trump wanted to rent it out, it would cost $2,079,473.

3. The White House’s Deadly Water Supply

The ninth President of the United States, William Henry Harrison, holds two Presidential records and the common belief is that these two records are connected. The first is that Harrison gave the longest inaugural speech, which he did outside on a cold and miserable March day without a coat. The second record is that he was President for the shortest amount of time. He died on April 4, 1841, 32 days into his presidency, from what was believed to be pneumonia, which he caught while giving his long inauguration speech.

However, according to Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, who did a modern-day medical investigation, Harrison most likely died of Typhoid Fever and not of pneumonia. The source of the typhoid fever was the White House’s water supply. Mackowiak also thinks that the water in the White House killed President James K. Polk, who died in 1849, three months after leaving the White House, and president Zachary Taylor, who died in office in 1850.

2. Does It Have Secret Passages?

One of the most mythical elements of the White House is its secret passages and tunnels. For example, it was rumored that John F. Kennedy used the tunnels to sneak out of the White House to meet Marilyn Monroe. However, that’s all they appear to be – myths.

While there have been renovations of the White House over the years, including additions, the White House wasn’t really designed to house things like tunnels and secret passages. The closest thing to a secret lair is the Presidential Emergency Operations Center, which was built after the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the time, the Council of National Defense urged Franklin D. Roosevelt to move out of the White House because they thought it was a “firetrap.” His compromise was to build a bomb shelter in the White House.

The Presidential Emergency Operations Center is in the basement of the East Wing. It serves as the communication center and it is able to withstand a nuclear blast. It’s also important to note that the shelter is not the same as the Situation Room, which is in the basement of the West Wing.

One notable time it was used was on September 11, 2001. Vice President Dick Chaney and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, among others, were evacuated from their offices into the Presidential Emergency Operations Center.

1. It Was Almost Torn Down In 1945 Because It Was In Such Bad Shape

By 1945, the White House had been lived in for 145 years and it was in rough shape. Besides being nearly destroyed in 1814, there was another fire in the White House on Christmas Eve 1929. The White House was hosting a party and when the fire started in the West Wing, Herbert Hoover left the party to oversee the removal of papers and documents from the Oval Office, while the First Lady kept the party going. The fire ended up gutting the West Wing, including the Oval Office.

Another problem was that the White House wasn’t constructed to have indoor plumbing and electricity and that was all added well after it was built. This added a lot of stress to the structure of the building. It got to be so bad that Harry S. Truman thought it was going to collapse. In fact, his daughter’s piano fell through a floor into the room below it.

The condition of the White House got to be so bad that it would have been cheaper to tear it down and build something new in its place. However, since it was a national monument Truman was against the idea. They chose to gut the interior of the White House and rebuild it as close to its original design as possible. The reconstruction took four years, during which time Harry and Bess Truman lived in Blair House, which is across the street from the White House.


The White House

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– WIF Fun Facts

Laborious Puns #22

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WIF Style-001Year 2016-001

 

“No man needs sympathy because he has to work, because he has a burden to carry. Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.”

Image result for teddy roosevelt bully

 

1.

Labor Day is a good time to stop and reflect on the august events the the preceding month.

Image result for bad

2. Bringing a baby into the world is labor of love.

Image result for labor of love

 

3.

He labored so hard that he worked his fingers to the bonus.

4. In some places there is a lot of Manuel labor for every Juan.

5. In the NFL there is some  Manuel labor.

Image result for e j manuel

 

6. They used to experiment on dogs called laboratory retrievers.

7. A woman union leader who was pregnant had labor pains and then a striking baby.

Image result for unions

8. At a company where they dig for gold a labor dispute is a miner problem where no one wants to get the shaft.

 

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#22

Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #190

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #190

…Captain Silverio claims, “I have every issue of the Pearson-Eastman Journal filed away in my cabin.”

Pearson-Eastman Journal - Changing cover

Theodore-Roosevelt-on-horse       “Welcome aboard, folks,” greets the captain of the S.S. Oscar II, one Barnabas Silverio. “It’s a rare day when we have such famous passengers.

” He points to a copy of the P-E J’s first issue, Teddy Roosevelt astride his favorite quarter horse, as well as June’s arts issue featuring Pablo Picasso. “I have every issue filed away in my cabin.”

Harv rolls around some numbers in his head. “That would be nearly 65, sir. We are honored to be in the company of such an avid reader.”

“Why do you think we volunteered to give you safe passage? Your magazine has shortened my every voyage, showing me what is going on, on land. So, when word was out that you wanted to get to Europe, we moved some of our trips back, including Henry Ford and his crazy idea about making us a peace ship. We have to take advantage of these open seas. We must keep the bullets coming or there won’t be a Europe to save, at least as we know it.”

Pearson-Eastman Journal-001Pearson-Eastman Journal-001Pearson-Eastman Journal-001Pearson-Eastman Journal-001

Pearson-Eastman Journal-001Pearson Eastman Journal-001Pearson Eastman Journal-001Pearson Eastman Journal-001Pearson Eastman Journal-001

“I guess we won’t be doing another Ford article anytime soon,” Harv surmises.

   “Woodrow Wilson may be out as well,” comments Judith about the President, who has done everything he can to keep America out of the war. He must have something to do with allowing Henry Ford to try his hand at diplomacy.

“Don’t you worry now,” Silverio assures, with a hint of an Italian accent. “He didn’t make up his mind soon enough, plus we will have to repaint the Oscar, with the flags of the Allies and the Centrals no less.  I might just put her in dry dock ‘til the war is over, wait to see if the Swedish flag still exists.”

“We look forward to safe passage, regardless and the chance to capture the essence of a world at war.” Harv shares his vision of untainted coverage.

          “I believe you will.”


Alpha Omega M.D.

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SS Oscar II

Episode #190


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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #185

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #185

…We are living in exciting and dangerous times, you young people who have been called to the care and healing of your fellow man…

Tufts School of Medicine

Tufts University graduates are encouraged to take in fluids and the Dean edits some of the pomp and circumstance, skipping past the salutatorian, a disappointed young woman from Maine, who was asked to introduce the main speaker, former President and recent unsuccessful “Bull Moose” candidate, Theodore Roosevelt.

#26 responded readily to an inspiring letter sent by Willy and Amanda Campbell, with the help of the Loves. He is moved by the expressed feelings of former slaves, turned proud parents of a real doctor, keeping in mind everything Willy had gone through in Blountstown late in 1908 and his passion for the oppressed.

Roosevelt is very much a beloved figure, his impeccable character something to be admired and emulated by aspiring professionals. He has never been a doctor, but he is intimately familiar with the trade due to his rough and tumble lifestyle, not to mention a bullet to the chest before a campaign speech in Milwaukee, just nine months before.

  “We are living in exciting and dangerous times, you young people who have been called to the care and healing of your fellow man. Most of you will go to cities and towns in nearly every state in our proud union. Some of you will discover new medicines from the leaves of tropical plants. Others will put their life on the line to tend to wounded soldiers; you have my advanced gratitude.

“And then there is Alpha Omega Campbell and his Dad.” He motions for the revived subject to join him at the podium, along with Willy, from the rear. “From out the midst of the shadow of slavery comes one of the finest young men I have ever had the chance to meet. I am told, by his proud parents, Willy and Amanda that he is returning to the Tallahassee area to serve the needs of the Negro community.

        Pearson Eastman Journal-001  “Gentlemen and Ladies, these are true American heroes!” He gives them a mighty bear hug.

Judith Eastman makes this a true P-E J moment, a photographic record of a life-changing event; a world leader and a world changer.

The entire graduating class of 1913 rises and cheers, tossing their hats high into the air. They are joined in celebration by the entire plaissance of attenders.

“Bully!” shades of T.R. political rallies past.

Before euphoria takes complete control, A.O. cannot pass up the opportunity to thank the two people responsible for this day, mentors of possibilities and means, in that order. “”My fellow graduates, I know it’s a hot day,” he blushes, “as my lapse in balance can attest, but I will not let this occasion pass without introducing the two men who made the School of Medicine a reality for me, Doctor Siegfried Endlichoffer and Herbert Love!” Herbert stands, while helping Ziggy conquer rusty knees. “I dedicate my future patients to the Lord God Almighty and these men, his good and faithful servants.”


Alpha Omega M.D.

Episode #185


page 173

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #183

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #183

…we sent in the Florida National Guard, in anticipation of Hank Blount pulling some monkey business…

Monkey business

Monkey Business by Mister Bones – Deviantart

“I trust those people,” President Roosevelt tells his Attorney General, Charles Bonaparte, the great-nephew of Napoleon I, of a family of lawyers predating the “Little Corporal”, “and if what they write about this Blount character is true, I am going to make this the last trust I bust!”

          “You will have to stand in line, sir.  We’ve had our eye on him for years, but we did not know how to go about nailing him to the wall, without completely shutting down his town… his town, boy doesn’t that sound strange? We are lucky he didn’t try to secede, creating his own principality.”

     “Oh, my no, Bonaparte. We would have resurrected your uncle Napoleon, if we had to. Bully, I say! Or how does a Rough Rider reunion sound? Can you see 100 fifty year olds storming into that dictator’s town?”

Welcone to-001 “Fortunately it will not come to that. After Pearson’s article went to print, we sent in the Florida National Guard, in anticipation of him pulling some monkey business.”

“National Guard you say… without my authorization? I’m not too thrilled with this lame duck thing.”

“Please don’t be upset, Teddy. You were out West, in the wilderness somewhere, when Pearson warned us about the article. We had to move and the Vice-president signed off on our plan.”

“You speak as if we were successful,” the leader debriefs.

“A Guard battalion caught him leaving town and he is in custody; should be at F.B.I. headquarters in Atlanta, as we speak.”

“The Federal Bureau of Investigation? Bully. Not a year old and already on the job. They will be a crime fighter’s best friend, just you wait!”

“No more escaping justice because of laws that vary from state to state.” Charles Bonaparte is a lame duck himself, but he can be proud that the F.B.I. is created under his watch as the nation’s number one lawyer.


          At the end of the first quarter of 1909:

                   Blountstown is no longer Blount’s town.

                   William Howard Taft is President.

                   Theodore Roosevelt hunts big game in Africa.


Alpha Omega M.D.

Lame Duck by Elisa Groglio

Episode #183


page 171

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #152

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Alpha Omega M.D. – Episode #152

…In a single hour, there is hatched a magazine named the Pearson-Eastman Journal, thus beginning a fresh era of reporting world events and the people in and around them…

Pearson-Eastman Journal - Changing cover

 

After Roosevelt leaves, just like that, the lobby empties, leaving the Pearson-Eastman partnership feeling like they have been run over by a Conestoga wagon. Instead of five foot high wheel marks and hoof print across their backs, they are reminded who is a celebrity and who is not, at least not yet.

  “We have a conference room reserved on the second floor. After that unexpected development, we best not put the cart before the horse.” James’ budding professionalism shows.

The group as a whole is conspicuous by the formality of their dress, for a day that is still considered young; an outward sign that these folks mean business. They file into a good sized rectangular room with military precision, greeted by a hostess who is there to tend to their every creature comfort. She uncovers a lavish fruit tray, which is flanked by carafes filled with piping hot coffee and tea. Flaky croissants are magnets to six sets of hungry hands, as they situate themselves randomly, checking egos at the door.

“This is very impressive, James,” Harv observes while observing.

“I agree,” adds George Eastman. “This gives me some ideas for my boardroom.”

“We at Beacon Hill want to demonstrate how much your business means to us.”

  “We are all in agreement about the arrangements,” says Herbert Love, “but I am equally overwhelmed by your securing our audience with Teddy Roosevelt, let alone him inviting our magazine out to the frontier states. You guys should get some great photographs. I hear the scenery is majestic.”

“You all are coming, aren’t you?” asks an assuming Judith.

“Not this time sweetie. I cannot speak for Herbert, but regular business will more than occupy me. Train travel and tents are not on my agenda… and Judith? How are you on horseback? … and Harv, are you a closet Rough Rider?”

“Hey, smarty pants, we know our way around a stable in Florida, right Herb?”

Panhandle Pete

“That’s right Panhandle Pete!” he affirms with more than a hint of sarcasm.

Oblivious to discussions of the first company trip, Abbey Ferrell distributes copies of the Articles of Incorporation to the principles. In a single hour, there is hatched a magazine named the Pearson-Eastman Journal, thus beginning a fresh era of reporting world events and the people in and around them.


 

Alpha Omega M.D.

Covered Wagon Show (3)

Wagon Train Headed West

Episode #152


page 140

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